#HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education

Volume 1: Hip-hop as Education, Philosophy, and Practice

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Edited by Christopher Emdin and Edmund S. Adjapong

The first volume of #HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education brings together veteran and emerging scholars, practitioners and students from a variety of fields to share their research and experiences as it relates to the use of hip-hop in educational spaces. This text extends the current literature on hip-hop and education and focuses on the philosophy of hip-hop and education, the impact that hip-hop culture has on the identity of educators, and the use of hip-hop to inform mental health practices. Through their personal and practical experiences, authors of this text will spark new and creative uses of hip-hop culture in educational spaces.

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Edited by Norvella P. Carter and Michael Vavrus

In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.

Revolutionizing Urban Education

Hip Hop, Pedagogy, and Communities

This series consists of books written for all stakeholders in education including undergraduate and graduate students of education, teachers, parents, and the community at large. The volumes bridge research, theory, personal anecdotes and practice, and interrogates and provides recommendations for schools and communities, specifically in urban spaces. Books in this series focus on utilizing hip-hop as education to transform urban education and schools, and to introduce critical pedagogical ways to engage communities, and schools. Educators, students, community members, and academics are given opportunities to understand the essential nature of voice and activism. This work is necessary to transform schools and communities to better represent the young people they were built to serve.

A Man Comes from Someplace

Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time. Second Edition

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Judith Pearl Summerfield

A Man Comes from Someplace is a story of a lost world, a story in history of a multi-generational Jewish family from a shtetl in Ukraine before WWI. As cultural study, the narrative draws upon the oral stories of the author’s father, family letters, eyewitness accounts, immigration papers, etc., and cultural research. The narrative becomes a transformative space to re-present story as performance, a meta-narrative, and an auto-ethnography for the author to reflect upon the effects of the stories on her own life, as daughter of a survivor, and as teacher/scholar. Summerfield raises questions about immigration, survival, resilience, place and identity, how story functions as antidote to trauma, a means of making sense of the world, and as resistance, the refusal to be silenced or erased, the insistence we know the past and remember those who came before. In 2011, she found her way back to the place her family came from in Ukraine. The book is now being read by students in their ESL classes in Novokoonstantinov, Ukraine.

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Edited by Yeping Li and Rongjin Huang

While the importance of knowledge for effective instruction has long been acknowledged, and the concept and structure of mathematics knowledge for teaching are far from being new, the process of such knowledge acquisition and improvement remains underexplored empirically and theoretically. The difficulty can well associate with the fact that different education systems embody different values for what mathematics teachers need to learn and how they can be assisted to develop their knowledge. To improve this situation with needed consideration about a system context and policies, How Chinese Acquire and Improve Mathematics Knowledge for Teaching takes a unique approach to present new research that views knowledge acquisition and improvement as part of teachers’ life-long professional learning process in China. The book includes such chapters that can help readers to make possible connections of teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching in China with educational policies and program structures for mathematics teacher education in that system context.

How Chinese Acquire and Improve Mathematics Knowledge for Teaching brings invaluable inspirations and insights to mathematics educators and teacher educators who wish to help teachers improve their knowledge, and to researchers who study this important topic beyond a static knowledge conception.

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Edited by Mark A. Fabrizi

Horror Literature and Dark Fantasy: Challenging Genres is a collection of scholarly essays intended to address the parent whose unreasoning opposition to horror entails its removal from a school curriculum, the school administrator who sees little or no redeeming literary value in horror, and the teacher who wants to use horror to teach critical literacy skills but does not know how to do so effectively. The essays herein are intended to offer opportunities for teachers in secondary schools and higher education to enrich their classes through a non-canonical approach to literary study. This book is a deliberate attempt to enlarge the conversation surrounding works of horror and argue for their inclusion into school curricula to teach students critical literacy skills.

