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New Currents through John

A Global Perspective

Series:

Francisco Lozada and Tom Thatcher

New Currents through John brings into focus the dramatic changes in method that have taken place in Johannine studies in the past fifty years. Written in light of John A. T. Robinson’s analysis of the “New Look” in the Johannine scholarship of fifty years ago, each essay in this volume engages a current issue in contemporary research. Contributions from a diversity of voices and perspectives reflect the increasing globalization of theological dialogue. Highlighting the work of emerging scholars against the backdrop of traditional perspectives, this volume also forecasts trends in Johannine scholarship for the next several decades. The contributors are Armand Barus, Jaime Clark-Soles, Carsten Claussen, Mary L. Coloe, R. Alan Culpepper, Brian D. Johnson, Matthew Kraus, Francisco Lozada Jr., Beth M. Sheppard, Yak-hwee Tan, and Tom Thatcher.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Series:

Douglas Knight

In the latest edition of this classic work, Knight presents a thorough history and analysis of the exegetical method known in Hebrew Bible studies as tradition history or traditio-historical criticism, the capstone of the historical-critical methods. Beginning in the seventeenth–nineteenth centuries with early notions that some form of oral tradition may have preceded the writing of biblical literature, scholars from the start of the twentieth century forward became increasingly intrigued with the idea that the creative period for much of the material lay in the long and intricate process of tradition growth rather than in the actual writing stage. The unfolding of scholarship in this field took distinctive forms in various contexts, especially in Scandinavian research, which is here assessed in light of many untranslated studies. This third edition, largely reproducing the original publication from 1973, is augmented by an epilogue arguing that several methods and issues developed in the period since the 1970s have now problematized past traditio-historical work in unavoidable yet also stimulating ways.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

The Reality of Apocalypse

Rhetoric and Politics in the Book of Revelation

Series:

David L. Barr

Far from spinning a fantasy of what will never be, the book of Revelation depicts an alternate social world in order to shape the community and individual identity of an audience living under imperial rule. To highlight the Apocalypse’s meaning for its original audience, this volume focuses on two interrelated themes pulsing throughout Revelation: rhetoric and politics. It considers rhetorical strategies and tactics in Revelation and demonstrates how its rhetoric fits the situation in Roman Asia Minor and the struggle within the Apocalypse community. It also examines community and cultural conflicts, showing how myth, symbol, and liturgy function as means of resistance in an imperial setting. By offering a fresh window on the lively interplay between imagination and history, between words and worlds, this volume will be indispensable for anyone seeking to understand current scholarly analysis of the book of Revelation. The contributors are Gregory L. Linton, David E. Aune, David L. Barr, Greg Carey, Paul Duff, Steven J. Friesen, Jan Willem van Henten, Edith M. Humphrey, Jean-Pierre Ruiz, and Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

The Recycled Bible

Autobiography, Culture, and the Space Between

Series:

Edited by Fiona Black

The essays in this volume trace the Bible as it is “recycled” through a wide range of Western cultural “texts,” from beer to the devil—and much in between. They consciously and critically employ the personal voice to explore the interplay between culture and biblical texts. To this end, the essays occupy “the space between” the two discourses of autobiographical and cultural criticism, interacting with each in a variety of ways, and to a variety of depths. Taken together, they illustrate the breadth of these recent approaches to the Bible as well as some of the marvelous creativity that has become the hallmark of this kind of work. The contributors are George Aichele, Fiona C. Black, Roland Boer, Deborah Krause, Ela Nutu, Tina Pippin, Hugh S. Pyper, Erin Runions, James A. Smith, and Andrew Wilson.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

The Rituals and Myths of the Feast of the Goodly Gods of KTU/CAT 1.23

Royal Constructions of Opposition, Intersection, Integration, and Domination

Series:

Mark Smith

In a fresh, in-depth study of the Ugaritic text often called “The Birth of the Beautiful Gods,” Smith applies the tools of detailed philological analysis and recent theoretical advances in the study of myth and ritual to illuminate this text as a sophisticated, integrated whole. In a series of rituals and myths, “The Feast of the Goodly Gods” captures a ritual moment of cosmic integration between the beneficial deities and the destructive cosmic enemies, in particular the gods after whom the text is named. This important volume not only brings the world of this fascinating Ugaritic text to life, setting it clearly within its royal context, but also provides a model for the integration of philological analysis and contemporary theories especially ritual studies in the interpretation of ancient texts, including the Bible.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Theodoret of Cyrus

