Teaching Scientific Inquiry

Recommendations for Research and Implementation

Edited by Richard A. Duschl and Richard E. Grandy

What are scientific inquiry practices like today? How should schools approach inquiry in science education? Teaching Science Inquiry presents the scholarly papers and practical conversations that emerged from the exchanges at a two-day conference of distinctive North American ‘science studies’ and ‘learning science’scholars. The conference goal: forge consensus views about images of inquiry that could inform teaching science through inquiry. The conference outcomes: recommendations for “Enhanced Scientific Method”, “Extended Immersion Units of Instruction”, and “Teacher Professional Development Models”. The edited volume will appeal to individuals interested in science learning as well as the design of learning environments. Scholars, policy makers, teacher educators and teachers will find this volume’s recommendations provocative and insightful. Twentieth century scientific advances with new tools, technologies, and theories have changed what it means to do science, to engage in scientific inquiry and to describe science as a way of knowing. Advances in ‘science studies’ disciplines are updating views about the nature of scientific inquiry. Advances in the cognitive and ‘learning sciences’ are altering understandings about knowledge acquisition, meaning making, and conditions for school learning. The conference papers, commentaries and panel reflections advance novel views about both children’s learning and the nature of science.

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Edited by Ray Land, Jan H.F. Meyer and Jan Smith

Threshold Concepts within the Disciplines brings together leading writers from various disciplines and national contexts in an important and readable volume for all those concerned with teaching and learning in higher education.
The foundational principle of threshold concepts is that there are, in each discipline, ‘conceptual gateways’ or ‘portals’ that must be negotiated to arrive at important new understandings. In crossing the portal, transformation occurs, both in knowledge and subjectivity. Such transformation involves troublesome knowledge, a key concern for contributors to this book, who identify threshold concepts in their own fields and suggest how to deal with them.
Part One extends and enhances the threshold concept framework, containing chapters that articulate its qualities, its links to other social theories of learning and other traditions in educational research.
Part Two encompasses the disciplinary heart of the book with contributions from a diversity of areas including computing, engineering, biology, design, modern languages, education and economics. In the many empirical case studies educators show how they have used the threshold concept framework to inform and evaluate their teaching contexts. Other chapters emphasise the equally important ‘being and becoming’ dimension of learning.
Part Three suggests pedagogic directions for those at the centre of the education project with contributions focusing on the socialisation of academics and their continuing quest to be effective teachers.
The book will be of interest to disciplinary teachers, educational researchers and educational developers. It also is of relevance to issues in quality assurance and professional accreditation.

Totems and Taboos

Risk and Relevance in Research on Teachers and Teaching

Edited by Jeanne Adèle Kentel and Andrew Short

Totems and Taboos: Risk and Relevance in Research on Teachers and Teaching, is a compilation of selected papers from the 2007 Biennial conference of the International Study Association on Teachers and Teaching (ISATT), held at Brock University. This volume contains keynote addresses and papers based on thematic presentations delivered at the conference; namely, critically investigative items which have been sacred to systems, institutions, and educational practitioners, in order to inform the theory and practice of teaching and research. While consideration of the native or aboriginal historical tradition of Canada was instrumental in developing a theme dealing with the nature of totems, it was recognized that such a heritage informs research and practice regardless of national borders. The papers included in this book reflect global perspectives on the conference theme and include thinkers from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, Israel, Slovenia, Turkey, and the United States. In addition the writings of seasoned academics and well published authors, the totems of the field so to speak are situated alongside papers from academic newcomers who have broken the taboo of not speaking in the presence of more experienced company.

The central metaphor of this book is the high wire or tightrope journey across Niagara Falls upon which we oscillate between the falsely dichotomous notions of research and teaching. The tension in leaning towards one side or the other is presented as a negotiated process of balancing research and teaching which maintains our progress forward in the field. Overlooking this edgy relationship will cause one to lean too much in one direction and fall into the chasm underneath. Thus the sections of this book are designed to examine educational progress across this high wire while maintaining awareness of the risks taken on this journey. Each paper is relevant to particular phases in this high wire walk and portrays the journeys of the authors within in order to inform the path of others.