Bildung und soziale Bewegung

Die brasilianische Landlosenbewegung und das Weltsozialforum als Räume für Bildungsprozesse

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Benjamin Bunk

Soziale Bewegungen sind zentrale Akteure unserer Zeit. In und durch Soziale Bewegungen findet Bildung statt, wie anhand zweier Modelle aufgezeigt wird.
Wie findet Bildung in Sozialer Bewegung statt? Die brasilianische Landlosenbewegung »Movimento dos Sem Terra« und das Weltsozialforum repräsentieren zwei Modelle, anhand derer diese Frage beantwortet werden kann. Eine bildungstheoretische Perspektive betrachtet Soziale Bewegungen vor allem als soziale Praxis, an der Menschen teilhaben und durch sie in ihrer Biographie geprägt werden. Dieser sozial-anthropologische Zugang steht innerhalb der Bewegungsforschung neben Ansätzen, die primär nach den gesellschaftlichen Ursachen oder politischen Wirkungen Sozialer Bewegungen fragen. Als kollektive, gestaltbare und sich selbst bildende Akteure kommt den Sozialen Bewegungen eine wichtige Rolle in der Vermittlung zwischen Bildung und Kultur zu.

Looking Back and Living Forward

Indigenous Research Rising Up

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Edited by Jennifer Markides and Laura Forsythe

Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up brings together research from a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The work shared in this book is done by and with Indigenous peoples, from across Canada and around the world. Together, the collaborators’ voices resonate with urgency and insights towards resistance and resurgence.

The various chapters address historical legacies, environmental concerns, community needs, wisdom teachings, legal issues, personal journeys, educational implications, and more. In these offerings, the contributors share the findings from their literature surveys, document analyses, community-based projects, self-studies, and work with knowledge keepers and elders. The scholarship draws on the teachings of the past, experiences of the present, and will undoubtedly inform research to come.

Writing Hope Strategies for Writing Success in Secondary Schools

A Strengths-Based Approach to Teaching Writing

Nicole Sieben

This book provides ways of thinking about the teaching of writing in secondary schools (with applications to college writing) and shares research-based strategies for immediate use in the classroom. The strengths-based, classroom-tested, student-centered writing hope strategies shared within the Writing Hope Framework (WHF) are designed to allow students to work within their own unique writing processes and insert their individual writers’ voices and styles authentically. The Writing Hope Framework allows students to choose which strategies and stages of the writing process they wish to engage in for purposeful writing goal attainment; it recognizes unique writing approaches and accounts for these differences in curricular design and implementation. Teachers can assess the writing abilities and self-beliefs of the students in their classes using a variety of strategies provided and then guide students in their pathways selection processes for writing.
Given the nature of this research and its application, it is the intention of this book to bring readers through a process of hope that can facilitate life hope and writing hope in the classroom for and with students. Hope is not exclusively for the already hopeful students; it is also, and perhaps more critically, for those students who do not presently see hope in their lives but who can. Every student is capable of hope if it is facilitated effectively and purposefully.

Actions of Their Own to Learn

Studies in Knowing, Acting, and Being

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Edited by Bonnie Shapiro

What does it mean to take actions of one’s own to learn? How do human beings create meaning for themselves and with others? How can learners’ active efforts to build knowledge be encouraged and supported?

In this edited compilation, scholars from a diverse range of academic and professional backgrounds address these questions, grounded in the conviction that the ability to take effective action of one’s own to learn is itself an essential form of knowledge.

In an era of dramatic social, environmental and political change, the need to access vast amounts of information to make decisions demands that learners become active agents in their own knowledge development. Educators are transforming ideas about their role(s) as they strive to provide guidance to help learners take the lead in their own learning. Learners are building new ideas about their capacities to gather and organize information while working with others. No longer simply consumers of information, they are beginning to see themselves as capable and effective researchers. Researchers are also expanding ideas about their knowledge-gathering work and identities. No longer simply reporters of information, researchers are seeing themselves as learners, as they engage in deeper, more collaborative ways with participants in their research.

Chapter authors describe their dedicated, and often career long journeys to show the vital connections between knowledge, acting to learn, identity and being. To engage in this work means disrupting traditional ideas about how knowledge is most effectively acquired. This book will inspire researchers, educators and educational planners as they build the kinds of new participative structures needed to support individual and collective actions to learn.