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Edited by Michael A. Peters and Rodrigo G. Britez

The essays in this edited collection reflect on the nature of open education resources, where the question on openness for education emerges. What is remarkable today are the ways that teachers and institutions now begin to form part of the processes of global exchange and production of a network of global educational commons. The question about the significance of this development, their limits and the consequences for practitioners and institutions from the perspective of teachers is extremely complex. For example, the policy agenda of institutions, states, and international organizations related to the regulation of new technologies facilitates the existence and viability of those resources. This has consequences for the ways that those resources are used and produced by educators. Contributors to this collection, each on their own way, argue that Open Education involves a commitment to openness and is therefore inevitably a political and social project. This books ends with a challenge for those engaged in exploring the potential impacts and possibilities of open education initiatives. The open education paradigm and its consequences for educators and learners speak of an uneven geography where the access to technological infrastructure does not necessarily imply freedom or openness. In those instances, openness in education related to open education initiatives requires an engagement in research about the ways in which policy, cultural, digital and educational environments facilitate a political commitment to open systems of knowledge production and distribution. One thing is sure, as the essays in this book demonstrated so clearly, these developments promise an implicit paradigm of openness and democratic collaboration in education that remains to be realized.

Racists Beware

Uncovering Racial Politics in the Post Modern Society

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George J. Sefa Dei

With admirable clarity and directness, George Dei exposes the tendency towards the racial re-feudalization of the contemporary public sphere in Canada and, by association, other post-industrial societies. He points to the enormous opportunity costs imposed on racial minorities in the new millennium as a consequence. In RACISTS BEWARE: UNCOVERING RACIAL POLITICS IN THE POSTMODERN SOCIETY, Dei identifies and subjects to close scrutiny the new race-bending logics of what he calls “postmodern” societies in which the dwellers of the suburbs and members of the itinerant white professional middle class (the great beneficiaries of late capitalism and neoliberalization of the economy) now have become the new social plaintiff turning the complaint of racial inequality and discrimination on the heads of those most oppressed. If Gayatri Spivak asks “Can the subaltern speak?” then Dei brilliantly poses the question: “When will Anglo-dominant groups, even critical ones, ever listen?” This book is likely to provoke and influence discussion on racial antagonism for a long, long time to come.

Service Integration in Schools

Research and Policy Discourses, Practices and Future Prospects

Edited by Joan Forbes and Cate Watson

This is an important and timely collection in which recent research and interpretations are reported and debated. The papers provide a scholarly analysis of a range of significant issues, complexities and recurring themes. They provide theoretical, empirical and practical perspectives on what is involved in co-working and explore the ambiguities, contradictions and fragmentations in a new policy area that cuts across the remits previously held by a number of government departments. Overall, the papers provide a considered and wide-ranging critique of the key research and policy discourses that seek to influence the reformation of services and to remodel interprofessional and interagency working practices. In particular, the collection examines the ways in which the integration of services is operating in practice in the discrete policy contexts of the UK countries; the leadership and management of collaborative working and workforce remodelling; and whether, in addressing the hard questions of the form/s that future school services should take, there are any ‘global solutions’ from new research or from other places that might fruitfully be applied. In addressing these policy developments the collection has multiple readerships in mind and seeks to be both academic and policy relevant.

Censorship! ...or Selection?

Confronting a Curriculum of Orthodoxy through Pluralistic Models

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Shaheen Shariff and Leanne Johnny

This book is a must read for academics, policy-makers and teachers who grapple with policy and pedagogical decisions about what to include or exclude in schools that cater to diverse stakeholders. Much has been written about controversial, litigious school censorship controversies relating to text and library books. Post-September 11th, these have expanded to banning of religious clothing and symbols. Court challenges emerge in the context of a global and political media backdrop that consistently reinforces anti-Muslim sentiment. The re-emergence of an extreme right-wing religious backlash against liberal civil liberties that endorse homosexuality, feminism, religious and racial equality create formidable dilemmas for educators, further complicated by the blurred boundaries of free expression, safety and privacy in cyber-space, as students increasingly communicate on-line. Shariff and Johnny argue that censorship is deeply rooted in hegemonic perspectives that sustain neo-colonial privilege and silence the social, historical and intellectual contributions of some students. This “curriculum of orthodoxy” supports discriminatory political/media stereotypes of non-Caucasian ethnic groups through “selection” that is in fact “censorship.” The authors introduce a Critical Legal Literacy model for teacher education that combines legal and digital literacies with critical educational pedagogy to help educators meet contemporary challenges through pluralistic, ethical and educational decisions.

