Ethics in the Science and Technology Classroom

A New Approach to Teaching and Learning

Edited by Alister Jones, Anne McKim and Michael J. Reiss

This edited book on ethics represents the outcomes of an international collaborative project that examined the role and place of bioethics in science and technology curricula. As science and technology advance, ethical issues increasingly are brought to the fore not only both for scientists and technologists but also for the general public. Science and technology education also reflects this shift and thinking and teaching about ethics in the school curriculum has increased. A greater emphasis is being placed on society’s general scientific and technological literacy and this includes an understanding of socio-scientific issues including ethical decision-making. Although this book has a focus on ethics in the school science and technology curriculum, we believe it will also prove useful for those thinking about ethical decision making in a range of contexts outside of the school sector. The book will prove useful for University lecturers, teachers, curriculum developers and policy makers and those that are involved in science and technology decision making more broadly.

Erik Jan van Rossum and Rebecca Hamer

The Meaning of Learning and Knowing, co-authored by Erik Jan van Rossum and Rebecca Hamer, brings together empirical studies on epistemology, student thinking, teacher thinking, educational policy and staff development forging a solid and practical foundation for educational innovation. Since the 1980s they developed and published about a six-stage developmental model describing the qualitatively different ways students and teachers view learning and good teaching. A model with far reaching consequences for education, educational innovation and democratic society. Their comprehensive review of research from many disciplines underpins the empirical evidence of over 650 students and teachers. Each of the six worldviews results in a unique way of meaning making. These six Ways of Knowing, or Orders of Consciousness, are characterised by increasing complexity of thinking, with fourth level thinking—or self-authorship—representing the most common espoused goal of higher education. Ample evidence is presented that higher education is not attaining its own espoused goals. One explanation may be that many teachers in higher education have not themselves reached the minimum required way of knowing, preventing them from constructing a developmental path for their students. Van Rossum and Hamer’s epistemological model provides clear signposts on the developmental education highway and has proven its worth as an instrument for curriculum design, measurement of epistemological development and as a tool for staff development.

Wayne Melville

The ubiquitous science department occupies an unusual position in most secondary schools. Traditionally, they have been part of the organisational structure of schools, with administrative responsibilities over room allocations, teaching assignments and the management of laboratory equipment. These are important roles, but they only tell half the story. Science teachers are more than members of an organisational structure. They are also members of a science education community which is shaped by their shared understanding of science. The science department as community also possesses a pivotal, if undervalued, role in teacher professional learning.
This book conceptualises professional learning as the engagement of teachers in a virtues-based personal reflection and/or public discourse around the episteme, techne and phronesis in the spaces ‘in-between’ the metaphors of understanding community: meanings, practice, and identity. As such, it speaks to heads of science departments, school administrators and those with an interest in leadership within schools.

Operieren mit Zeit

Empirie und Theorie von Zeitstrukturen in Lehr-Lernprozessen

Kathrin Berdelmann

In Lehr-Lernprozessen kommt dem Faktor Zeit eine überragende Bedeutung zu, da Lehren und Lernen als zeitliche Prozesse Synchronisation erfordern.
In diesem Buch wird erstmals ein empirisch fundiertes Modell von Zeitstrukturen entwickelt. Ausgehend von der Operativen Pädagogik werden Formen der Synchronisation des Lehrens und Lernens identifiziert und analysiert. In diesem Zusammenhang stellt die Studie auch die Rückseite der Synchronisation, Asynchronisation, als zentrales Moment heraus. Indem aufgezeigt wird, dass in Lehr-Lernprozessen asynchrone Momente unverzichtbar sind, erscheint die Differenz von 'subjektiver' und 'objektiver' Zeit nicht länger als pädagogisches Problem. Vielmehr stellt sich eine Vielfalt divergierender Zeitstrukturen als strukturelle Voraussetzung für die Realisierung von Lehr-Lernprozessen dar. Diese sind durch eine relative zeitliche Koordination gekennzeichnet: durch das dynamische und flexible Oszillieren zwischen Synchronisation und Asynchronisation.

