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Social Justice Education for Teachers

Paulo Freire and the Possible Dream

Edited by Carlos Alberto Torres and Pedro Noguera

Social Justice Education for Teachers: Paulo Freire and the Possible Dream is a book that will help teachers in their commitment to and praxis of an education for social justice. The book traces the reception of Freire’s ideas in the USA, Canada, Latin America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia and provides some glimpses of topical yet seminal interventions in the philosophy of education, including studies of the relationships between Freire and Rousseau, Freire and Dewey, or Freire and Gramsci. In addition it addresses how Freire’s ideas could be implemented in urban education, both in the industrialized and developing world, and how the debates about globalization today need to addressed also with the politics of liberation as a possible dream. Three of the authors, Moacir Gadotti, Carlos Alberto Torres, and José Eustaquio Romão with the help of Paulo Freire, created the first Paulo Freire Institute in São Paulo, Brazil in 1991, and worked very closely with Freire for more than two decades, while the remaining scholars/activist are noted Freirean scholars and urban educators devoting their research, teaching and political activism to promote tools of conviviality and models of policy that will make this a better world, a less ugly world, a world, in the words of Freire, where it will be easier to love.

Towards Globo Sapiens

Transforming Learners in Higher Education

Series:

Patricia Kelly

Global and local studies show that the present growth-based approach to development is unsustainable. If we are serious about surviving the 21st century we will need graduates who are not simply 'globally portable' or even 'globally competent', but also wise global citizens, Globo sapiens. This book contributes to what educators need to know, do and be in order to support transformative learning.
The book is based on work with large, socially and culturally diverse, first-year engineering students at an Australian university of technology. It shows that reflective journals, with appropriate planning and support, can be one pillar of a transformative pedagogy which can encourage significant and even transformative attitude change in relation to gender, culture and the environment. It also offers evidence of improved communication skills and other tangible changes to counter common criticisms that such work is "airy-fairy" and irrelevant.
The author combines communication theory with critical futures thinking to provide layered understandings of how transformative learning affected students’ thinking, learning and behaviour. So the book is both a case-study and a detailed response to the personal and professional challenges that educators all over the world will face as they try to guide students in sustainable directions.

Towards Scientific Literacy

A Teachers' Guide to the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science

Derek Hodson

This book is a guide for teachers, student teachers, teacher educators, science education researchers and curriculum developers who wish to get to grips with the vast and complex literature encompassing the history of science, philosophy of science and sociology of science (HPS). A number of books cover essentially the same ground, but what makes this book unique is that it is written from the perspective of science education. The author’s purpose is twofold. First, to identify, clarify and critique elements in the HPS literature that are of key importance in developing students’scientific and technological literacy, as defined in the opening chapter of the book. Second, to enhance teachers’ capacity to build and present curricula that afford a much higher profile to HPS than has been traditional. The significance of the book can be judged from the prominence given to nature of science understanding in much recent international debate and writing in science education and in the plethora of influential reports on science and technology education published around the world that identify HPS knowledge and understanding as central components of 21st century science education.

Why Interculturalisation?

A Response to the Internationalisation of Higher Education in the Global Knowledge Economy

Series:

Xiaoping Jiang

This amazing, highly readable book breaks a new ground in revealing the dominant theories and policies that have had profound effects on the strategies to accommodate cultural diversity on university campus. Few have researched intercultural communication from macro to micro perspectives and applied a multidisciplinary approach by drawing on research from disciplines such as sociology, economics, politics, social psychology, management, communication, culture and language. This book has outlined an emerging concept of some considerable significance, interculturalisation, from a variety of contemporary perspectives, and indicated its conceptual potential in understanding the impact of higher education on globalisation, internationalisation and the knowledge economy. The book has also provided a critical assessment of the issues in globalisation and the internationalisation of higher education such as the homogenisation of cultures and the dominance of economic imperatives. In general, this book represents an original application of specialist literatures that develops certain theorisations and understandings together for the first time in a new constellation. Hence, the book provides an excellent contribution to the current interest in globalisation across disciplines, particularly to the research in intercultural communication.
It should be of great interest to philosophers, educators and researchers in the intercultural studies. This book is a significant and powerful work that is sure to invigorate interesting discussions of higher education and particularly intercultural education for years to come.
The publication of this book announces the emergence of an original approach to intercultural communication that scholars around the world will soon to appreciate.

Beyond the Modern-Postmodern Struggle in Education

Toward Counter-Education and Enduring Improvisation

Series:

Ilan Gur-Ze'ev

"This book is an attempt to historically and conceptually address the present human condition and the current specific role of education as a distinctively creative symbolic violence. In doing so, the book reevaluates the various manifestations and conflicting alternatives to normalizing education. The author suggests a unique, Diasporic, counter-education that transcends modern politics, postmodern philosophical assumptions and spiritual telos towards an impetus for the re-birth of what the author refers to as the "enduring improviser". It is a first step towards a new critical language that addresses the challenges of globalizing capitalism, of the cyberspace, of racism and of the new antisemitism that springs from postcolonialism. The book calls for a creative rearticulation of the relations between the aesthetic, the ethical, the intellectual and the bodily dimensions of the cosmos and human life. It is an invitation for a new Diasporic religiosity, one which turns courageously towards the exile of the gods. It addresses the ever-strengthening-and-tempting-sophistication of the anti-humanistic dimensions of "our" postmodern pleasure machine, of pre-modern "redemption" projects and of modern deceiving offers for "emancipation". The book is of special relevance for students of critical sociology, critical philosophy, Jewish philosophy, cultural studies, feminist studies, education—and for all friends of the free spirit.

