Iasonas Lamprianou and James A. Athanasou

This book is a natural step beyond our earlier text A Teacher’s Guide to Assessment, which was published almost six years ago. The purpose of this book is to offer a straightforward guide to educational assessment for teachers at all levels of education, including trainers and instructors. The scope of this book is wider, however, and the targeted audience is broader than the first edition. It is designed to address the needs not only of those taking a first course in educational assessment and measurement but it can also usefully serve students at the post-graduate level, as well as experienced teachers, trainers and instructors who would like to update their knowledge and acquire practical skills using relevant quantitative methods. The book is appropriate for an international audience. In this revised edition we have added new and important material which covers the assessment arrangements necessary for people with special needs and the use of technology for assessment purposes. We have elaborated on the dangers of differential item functioning; we have extended the Rasch measurement material; and enriched the book with practical examples using Microsoft Excel. The main message of the book is that assessment is not based on commonsense but on a huge body of international research and application over many years. Testing is a powerful, vital and large part of a teacher’s assessment arsenal because it can be practical, structured and very informative. The correct use of testing, either in its traditional paper-and-pencil form or in its modern technology-based style can be a formidable ally for every teacher who aspires to practise evidence-based teaching and learning.

Teachers' Professional Development

Aims, Modules, Evaluation

Edited by Frank Achtenhagen, Fritz K. Oser and Ursula Renold

Within the central topics of the debate on teachers’ professionalism are the problems of research-based and evidence-based initial and lifelong teacher behavior. Although the statements on professional similarities of teacher actions with those of other (academic) professionals are very plausible, there remains a central task for teacher education programs: How to develop towards such expertise—which is equal to evidence convictions—effectively and efficiently. Which role do scientific research and its results play in this context? How can research results be converted into recommendations for teacher actions?
The contributions to this book focus on central problems of the conversion process: In the first part the goal dimension is treated: Maiello & Oser emphasize the relationship of central variables of teacher behaviour as identity, professional satisfaction or self-efficacy to teachers’ professional behaviour; Blömeke, Felbrich & Müller discuss the role of future teachers’ beliefs on the nature of mathematics; Stevenson uses cultural historical activity theory to work out cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education; Gruber tackles the problem of how vocational teachers can be supported to become experts by discussing especially four major possible research strategies.
The second part of this book is dedicated to possible intervention approaches by which the gap of theory and practice shall be bridged. Steiner & Steiner report on critical learning incidents which heavily influence the micro-processes which characterize teachers’ instructional measures; Winther differentiates the trait and state perspective of motivation with regard to their consequences for the learning process; Boekaerts focuses on aspects of collaborative learning; Weber sharpens her deliberations explicitly to a design experiment on the problem of initiating intercultural learning.
The third part of this book is a report of the use and the consequences of Oser’s model of teaching standards. Baer, Dörr, Fraefel, Kocher, Kiester, Larcher, Müller, Sempert & Wyss show results of a large study on the development of teacher competences run in Switzerland and Germany. The study observes the competence development of prospective teachers from the beginning of their teaching training up to the job entry phase. This book is published under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology.

Rina Zazkis and Peter Liljedahl

This book presents storytelling in mathematics as a medium for creating a classroom in which mathematics is appreciated, understood, and enjoyed. The authors demonstrate how students’ mathematical activity can be engaged via storytelling. Readers are introduced to many mathematical stories of different kinds, such as stories that provide a frame or a background to mathematical problems, stories that deeply intertwine with the content, and stories that explain concepts or ideas. Moreover, the authors present a framework for creating new stories, ideas for using and enriching existing stories, as well as several techniques for storytelling that make telling more interactive and more appealing to the learner. This book is of interest for those who teach mathematics, or teach teachers to teach mathematics. It may be of interest to those who like stories or like mathematics, or those who dislike either mathematics or stories, but are ready to reconsider their position.