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Edited by Klas Roth and Nicholas C. Burbules

This book offers an examination into the meanings of citizenship in the contemporary world, and trends that are forcing a rethinking of the concept in today’s nation-states. These changing meanings, in turn, give rise to new understandings of, and approaches to, citizenship education. The underlying values of participation, deliberation, and loyalty or patriotism that define different notions of citizenship are under strain in a world increasingly defined by global processes, by the rise of transnational or supranational institutions, and by interconnections that bring different cultures and value systems into closer contact with each other.
What does this new citizen look like? What does this new citizen need to know, or need to be able to do? To whom, and to what, is this new citizen loyal? One way to think about this new citizen is as a cosmopolitan”, a citizen of the world more than of any particular nation-state; another way to think about it is in terms of different kinds or levels of affiliation, existing simultaneously (to nation and to regional alliance, such as the European Union, for example). These conditions of citizenship, and of citizenship education, are rapidly changing and diverse - and in some instances they come into conflict.
This collection of essays an outstanding international group of scholars examines the tensions between national, transnational, and postnational conceptions of citizenship, brought back always to the grounded question of citizenship education and how to go about it. The authors illuminate the complexity and subtlety of these issues, and offer helpful guidance for rethinking the meanings and values that inform our educational endeavours.

Edited by Ruud van der Veen, Danny Wildemeersch, Janet Youngblood and Victoria Marsick

"Education and learning for democracy take place in a wide variety of contexts worldwide. Traditionally, children are prepared to become responsible citizens in families and schools. In non-formal settings and in their lived experience, adults engage in democratic practices. Some people are active members of political parties or trade unions; others take responsibilities in associations of civil society. Still others engage in participatory practices in labor organizations. New practices and understandings of learning for democracy are often attempts to deal with transformations taking place in the contexts in which people operate. They experience the limits of representative democracy and try to enrich it with practices of direct democracy, thereby creating new learning opportunities for the participants involved. Theoretical aspects of learning in democratic practices are explored in Part I of this book. Part II describes examples of learning in political and social action, while Part III describes examples of democratic practices on the shop floor. Together the book delivers an introduction to the field of education for democracy for both social scientists and practitioners interested in ways to support the learning of democracy. Because of it comprehensive character, the book can be used also as a textbook in graduate and post-graduate courses."

Diasporic Ruptures

Globality, Migrancy, and Expressions of Identity; Volume I

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Edited by Alireza Asgharzadeh, Erica Lawson, Keyleen U. Oka and Amar Wahab

Diasporic Ruptures: Globality, Migrancy, and Expressions of Identity lies at the intersections of various processes emerging from globalization: border-crossings, transnationalism, identity formations. Carefully selected and placed in two volumes, the essays here represent works of both well-seasoned scholars as well as emerging writers, academics and intellectuals. The volumes critically examine various manifestations of the trend now commonly known as globalization—manifestations that many diasporic communities, immigrants, and people from all walks of life experience. They also illuminate recent political, social, economic and technological developments that are taking place in a rapidly changing world.
Volume One offers sophisticated insights into the nature of contemporary formations of diasporic life, internationalism, and hybrid identities. The volume asks bold questions around what it means to live in constantly shifting boundaries of nationality, identity, and citizenship. The type of methodological, discursive and experiential awareness promoted by this work helps us understand how millions of people face the challenge of living in a globalizing world; it also fosters a consciousness of how globalization itself functions differently in different environments.
Volume Two (see Volume 7 in Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education) addresses additional and more nuanced questions around culture, race, sexuality, migration, displacement and resistance. It also explores certain epistemological and methodological fallacies regarding conventional articulations of nation-state, nationalism, and the local/global nexus. The volume seeks to answer questions such as: What are the meanings and connotations of ‘displacement’ in a rapidly globalizing world? What are some dilemmas and challenges around notions of cultural hybridity, linguistic diversity, and a sense of belonging? What is the meaning of home in diaspora and the meaning of diaspora at home?
Together, the volumes raise many topics that will be of immense interest to scholars across disciplines and general readers. While celebrating the increasing acknowledgment of difference and diversity in recent times, this work reminds us of the ongoing ramifications of dominant structures of inequality, relations of power, and issues of inclusion and exclusion. This work offers different ways of thinking, writing and talking about globalization and the processes that emerge from it.

