School Space and its Occupation

Conceptualising and Evaluating Innovative Learning Environments

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Edited by Scott Alterator and Craig Deed

School Space and its Occupation addresses the ongoing and pressing need for justification of education and environmental innovation. Further, the increasingly important work of evaluating the new learning spaces brings attention to the need for conceptual and methodological clarity.

The editors have assembled a collection of leading authors to explore the links between education and design, progression of ideas in education and architecture, as well as making sense of pedagogical trends and spatial and design relevance. Post-occupancy evaluation is capable of informing both educational and architectural questions to generate sustainable adaptations for educators and designers. Part 2 focuses on the occupancy phase and examines the lived experience of schools to draw conclusions and make recommendations focused impacts and methodological progression.

Contributors: Renae Acton, Scott Alterator, Benjamin Cleveland, Craig Deed, Matthew Dwyer, Debra Edwards, Neil Gislason, Wesley Imms, Peter Lippman, Elizabeth Matthews, Marcus Morse, Vaughan Prain, Matthew Riddle, Warren Sellers, Rebecca Townsend, and Adam Wood.

Developing Professional Memory

A Case Study of London English Teaching (1965–1975)

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Paul Tarpey

In Developing Professional Memory, the author examines narratives from ‘progressive’ and ‘radical’ London-based English teachers who began their careers between 1965 and 1975. English teaching in this period, which the author defines as a ‘cauldron’ of competing and contested currents, is often portrayed negatively in dominant discourses around the subject. The teachers’ narratives, however, provide a much more nuanced and positive story.

By recovering and documenting the collective Professional Memory of English teachers in a particular conjuncture, this volume offers a compelling practitioner account of events and developments and proves that learning from Professional Memory has transformative potential. The author argues that by critically confronting narratives, practices and existing conjunctural circumstances, current practitioners might develop greater agency in debates around their professional roles and responsibilities.

The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World

Resources and Challenges Related to the Professional Work of Teaching

Edited by Hannele Niemi, Auli Toom, Arto Kallioniemi and Jari Lavonen

The teacher's role is changing rapidly throughout the world. Traditional ways of working as a teacher are being challenged and teachers are faced with new areas of expertise they need to manage as educational professionals. These characteristics, challenges, and changes in the teacher’s role have been identified internationally and are both conceptual and practical. Teachers’ work now includes much more than teaching in classrooms and has expanded to designing new learning environments, collaboration and networking with others and mentoring colleagues. The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World addresses the significance of considering these issues, researching them, and emphasising the importance of actively influencing and protecting the parameters of the teacher role.

Activists under 30

Global Youth, Social Justice, and Good Work

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Edited by Shirley R. Steinberg

This unique book is divided into two sections. The first section highlights specific international youth activists, their biographies, work, and accomplishments. The second section is a collection of work by youth, who address their own activism, goals, identities, and needs. Commentaries by teachers, community workers, and facilitators compliment the entries, creating a unique, intergenerational and multi-faceted volume.

The book will serve to fill a gap in teacher education, highlighting and listening to youth, themselves, who, the editor, contends, should be intimately involved in their own education and futures. A new model for teacher education, this book allows teachers to understand that youth must have, and demand, a voice in the determination of their lives and futures. Previous work with youth tends to “deal with them” as a problem to be solved, a group to be managed. This book insists that youth are viable citizens and create a voice which is heard internationally.

Activists under 30 is the first book of its kind, to be addressed to youth, teachers, parents, and activists. It reminds us that youth are our most valuable resource, and insists we incorporate them, invite them, and listen to them.

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Edited by Norvella P. Carter and Michael Vavrus

In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.

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Edited by Norvella P. Carter and Michael Vavrus

In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.

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Holly J. Thornton

The impact a teacher has on students may be profound and lasting. Thus, teacher preparation is grounded in standards to assure that all teacher candidates know the content and have the skills needed to become good teachers. What makes a teacher great? The answer is not clear-cut or easily measured with tests. But we all know a great teacher when we see one. The best teachers have an It Factor that sets them apart from others. It is seemingly intangible and unteachable, as it’s often said that, “Some people are just born to be teachers.” This book challenges that assumption and uncovers the It Factor. Teacher and student voices helped to develop language and tools to examine how teachers are disposed to think and act and how this affects student learning. If we can identify what makes teachers great, we can teach it.

Students have a sea of information, opinions and messaging at their fingertips. They find themselves navigating through a myriad of facts and “alternative facts.” Opinions, beliefs, and fallacies share the same platform and status as well grounded information and vetted ideas, fueling tensions among individuals and distance between groups. Developing students who are caring, critical thinkers and problem-solvers may be more important now than ever. The teachers who are right for this challenge have more than content knowledge and teaching skills. To meet this challenge, teachers need to have “It,” that something inside that makes them not just good teachers, but great ones.

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Edited by Yeping Li and Rongjin Huang

While the importance of knowledge for effective instruction has long been acknowledged, and the concept and structure of mathematics knowledge for teaching are far from being new, the process of such knowledge acquisition and improvement remains underexplored empirically and theoretically. The difficulty can well associate with the fact that different education systems embody different values for what mathematics teachers need to learn and how they can be assisted to develop their knowledge. To improve this situation with needed consideration about a system context and policies, How Chinese Acquire and Improve Mathematics Knowledge for Teaching takes a unique approach to present new research that views knowledge acquisition and improvement as part of teachers’ life-long professional learning process in China. The book includes such chapters that can help readers to make possible connections of teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching in China with educational policies and program structures for mathematics teacher education in that system context.

How Chinese Acquire and Improve Mathematics Knowledge for Teaching brings invaluable inspirations and insights to mathematics educators and teacher educators who wish to help teachers improve their knowledge, and to researchers who study this important topic beyond a static knowledge conception.

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Klaus Zierer and Wolf-Thorsten Saalfrank

Edited by Wolf-Thorsten Saalfrank and Klaus Zierer

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Swantje Ehlers

Edited by Jakob Ossner