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Edited by Bill Green

Understanding and researching professional practice is crucial both to enhancing the quality of professional learning and to improving professional education more generally. Yet professional practice remains something that is little known, theoretically and philosophically, despite a longstanding interest in what might be called the meta-field of professional practice, learning and education.
The contributors to this book, drawn from fields such as education, allied health, psychology and business, explore different aspects of practice in the professions, professionalism, and research. This includes engaging with the burgeoning literature on practice theory and philosophy, including the increasingly influential neo-Aristotelian tradition, and taking account of growing interest in practice thinking across contemporary scholarship. It considers issues such as the primacy of practice, the nature of professional judgement, the role of ‘experience’, ethics, context, and the practitioner standpoint. As such, it raises important and timely questions about practice ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies, and also praxis and politics. This is especially needed in a context otherwise increasingly organised by neoliberalism, economic rationality, anxious managerialism, and what some see as a general drive towards de-professionalisation and new nuances and intensities of regulation.

VET Boost: Towards a Theory of Professional Competencies

Essays in Honor of Frank Achtenhagen

Edited by Fritz K. Oser, Ursula Renold, Ernst G. John, Esther Winther and Susanne Weber

The themes of the different papers in this book are related to five major areas of research. First, the book presents the work on a large-scale assessment in vocational and occupational education and training. Reason was the work of Frank Achtenhagen and his colleagues on the preparation of a VET-PISA which started in 2004 which has now become more and more a concrete program. The contributions to this part of the book contain a project description and profound presentations and discussions of measurement and evaluation problems. It reflects also the work of Achtenhagen with respect to item response theory, measurement and testing. The second part of this book presents a unique endeavour of promoting VET research: The Swiss Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology (OPET) initiated a program of Leading Houses of VET which are dedicated to different important research topics. This program might serve as example for comparable approaches in other countries. The third part highlights central issues of research on learning processes, curriculum theory and the use of technology. Here the work of Achtenhagen on competence-profile modelling, competence measurement and instructional and curriculum designing is touched. The fourth part stresses social and emotional learning as important aspects of VET learning. The fifth part considers the political and institutional dimensions of VET research which have to be taken into account when an international large-scale assessment of VET shall be getting started. Achtenhagen’s work on learning at work, leaning in economics and learning under the conditions of institutional modelling are discussed. The whole book is a collection of central issues around a field that is not yet taken enough into consideration in educational research, but pushed and supported by Frank Achtenhagen: VET research. He belongs to the founding fathers of it, and this is why precisely the book reflects new trends and new concepts with respect to the question “What can we, educational psychologists and educational researchers, learn from a rich and central research field.”

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Debbie Horsfall and Sandra Grace

Writing Qualitative Research on Practice brings together key authors in the field of qualitative research to critique current trends and expand discourse about the challenges and practices of writing qualitative research. This book is located in the context of professional practice and the practice world. It scopes and maps the broad horizons of qualitative research on practice and explores writing in major qualitative research traditions. A key issue addressed in writing qualitative research, particularly the narrative forms, is finding a way to write that encapsulates the goals and genre of the research project. Writing is presented as a process and journey and also a way of thinking and creating knowledge. Within research, writing is an essential expression of the research frame of reference and a key element of the research genre. This book explores writing for a range of publications including books, chapters, theses and papers for journals. The practical and accessible style of this book makes it an invaluable resource for postgraduate research students, teachers and supervisors and scholars of qualitative research.

Edited by Stephanie Springgay, Rita L. Irwin, Carl Leggo and Peter Gouzouasis

Being with A/r/tography is a collection of essays that explain and exemplify the arts-based research methodology called a/r/tography. Edited by four scholars who are artists, researchers, and teachers (a/r/tographers), this book is a methodology book for practitioners in arts-based educational research. In addition to an introductory essay which contextualizes and theorizes the methodological framework of a/r/tography, the book is divided into three main thematic sections that are integral to a/r/tographical research: (1) self-study and autobiography; (2) communities of a/r/tographic practice; (3) ethics and activism. The book concludes with a consideration of issues related to assessment, validity, and interpretation.
Being with A/r/tography will be an excellent core text in graduate courses that focus on arts-based educational research, as well as a valuable text in pre-service teacher education programs. The book will also be significant for qualitative research courses in all the social sciences and the health sciences, including communication studies, nursing, counseling psychology, and arts therapy. The book provides a clear and comprehensive introduction to a/r/tography. Even though a/r/tography as a research methodology is relatively new in the scholarly field, Being with A/r/tography spells out how scholarly practitioners who are artists and researchers and teachers have been pursuing this kind of research for a long time.