Series:

Edited by Klas Roth and Nicholas C. Burbules

This book offers an examination into the meanings of citizenship in the contemporary world, and trends that are forcing a rethinking of the concept in today’s nation-states. These changing meanings, in turn, give rise to new understandings of, and approaches to, citizenship education. The underlying values of participation, deliberation, and loyalty or patriotism that define different notions of citizenship are under strain in a world increasingly defined by global processes, by the rise of transnational or supranational institutions, and by interconnections that bring different cultures and value systems into closer contact with each other.
What does this new citizen look like? What does this new citizen need to know, or need to be able to do? To whom, and to what, is this new citizen loyal? One way to think about this new citizen is as a cosmopolitan”, a citizen of the world more than of any particular nation-state; another way to think about it is in terms of different kinds or levels of affiliation, existing simultaneously (to nation and to regional alliance, such as the European Union, for example). These conditions of citizenship, and of citizenship education, are rapidly changing and diverse - and in some instances they come into conflict.
This collection of essays an outstanding international group of scholars examines the tensions between national, transnational, and postnational conceptions of citizenship, brought back always to the grounded question of citizenship education and how to go about it. The authors illuminate the complexity and subtlety of these issues, and offer helpful guidance for rethinking the meanings and values that inform our educational endeavours.

Series:

Edited by Cushla Kapitzke and Michael A. Peters

Knowledge is about cultural power. Considering that it is both resource and product within the brave new world of fast capitalism, this collection argues for knowledge cultures that are mutually engaged and hence more culturally inclusive and socially productive. Globalized intellectual property regimes, the privatization of information, and their counterpoint, the information and creative commons movements, constitute productive sites for the exploration of epistemologies that talk with each other rather than at and past each other. Global Knowledge Cultures provides a collection of accessible essays by some of the world’s leading legal scholars, new media analysts, techno activists, library professionals, educators and philosophers. Issues canvassed by the authors include the ownership of knowledge, open content licensing, knowledge policy, the common-wealth of learning, transnational cultural governance, and information futures. Together, they call for sustained intercultural dialogue for more ethical knowledge cultures within contexts of fast knowledge capitalism.

Nietzsche, Ethics and Education

An Account of Difference

Series:

Peter Fitzsimons

Undermining the fundamental place of freedom, equality and universal reason, Nietzsche’s philosophy recognises that we occupy multiple and contradictory subject positions within social life. With no metaphysical realm of reason, no divine inspiration for morality, and no transcendental basis for human essence, we are left with the embodied, reflective and creative self as a source of ethics. From this perspective arises Nietzsche’s Übermensch, a continuous process of overcoming and becoming, interpreted as a metaphor for education that honours difference and incorporates otherness. The book explores the development of Nietzsche’s philosophy and its application to the problems of education, disturbing traditional liberal and democratic accounts of the relationship between individual and society. Threaded throughout is the author’s critique of the way educational institutions are driven by political and economic considerations, explored through notions of autonomy and subjectivity. The book is suitable for graduate students and academics wanting to engage either with postmodern interpretations of ethics in education, or with political philosophy in relation to development of self and community.

On Marx

An Introduction to the Revolutionary Intellect of Karl Marx

Series:

Paula Allman

On Marx introduces readers to the greatest intellect of the last millennium. Anyone who finds the 21st Century daunting, bewildering even frightening, or conversely, who has been too comfortable with the easy answers proffered by governments and the media, will discover that Marx provides unparalleled understanding and clarity as well as inspiration for engaging collectively in a type of praxis that holds the promise of both self and socio-economic transformation. We all live in the world of global capitalism, and no one has explained better than Marx how capitalism works, how it develops—now and in the future—and the consequences to be expected from the unfolding of its inner contradictions—from the growth of global poverty, the widening gap between the rich and the poor to the proliferation of endless war and environmental destruction.
On Marx also enables readers to distinguish between the real genius of Marx ‘s thought and a range of ideas that have been erroneously attributed to him and which, unfortunately, have clouded many people’s judgement of Marx. According to the author, if humanity is to have a chance for hope and ultimately peace and socio-economic justice, we need to open our minds to Marx—to give Marx a chance.

Prospects of Higher Education

Globalization, Market Competition, Public Goods and the Future of the University

Series:

Edited by Simon Marginson

As common global problems accumulate, research and higher education become ever more vital. At the same time global convergence is transforming the prospects of higher education institutions. Local and national affairs are no longer the ultimate horizon, creating much scope for cross-border initiative and invention in both knowledge and university strategy. Yet the new freedoms are not experienced equally in all localities. Differences between nations are still determining. As the older barriers are stripped away this enhances the capacity of strong universities and systems to dominate the rest, though new players are emerging. There are many possible trajectories for the university.
The future is open and the 22 authors in Prospects of Higher Education explore it from three perspectives: the world as a whole, the Americas, and particular localities and regions. Moving beyond nation-centered analysis of states and markets, Prospects uses concepts of public and private goods to map the potentials for global trade and university rankings, common knowledge benefits and multilateral policy action, national stratification and the wash-back effects in systems and institutions. Broad and imaginative, methodologically innovative and policy sharp, this book has much for government and university leaders, scholars of higher education and anyone interested in public policy.