Lesesozialisation

Ein Arbeitsbuch für Lehramtsstudierende

Christine Garbe, Maik Philipp and Nele Ohlsen

Edited by Christine Garbe

Schulabsentismus und Drop-out

Erscheinungsformen - Erklärungsansätze - Intervention

Series:

M. Wittrock, Gisela Schulze and Heinrich Ricking

Edited by Manfred Wittrock

Drawn Toward Transformation

Conversations on Teaching and Learning Drawing

Nadine Kalin

This book examines the transformative potential of collaborative teacher research. Specifically, Kalin shares the perspectives of educators as they investigate the teaching and learning of drawing within their own elementary classrooms and within the context of an action research group. The innovative a/r/tographic design of the project provides a rich balance between the arts and educational research,
as it allows for the complex unfolding of relational transformation, alongside the artistic renditions of each person exploring their understandings of drawing. The products and processes of this book provide alternative approaches for the design of future pre-service and in-service programs that aim to serve teachers as learners rather than teachers as teachers. In this vein, the book offers worthy insights into how the arts and collaborative action research groups assist participants in finding other ways of seeing, imaging, and knowing the world. The book will appeal to practitioners, teacher educators, educational researchers, as well as those interested in professional development, complexity thinking, curriculum studies, collaborative action research, and arts-based educational research methodologies.

Edited by Jinfa Cai, Gabriele Kaiser, Bob Perry and Ngai-Ying Wong

What is effective mathematics teaching? This book represents the first purposeful cross-cultural collection of studies to answer this question from teachers’ perspectives. It focuses particularly on how teachers view effective teaching of mathematics. Teachers’ voices are heard and celebrated throughout the studies reported in this volume. These studies are drawn from many parts of the world representing both Eastern and Western cultural traditions. The editors and authors have deliberately included the views of teachers and educators from different cultural backgrounds, taking into account that beliefs on effective mathematics teaching and its features are highly influenced by one’s own culture.
The book will provide readers and scholars with the stimulus to take the ideas presented and expand on them in ways that help improve mathematics education for children, teachers and researchers in both the East and the West.

Evidence-Based Teaching

Strategies that Promote Learning

Robyn M. Gillies

Public school systems are now under increasing pressure to close achievement gaps between the able and less-able students, minority and non-minority students, and disadvantaged students and their non-disadvantaged peers. Moreover, there is now an expectation that schools and teachers will use those programs and practices that have been demonstrated to be are efficacious through rigorous scientific research.
Evidence-based teaching: Strategies that promote learning is designed to provide teachers with an overview of the types of evidence that can be used to enhance their teaching practices. It does this by documenting those practices that have been used effectively in classrooms to facilitate how teachers teach and how students learn. This text is designed to make teachers aware of how to critically evaluate different types of evidence that can be used to inform their teaching practice. It achieves this by making explicit the link between theory, research and practice.

Bryant Griffith

The craft of teaching and learning is like playing in a symphony orchestra; every instrument has a voice and every voice is integral to the whole. The arts, history, anthropology, and philosophy and their forged discourses offer us a series of cautionary tales about the multiplicity of ways we can see and understand our world, ways we often ignore in the classroom. In the case of epistemology, and pedagogy in particular, we have hinged our understanding on a binary of opposites engaged in a dialectic dance and a type of discourse constructed to describe and explain it. The art and act of teaching in this as-if world necessitates teachers to be public intellectuals; intellectual symbols who represent something more than just subject-knowledge expertise but serve as conduits between the discourses of our world.
Established genres and discourses are exclusionary. The vast migration of people and ideas is producing a new set of presuppositions. The manner in which we decode other discourses and fuse them into meanings, both personal and shared, is the root of both teaching and learning, giving us a window into the way that each form of thought is connected, both historically and experientially. Look around you, your school is becoming the United Nations, but it’s not so united. Don’t aim for truth, aim for understanding. Today’s students construct and deconstruct in a multitude of ways on an as-needed, just-in-time basis. Since ideas of difference are often nudged but unacknowledged, we are in danger of becoming pedagogical dinosaurs, not heeding change until it is too late.
Teaching and learning are construction zones, so get out your hard hat. These constructions are possibilities that need to be discussed and negotiated, allowing us to sidestep the traps of grand narratives and a hierarchy of discplinarity and research methodology. Our possibilities need to be forged on an anvil of diversity. These are the spaces, the interstices, where our voices become innovative and our silence offers a safe harbor. Spaces to listen, collaborate, and craft cautionary tales about our lives and the possibilities for a shared future.