Children Learn Mathematics

A Learning-Teaching Trajectory with Intermediate Attainment Targets for Calculation with Whole Numbers in Primary School

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Edited by Marja van den Heuvel-Panhuizen

Improving the quality of education is an important endeavor of educational policy and TAL aims to contribute to this. TAL is a project initiated by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Sciences, and carried out by the Freudenthal Institute (FI) of Utrecht University and the Dutch National Institute for Curriculum Development (SLO), in collaboration with the Rotterdam Center for Educational Services (CED). The quality of education can be improved in many ways. TAL proposes to do this by providing insights into the broad outline of the learning-teaching process and its internal coherence. It aims to be a support for teachers alongside mathematics textbook series. Furthermore, TAL can provide extra support for teachers if it is incorporated into a circle of implementation.
The TAL project aims to describe the intermediate attainment targets of primary school mathematics.
These objectives represent a further development of, and a supplement to, the previously established core goals for the end of primary school. A defining feature of the intermediate attainment targets is that they are embedded in a learning-teaching trajectory. This is also the reason for calling the project TAL, which in Dutch stands for Tussendoelen Annex Leerlijnen; in English this means Intermediate Attainment Targets in Learning-Teaching Trajectories. The middle letter of TAL can also be considered as referring to Afbeeldingen (Representations). This term indicates that the trajectory description contains many examples of students’ and teachers’ behavior, which form an integral part of the learning-teaching trajectory. Eventually, learning-teaching trajectory descriptions will
be developed for all domains of primary school mathematics.
The present book contains the learning-teaching trajectory for the domain of whole number calculation. The book contains of one trajectory for the lower grades (kindergarten 1 and 2, and grades 1 and 2) and one for the upper grades of primary school (grades 3, 4, 5 and 6). This means that the book covers the learning process in this domain for children ranging from 4 to 12 years of age.

Edited by Michael O'Sullivan and Karen Pashby

This collection of timely articles is the first to explore the dynamics between globalization and education from a specifically Canadian perspective. The articles engage with emergent debates and new discourses around global orientations to citizenship education currently defining scholarly work and teaching practices in Canada. This book will, therefore, be of great interest to Canadian teacher educators who are seeking to infuse a global perspective into their pre-service programs as well as to globally-oriented undergraduate and graduate course instructors from a range of scholarly disciplines both in Canada and elsewhere. The Canadian perspective proves to be, not surprisingly, global in essence.
The articles contained in Citizenship Education in the Era of Globalization: Canadian Perspectives map the history of citizenship, citizenship education and global studies and probe the notion of global citizenship for its possibilities and impossibilities. Recognizing the importance of engaging with the lives of students and teachers, the contributions also include articles reporting on research and theory about such topics as the complexities of second-generation youth identity and the extent to which mainstream teachers can bring global citizenship education into their classrooms. The collection presents an engaging look into the theory and practice of citizenship education in Canada during a time when bringing global issues to the classroom is an imperative of democratic schooling.

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Edited by Anne Phelan and Jennifer Sumsion

Like other fields of study, teacher education defines itself both by what it includes and by what it excludes. Teacher educators and researchers have spent a great deal of time seeking and attempting to eradicate the flaws in existing structures and practices, but significantly less time learning to perceive the absences. The premise of this book is that until we can identify and begin to address what is absent, teacher education will be constrained by a perennial recycling of concerns that have characterized so much of research, policy and practice to date. If teacher education is to have a different future, we need to ask different and difficult questions. This book, with contributions from theorists in Australia, Canada and the United States, addresses the challenges we face in establishing a more hopeful future for teacher education. The authors’ provocative contributions identify what is ‘missing’ in teacher education while providing critical counterpoints to existing frames of reference in the field. In writing ‘against the grain’ they open up new conceptual spaces and exciting trajectories for a different teacher education.