Diasporic Ruptures

Globality, Migrancy, and Expressions of Identity; Volume II

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Edited by Alireza Asgharzadeh, Erica Lawson, Keyleen U. Oka and Amar Wahab

Diasporic Ruptures: Globality, Migrancy, and Expressions of Identity lies at the intersections of various processes emerging from globalization: border-crossings, transnationalism, identity formations. Carefully selected and placed in two volumes, the essays here represent works of both well-seasoned scholars as well as emerging writers, academics and intellectuals. The volumes critically examine various manifestations of the trend now commonly known as globalization—manifestations that many diasporic communities, immigrants, and people from all walks of life experience. They also illuminate recent political, social, economic and technological developments that are taking place in a rapidly changing world.
Volume One (see Volume 6 in Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education)offers sophisticated insights into the nature of contemporary formations of diasporic life, internationalism, and hybrid identities. The volume asks bold questions around what it means to live in constantly shifting boundaries of nationality, identity, and citizenship. The type of methodological, discursive and experiential awareness promoted by this work helps us understand how millions of people face the challenge of living in a globalizing world; it also fosters a consciousness of how globalization itself functions differently in different environments.
Volume Two addresses additional and more nuanced questions around culture, race, sexuality, migration, displacement and resistance. It also explores certain epistemological and methodological fallacies regarding conventional articulations of nation-state, nationalism, and the local/global nexus. The volume seeks to answer questions such as: What are the meanings and connotations of ‘displacement’ in a rapidly globalizing world? What are some dilemmas and challenges around notions of cultural hybridity, linguistic diversity, and a sense of belonging? What is the meaning of home in diaspora and the meaning of diaspora at home?
Together, the volumes raise many topics that will be of immense interest to scholars across disciplines and general readers. While celebrating the increasing acknowledgment of difference and diversity in recent times, this work reminds us of the ongoing ramifications of dominant structures of inequality, relations of power, and issues of inclusion and exclusion. This work offers different ways of thinking, writing and talking about globalization and the processes that emerge from it.

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Edited by Cushla Kapitzke and Michael A. Peters

Knowledge is about cultural power. Considering that it is both resource and product within the brave new world of fast capitalism, this collection argues for knowledge cultures that are mutually engaged and hence more culturally inclusive and socially productive. Globalized intellectual property regimes, the privatization of information, and their counterpoint, the information and creative commons movements, constitute productive sites for the exploration of epistemologies that talk with each other rather than at and past each other. Global Knowledge Cultures provides a collection of accessible essays by some of the world’s leading legal scholars, new media analysts, techno activists, library professionals, educators and philosophers. Issues canvassed by the authors include the ownership of knowledge, open content licensing, knowledge policy, the common-wealth of learning, transnational cultural governance, and information futures. Together, they call for sustained intercultural dialogue for more ethical knowledge cultures within contexts of fast knowledge capitalism.

Edited by Devorah Kalekin-Fishman and Pirkko Pitkänen

Conventional thinking maintains that people can belong to only one society and can be loyal to only one nation-state. In a world with rising rates of trans-national migration, however, the possibility of participation, belonging, and loyalty to more than one state is ever more evident. This has led to a rethinking of the notion of nation-based citizenship and increased tolerance toward holding citizenship in more than one country. In practice, over half of the world’s nation-states currently recognize some form of dual citizenship or dual nationality. This book focuses on clarifying and comparing how the rules of acquisition, maintenance, and revocation of dual citizenship have been modified and justified in eight states associated with the European Union: Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. The main question is: How have the rules of attribution, loss and/or acquisition of dual citizenship been modified and justified in these eight states? Viewed in the context of international covenants, legislation regarding dual and multiple citizenship is analyzed in terms of how it is made tangible in juridical, social, cultural, and educational domains.