Getting Involved

Global Citizenship Development and Sources of Moral Values

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Edited by Fritz K. Oser and Wiel Veugelers

Getting involved' in society means becoming a human person by doing something for others and thus being connected to mankind and society. Youngsters who get involved, give meaning to life and develop a feeling of agency. But ‘getting involved’ is not easy. Getting involved’ is necessary for living together, creating democracy and sustainability of a global world. The paradox is that in a modern, multicultural society ‘getting involved’ is even more important than in a traditional, more monocultural society.
‘Getting involved’ relates to various scientific orientations. Political, sociological, psychological and pedagogical questions are at issue, and all of these will be consulted in this volume. The main perspective however remains the issue of identity development relating to ‘getting involved’, and will therefore be psychological.
This book gives a broad overview of current research in the field of moral development and citizenship. It shows the diversity of concepts, research methodologies, and educational practices. The book also shows the influence of local social, cultural and political contexts.
The book can help researchers, teacher educators, politicians and practitioners in finding new and better ways of supporting youngsters in their moral and civic identity development.

The Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Volume 4

The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional

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Edited by Barbara Jaworski and Terry Wood

The Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education, the first of its kind, addresses the learning of mathematics teachers at all levels of schooling to teach mathematics, and the provision of activity and programmes in which this learning can take place. It consists of four volumes.
Volume 4 of this handbook has the title The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. The volume seeks to complement the other three volumes by focusing on knowledge and roles of teacher educators working with teachers in teacher education processes and practices. In this respect it is unique. Chapter authors represent a community of teacher educators world wide who can speak from practical, professional and theoretical viewpoints about what it means to promote teacher education practice.
The volume is in 3 main sections. In the first we focus on Challenges to and Theory in Mathematics Teacher Education. Here authors write from perspectives of theory and/or challenge and relate this to examples and insights from their practice. The second section, Reflection On Developing as a Mathematics Teacher Educator has four autobiographical chapters in which authors delineate their experiences as teacher educators and relate these to theoretical and/or moral standpoints. In Section 3, Working With Prospective and Practising Teachers: What We Learn; What We Come to Know, authors write from perspectives on practice—in many cases, the practices in which they themselves have engaged—and relate this to theoretical perspectives and rationales for teacher education programmes.
The volume also has an introductory chapter in which the purpose and content of the volume is set out, and a final chapter that syntheses themes and issues from the chapters as a whole, offering an overview of the field and suggesting future directions.
Bibliographical Information for the complete set:
VOLUME 1:
Knowledge and Beliefs in Mathematics Teaching and Teaching Development
Peter Sullivan, Monash University, Clayton, Australia and Terry Wood, Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA (eds. )
paperback: 978-90-8790-541-5, hardback: 978-90-8790-542-2, ebook: 978-90-8790-543-9
VOLUME 2:
Tools and Processes in Mathematics Teacher Education
Dina Tirosh, Tel Aviv University, Israel and Terry Wood, Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA (eds. )
paperback: 978-90-8790-544-6, hardback: 978-90-8790-545-3, ebook: 978-90-8790-546-0
VOLUME 3:
Participants in Mathematics Teacher Education: Individuals, Teams, Communities and Networks
Konrad Krainer, University of Klagenfurt, Austria and Terry Wood, Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA (eds. )
paperback: 978-90-8790-547-7, hardback: 978-90-8790-548-4, ebook: 978-90-8790-549-1
VOLUME 4:
The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional
Barbara Jaworski, Loughborough University, UK and Terry Wood, Purdue University, West Lafayette, USA (eds. )
paperback: 978-90-8790-550-7, hardback: 978-90-8790-551-4, ebook: 978-90-8790-552-1

