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The Destructive Path of Neoliberalism

An International Examination of Education

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Edited by Brad Porfilio and Curry Malott

The Destructive Path of Neoliberalism: An International Examination, a compilation of twelve essays by leading scholars and educators, sheds light on the social, political, economic, and historical forces behind the rise of neoliberalism, the dominant ideological doctrine impacting developments in schools and other social contexts across the globe for over thirty years. Several authors provide rich empirical data from schools across the globe to capture how neoliberal imperatives, discourses, and practices are impacting teachers, students, and communities at today’s historical juncture. Finally, several contributors have developed pedagogical initiatives, suggest policy considerations, and convey theoretical insights designed to assist us in the struggle against the corporatization of schooling and social life.

Environmental Education

Identity, Politics and Citizenship

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Edited by Edgar González-Gaudiano and Michael A. Peters

In Environmental Education: Identity, Politics and Citizenship the editors endeavor to present views of environmental educators that focus on issues of identity and subjectivity, and how 'narrated lives’ relate to questions of learning, education, politics, justice, and citizenship. What is distinctive about this collection is that it highlights the views of Latin American scholars alongside those of scholars from Spain, Canada, New Zealand, Taiwan, South Africa, Australia, and U. S. The result is a philosophically nuanced reading of the complexities of environmental education that begins to reshape the landscape in terms of ethics, ontology, epistemology, and politics. The collection bears the stamp of the location of its contributors and strongly reflects an activist, qualitative, and ethnographic orientation that emphasizes the ground for action, the identity of environmental actors, and the contribution that education in all its forms can make to sustainability and the cause of the environment. At the same time, contributors go beyond simple slogans and ideologies to question the accepted truths of this rapidly emerging field.
Cover picture: Edgar González-Gaudiano: Siem Reap, Cambodia, December 2007.

Global Citizenship Education

Philosophy, Theory and Pedagogy

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Edited by Michael A. Peters, Alan Britton and Harry Blee

The essays in this edited collection argue that global citizenship education realistically must be set against the imperfections of our contemporary political realities. As a form of education it must actively engage in a critically informed way with a set of complex inherited historical issues that emerge out of a colonial past and the savage globalization which often perpetuates unequal power relations or cause new inequalities. The essays in the book explore these issues and the emergent world ideologies of globalism, as well as present territorial conflicts, ethnic, tribal and nationalist rivalries, problems of increasing international migration and asylum, growing regional imbalances and increasing world inequalities. Contributors to this collection, each on their own way, argues that global citizenship education needs to project new values, to reality test and debate the language, concepts and theories of global citizenship and the proto-world institutions that seek to give expression to nascent aspirations for international forms of social justice and citizen participation in world government. Many of the contributors argue that global citizenship education offers the prospect of extending the liberal ideologies of human rights and multiculturalism, and of developing a better understanding of forms of post-colonialism. One thing is sure, as the essays presented in this book demonstrate so clearly, there can be no one dominant notion of global citizenship education as notions of ‘global’, ‘citizenship’ and ‘education’ are all contested and open to further argument and revision. Global citizenship education does not name the moment of global citizenship or even its emergence so much as the hope of a form of order where the rights of the individual and of cultural groups, irrespective of race, gender, ethnicity or creed, are observed, preserved and protected by all governments in order to become the basis of citizen participation in new global spaces that we might be tempted to call global civil society.

Integrated Intelligence

Classical and Contemporary Depictions of Mind and Intelligence and their Educational Implications

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Marcus Anthony

Marcus Anthony examines theories of intelligence and consciousness, and the way in which they represent (or exclude) intuitive, spiritual and mystical experience. His argument identifies the way narrowly defined “rational” definitions of mind have come to dominate and restrict contemporary discourses in science and education. He develops the theory of integrated intelligence, an expanded model which incorporates the non-rational elements of human intelligence long missing in mainstream western discourses. Anthony indicates how and why they should be incorporated into modern education systems.

Leonardo's Vision

A Guide to Collective Thinking and Action

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Valerie A. Brown

Military Pedagogies

And why they matter

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Edited by Tone Kvernbekk, Harold Simpson and Michael A. Peters

Armed conflict is an inescapable reality in the world today. Military institutions and their activities both in peacetime and in wartime are a fact of life in western democracies and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Preparation of the men and women who are sent by their governments to fight or keep the peace is a life and death matter for those charged with the education and training of the Armed Forces. The development of military pedagogies is an attempt to address and reconcile the principles of education and military necessity. The enduring requirement is for an operationally effective yet ethically acceptable military organisation that is accountable to the society that it serves and to global ethical standards. This book provides new perspectives on the role of education in the Armed Forces of a democratic state. The wide ranging perspectives offered reflect the contributors who are from diverse professional backgrounds including serving military officers, academics and educators employed in military academies as well as social scientists. This book is aimed at those interested in policy and practice although it also provides more theoretical analyses that will interest academics and the general public.