Commentary on Daniel

Series:

Robert C. Hill

Early Christians were fed by their pastors a solidly scriptural diet from both the Old and the New Testaments. The commentary on Daniel by Theodoret, a member of the school of Antioch and fifth-century bishop of Cyrus, illustrates the typically Antiochene approach to biblical texts and shows the commentator posing key questions such as, What is prophecy? or What does a prophet do? While demonstrating the moderation for which his approach to the Bible became proverbial, Theodoret here instructs his readers to see in the dreams and visions of Daniel the pattern of prediction and fulfillment that guarantees for an Antiochene the authenticity of true prophecy. This commentary, with Greek text and English translation on facing pages, will be valuable to biblical and patristic scholars, theologians, and church historians.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Edited by Kocku von Stuckrad

The new and impressively comprehensive Brill Dictionary of Religion addresses religion as an element of daily life and public discourse. Richly illustrated and with more than 500 entries, the dictionary is a multi-media reference source on the many and various forms of religious commitment. It is unusual in that it not only addresses the different theologies and doctrinal declarations of the official institutionalized religions but it also gives equal weight and consideration to a multiplicity of other religious phenomena.
People perceive and express religious experiences in many different ways: through dance, sensuality, in relations between sexes and in compassion at death. Religions help determine how people form and perceive their identity as part of a social group. The diverse effects of religions can also be perceived in the environment, society and the public sphere. The Brill Dictionary of Religion helps map out and define the networks and connections created by various religions in contemporary societies, and provides models for understanding these complex phenomena.

Reading the Present in the Qumran Library

The Perception of the Contemporary by Means of Scriptural Interpretations

Series:

Edited by Kristin de Troyer and Armin Lange

How did ancient scribes interpret their own reality by means of scriptural exegesis? The essays in this volume explore this question from various perspectives by examining the earliest known exegetical texts of Jewish origin, namely, the exegetical texts from the Qumran library. Scholars have debated the precise nature of the exegetical techniques used in the Qumran texts. To bring clarity to the discussion, this book analyzes the phenomenon of reading the present in the Qumran library and asks how far comparable phenomena can be observed in authoritative literature in ancient Israel and Judah, in the textual tradition of the Hebrew and Greek Bible, in ancient Judaism, and in early Christian literature.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Teaching the Bible

Practical Strategies for Classroom Instruction

Series:

Edited by Mark Roncace and Patrick Gray

While books on pedagogy in a theoretical mode have proliferated in recent years, there have been few that offer practical, specific ideas for teaching particular biblical texts. To address this need, Teaching the Bible, a collection of ideas and activities written by dozens of innovative college and seminary professors, outlines effective classroom strategies—with a focus on active learning—for the new teacher and veteran professor alike. It includes everything from ways to incorporate film, literature, art, and music to classroom writing assignments and exercises for groups and individuals. The book assumes an academic approach to the Bible but represents a wide range of methodological, theological, and ideological perspectives. This volume is an indispensable resource for anyone who teaches classes on the Bible.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)

Series:

Casey Elledge

The Dead Sea Scrolls have revolutionized our understanding of the literature of the Hebrew Bible, Second Temple Judaism, and the New Testament. The study of the Scrolls is now essential for understanding the history and transmission of the earliest biblical manuscripts, the development of apocalyptic and wisdom writings, and the rise of Jewish messianism—to name only a few of the most important areas of biblical literature to which the Scrolls have made an enduring contribution. As the importance of the Scrolls has increased over the past decades, the scholarly literature has increased exponentially. This brief yet thorough book highlights the most important contributions the Scrolls have made to the study of the Bible and charts new territory for future research into the Scrolls and the Qumran community. After reading The Bible and the Dead Sea Scrolls, students and scholars alike will have the basic understanding of the Scrolls necessary for pondering even deeper questions regarding the history, literature, and theology of the Bible.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org)