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Ivor F. Goodson

Investigating the Teacher’s Life and Work attempts to bring together the methodological and substantive aspects of studying the teacher’s life and work. Some of the chapters in the book provide a “how to do” approach for those wishing to study the teacher’s life and work employing a life history method; whilst other chapters provide the kind of substantive and generic findings which might be anticipated when conducting life history work.
The focus on professional life and work has been growing rapidly in the last two or three decades. There are a number of reasons for this. Firstly there is a methodological impulse; many new studies are adopting a life history approach. The life history tradition aims to understand the interface between people’s life and their work. It also seeks to explore the historical context and the socio-political circumstances in which people’s life and work is located.
A further major reason for investigating the teacher’s life and work at the moment is the huge range of restructuring initiatives taking place throughout the educational world. There is a kind of ‘world movement’ to restructure education and health—certainly in most Western countries. Generally this takes the form of the introduction of the three T’s—targets, tests and tables—and the increasing accountability and performativity regimes associated with these new forms of evaluation.
Significantly these initiatives have been introduced at governmental level in most countries with the minimum of consultation with teacher workforces. As a result there is growing evidence of a clash between professional life and work missions and the restructuring initiatives which aim to transform these missions. Perhaps the best way to explore this increasingly acute clash of values is through the investigation of professional life and work.
Investigating the Teacher’s Life and Work aims to bring together the methodological and substantive approaches and to show how this kind of study can increase our understanding of the interface between government intentions and teacher’s beliefs and motives.

Edited by Phillip A. Towndrow, Caroline Koh and Tan Hock Soon

Motivation and Practice for the Classroom is a book for everyone concerned with the study of motivation in education. Although there have been a number of notable contributions to the literature attempting to explain how students could excel in learning if only the conditions were right, a perennial problem for teachers is putting these ideas into practice in their classrooms. What seems to be lacking in the literature are evidence-based claims about pedagogy and practice that are grounded in educational research at the classroom level and written in a style that is manageable for busy, non-specialist teachers.
The main theme of this edited volume is on aspects of motivation that are of relevance and application to the teaching practitioner. It would also be useful to student-teachers, school administrators, tertiary education lecturers, educational researchers and school administrators. The collection of articles in this reader seeks to address one essential question: how can classroom-based research findings be used to improve the quality of teaching and motivation of students?

Nurturing Praxis

Action Research in Partnerships between School and University in a Nordic Light

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Edited by Karin Rönnerman, Eli Moksnes Furu and Petri Salo

Nurturing Praxis offers a distinctive view of collaborative and action research in educational settings in four Nordic countries; Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland. Educational action research in Nordic countries is interpreted as being informed by the traditions of Bildung and (folk) enlightenment and thereby emphasizing the importance of collaboration, discussion and dialogue in knowledge creation. It explores the professional development of teachers, especially through school-university partnerships in which university researchers collaborate with teachers in a variety of educational settings in order to bring about change in and better understanding of practice. It presents case studies of professional development in the context educational reform and change, originating from both inside and outside schools, and tackled with or enhanced by collaborative and action research. By analysing the cases in the light of the Nordic traditions of Bildung and (folk) enlightenment, the authors have been able to identify a number of key features of professional development enhanced by collaborative and action research. These features are drawn together in the last chapter, in a comprehensive framework for Nurturing Praxis.

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Tibbi Duboys

Paths to Teaching the Holocaust edited by Tibbi Duboys is an important new book. It offers contributions by childhood, middle and secondary teacher educators from various regions and universities in the continental United States. The array of material is a strength of this unique book. Some contributors write about ways in which they infuse existing courses with Holocaust materials, while others focus on where and when to begin the education of their students with respect to genocide. Curriculum and instruction are examined from the perspective of existing research. Preparing oneself to teach the material and personal teaching style are presented in ways that will be helpful both to new and to experienced teachers and those interested in the kinds of questions embedded in this material.
Educators and others will see how events focused upon in the Holocaust are connected to violations of human rights and social justice committed during the period of National Socialism. Readers are reminded of the approximate nature of knowledge when it is not born of lived experience, and are invited to raise questions about the Holocaust and other genocides.
The varied nature of the chapters offers a platform for engaging in discourse likely to pique the interest of people who have limited experience with the topic, and of those whose knowledge may be rich and of long standing. Teachers often seek to bridge the gap between theory and practice, and will find the References of each writer an invaluable resource. The contents of Paths to Teaching the Holocaust will be useful to educators and others concerned with oppression, human rights and social justice.