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Peter Roberts and Michael A. Peters

This book addresses key developments in higher education and research policy over the past decade. The authors pay particular attention to policy changes in New Zealand following the formation of a Labour-Alliance coalition government in 1999. From 1999 to 2008, a version of ‘Third Way’ politics has been applied in the New Zealand context. A key government goal has been to advance New Zealand as a ‘knowledge society and economy’, and education at the tertiary level has been seen as crucial in achieving this. Neoliberalism, Higher Education and Research considers the relationship between neoliberalism and the Third Way, discusses international trends in knowledge capitalism, examines performance-based research funding, critiques the rhetoric of ‘quality’ and ‘relevance’ in recent higher education policy, and assesses possibilities for critical citizenship and intellectual life in the 21st century. Much can be learned from the New Zealand experience in reflecting on policy developments in other countries, and this book will be of interest to all who ponder the future of knowledge and education in a globalised world.

Nomadic Education

Variations on a Theme by Deleuze and Guattari

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Edited by Inna Semetsky

“This comprehensive and thoughtful volume is the first book to investigate, assess and apply a philosophy of education drawn from the great French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. It contains powerful and beautiful essays by some of the most influential Deleuze and Guattari commentators (the chapters by Bogue, Colebrook, May and Semetsky, and Genosko are particularly rewarding). The book provides very useful situations within the philosophy of education and some interesting experimental developments of Deleuze’s work, notably in terms of new technologies and original methods. This is then an indispensable work on Deleuze and education. It covers the historical background and begins shaping debates for future research in this exciting and growing area.” —Professor James Williams, Professor of European Philosophy, School of Humanities, University of Dundee, author of Gilles Deleuze’s Difference and Repetition: A Critical Introduction and Guide and The Transversal Thought of Gilles Deleuze: Encounters and Influences

“Deleuze always said that education was an erotic, voluptuous experience, perhaps the most important experience we can have. This collection captures that excitement and challenges what we think about how Deleuze should be taught and just as importantly what he taught.” —Ian Buchanan, Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory, Cardiff University, author of Deleuze and Guattari’s Anti-Oedipus and founding editor of Deleuze Studies

“Here are thirteen encounters with Deleuze’s work that not only testify of the creativity and newness of Deleuze’s own writing but that, by taking these ideas into the field of education, raise new questions, signal new problems, and provide genuinely new ways of educational thinking and being. A rich source of inspiration for anyone who believes that education should not be about the reproduction of what already exists but should be committed to what is to become.” —Gert Biesta, University of Stirling, author of Beyond Learning: Democratic Education for a Human Future; co-editor of Derrida & Education

Re-opening Einstein’s Thought

About What Can’t Be Learned From Textbooks

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Conrad P. Pritscher

During an interview conducted late in his life, the legendary Swedish Film director Ingmar Bergman was asked about the coming of age. He likened aging to hiking up the side of a mountain: “the longer one walks the more winded one becomes,” he noted. “But,” he added, “the view!” Conrad Pritscher provides us with a breathtaking view of education as it is and can be, one focal point of which is Albert Einstein’s wise views on the subject.

Semiotics in Mathematics Education

Epistemology, History, Classroom, and Culture

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Edited by Luis Radford, Gert Schubring and Falk Seeger

Current interest in semiotics is undoubtedly related to our increasing awareness that our manners of thinking and acting in our world are deeply indebted to a variety of signs and sign systems (language included) that surround us.
Since mathematics is something that we accomplish through written, oral, bodily and other signs, semiotics appears well suited to furthering our understanding of the mathematical processes of thinking, symbolizing and communicating. Resorting to different semiotic perspectives (e. g., Peirce’s, Vygotsky’s, Saussure’s), the authors of this book deal with questions about the teaching and learning of mathematics as well as the history and epistemology of the discipline. Mathematics discourse and thinking and the technologically-mediated self of mathematical cultural practices are examined through key concepts such as metaphor, intentionality, gestures, interaction, sign-use, and meaning.
The cover picture comes from Jacob Leupold’s (1727) Theatrum Arithmetico-Geometrico. It conveys the cultural, historical, and embodied aspects of mathematical thinking variously emphasized by the contributors of this book.