Power, Pedagogy and Praxis

Social Justice in the Globalized Classroom

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Edited by Shannon A. Moore and Richard C. Mitchell

The aim of the text is to respond to gaps in an emergent discourse running along minority/majority world fault lines through various perspectives linking globalization, education and human rights. The editors’standpoint allows the consideration of equity in education as the foremost expression of social justice in this era of economic and technological globalization regardless of political or cultural contexts. This project continues the tradition of critical social pedagogy in creating common ground that accesses new approaches to political and classroom-based relations of power and praxis.

Professional Care and Vocation

Cultivating Ethical Sensibilities in Teaching

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Timothy W. Wineberg

This book integrates the traditional understanding of a profession—a calling to selfless service for the public good, through the pursuit of a learned art—with that of vocation—work that offers a deep sense of personal fulfilment, meaning, and identity. Professions are moral endeavours since they require vulnerable individuals to trust in the competence and integrity of someone who professes to care for them. Currently, most versions of professional ethics narrowly focus upon standards of conduct or upon ethical dilemmas. Yet these are rarely compelling enough to change us—they are not morally formative.
This volume takes a different tack to doing ethics. It explicitly targets the moral development of educators. This is crucial because as we develop our sensibilities of perception and qualities of character, we can better interpret practice situations and respond fittingly. Moreover, this approach to ethics seeks to reconceptualize our professional obligation: to embody it in more adequate metaphors, and to revitalize its relational dimension. In this view, our task as educators is to seek out those relational metaphors, images, and narratives of practice which are profound enough to shape our self-perceptions and to fund our moral formation. This book explores five ethical spheres—sacrifice, community, craft, tradition, and moral imagination—and five respective pedagogical images which illuminate the nature of professional care—servant, moral friend, mentor, covenantor, and moral companion. When critically engaged and appropriated, these rich metaphorical images provide clarity, order, and meaning to our perceptions and powerful imperatives for our own moral development.

Students in Action

Cogeneratives Dialogues from Secondary to Elementary Schools

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Ian Stith and Wolff-Michael Roth

This book chronicles our work on cogenerative dialoguing in high schools and an elementary school. Cogenerative dialoguing brings together students, teachers, and other relevant stakeholders in the educational enterprise to make sense of some common teaching—learning experiences and issues arising thereof in order to design changes in their environment for the purpose of improving the teaching—learning situation. Our work addresses the overarching question: What will happen when cogenerative dialogue praxis is introduced to an elementary school class? More specifically we explore; the use of cogenerative dialogues as research praxis in terms of some of the ethical issues inherent in classroom research; how cogenerative dialogue praxis can serve as one viable solution for teachers to ethically mediate the various activity systems that constitute a class; the internal contradictions inherent in cogenerative dialogues; the “unfocused” moments during cogenerative dialogues; the long term learning that takes place during the cogenerative dialogues; and finally we explore what we learned from the elementary teacher we worked with. The intended audiences for this book are professionals or acedemics that have used, or are curious about, cogenerative dialogues. Specifically, the unique application of cogenerative dialogues in an elementary school speaks to teachers at that level interested in increasing student participation.

Edited by Gillian Judson

This book offers a detailed examination of imagination in learning. Teachers working with the ideas of Imaginative Education in their classrooms provide examples that cover multiple curricular areas and span elementary through secondary school contexts. “Imagination” has moved in recent years from being considered some kind of educational frill to a recognized main workhorse of teaching and learning. It is this new perspective that this book celebrates and exemplifies. The book is divided between teachers’ and researchers’ voices, both exploring a range of ways in which the imagination can be used in everyday classrooms to enhance learning and increase the satisfactions of teaching. This book demonstrates how engaging the imagination lies at the core of effective education.