Towards Quality Improvement of Action Research

Developing Ethics and Standards

Edited by Ben Boog, Meindert Slager, Julia Preece and Jacques Zeelen

This book offers perspectives and challenges for action research in contemporary society with a particular reflection on ethics and standards. On the one hand the world is becoming smaller and much more open with tremendous opportunities for international exchange and multi-cultural enrichment. On the other hand the divide between the poor and the rich is deepening, international tensions are growing and the sustainability of the environment is under considerable threat on a worldwide basis. These trends are challenging politicians, civil society and social movements to search for problem solving strategies to deal with the risks of exclusion, poverty, social and physical insecurity and environmental deprivation.
The intriguing question is what role action research could play in order to address these challenges? Action research has something to offer because it favours the connection between knowledge production and social change by means of partnerships between researchers, practitioners and a variety of client stakeholders. The focus is on providing the means to improve people’s self determination - to empower them in their roles as professional practitioners or citizens in the diverse social domains in which they live and work. Participatory action research and learning processes enable participants to improve the impact of services and programs in education, health care, urban and regional development, business, agriculture, arts, care of the elderly, leisure and many other spheres of social life.
The approach of action research, which is rooted among others in the work of John Dewey and Kurt Lewin, covers nowadays a landscape of different concepts such as participatory action research, cooperative inquiry and action learning, to mention just a few. In this book scholars from those divergent concepts of action research present and discuss instructive examples of action research practices from developed as well developing countries. Special attention is paid to the vital issue of how this type of research can be conducted in a participatory, responsible, transparent and scientific way.

Towards Scientific Literacy

A Teachers' Guide to the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science

Derek Hodson

This book is a guide for teachers, student teachers, teacher educators, science education researchers and curriculum developers who wish to get to grips with the vast and complex literature encompassing the history of science, philosophy of science and sociology of science (HPS). A number of books cover essentially the same ground, but what makes this book unique is that it is written from the perspective of science education. The author’s purpose is twofold. First, to identify, clarify and critique elements in the HPS literature that are of key importance in developing students’scientific and technological literacy, as defined in the opening chapter of the book. Second, to enhance teachers’ capacity to build and present curricula that afford a much higher profile to HPS than has been traditional. The significance of the book can be judged from the prominence given to nature of science understanding in much recent international debate and writing in science education and in the plethora of influential reports on science and technology education published around the world that identify HPS knowledge and understanding as central components of 21st century science education.

Transformative Teaching

Promoting Transformation Through Literature, the Arts, and Jungian Psychology

Darrell Dobson

This is a book that supports teachers, teacher educators and educational researchers as they strive for ways to make their work more authentic, more meaningful, and therefore more spiritual. Dobson describes the practices of exemplary teachers, offers a theoretical framework for transformative teaching, and includes useful examples that the reader can readily include in her own teaching and/or research. Dobson offers two innovative methods of teacher reflectivity (Interacting Narratives and Archetypal Reflectivity) and an original methodology of teaching literature and the arts that draws on the insights of depth psychology. Interwoven throughout the book is Dobson’s own story, that of an ‘at-risk’student who was deeply affected by his high school experiences with drama and literature.
The book will be of interest to teachers in all fields but particularly in literature and the arts. It will appeal to teacher educators, educational researchers, those interested in analytical psychology, those interested in narrative approaches to teacher education, and those interested in narrative approaches to educational research. It will be useful in courses that focus on the construction of teachers’ professional knowledge and reflective practices as well as methodology classes in literature, drama, and all the arts. The book will also be of interest in qualitative, arts-based research methodology classes.

Whose Learning is it?

Developing Children as active and responsible learners

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Jo Osler and Jill Flack

As this book by Jo Osler and Jill Flack makes clear, professional learning has a critical edge in terms of what it means not only for teachers’ practice but also for students’ learning. These two highly skilled teacher researchers illustrate what is possible when professionals choose to develop and extend their own knowledge in ways that are driven by their concern for the development of their own professional practice in innovative and creative ways.
As one reads through the chapters that comprise the remarkable journey that Jo and Jill have had together and have consolidated through writing this book, it becomes immediately obvious that their knowledge, skills and ability combine in ways that lead to meaningful new insights into teaching and learning. Their work is challenging, thought provoking and ground breaking in the way that it both speaks to the world of teaching and learning and creates a vision for the development of teachers and teaching more generally.

Rethinking Education with ICT

New Directions for Effective Practices

Edited by Nicola Yelland, Greg A. Neal and Eva Dakich

This book brings together a number of academics who have conducted research and written about effective practices and pedagogies that incorporate the use of information and communications technologies (ICT). The book is intended for graduate and undergraduate students in Teacher Education programmes, as well as teachers and those who are interested in contemporary educational issues. The authors in this book have been engaged in rethinking education with ICT. Implicit in this, is the view that we need to reconceptualise our pedagogies and practices in order to make schools relevant to the lives of the young people who inhabit them. The chapters in this book are based on empirically grounded research work. The chapters illustrate the various dimensions of innovative practices with ICT that can extend teachers’ pedagogies and engage learners so that they are able to extend their potential for knowledge building in new and dynamic ways.

Texte lesen

Textverstehen - Lesedidaktik - Lesesozialisation

Karl Holle, Christine Garbe, Tatjana Jesch and Jörg Steitz-Kallenbach

Edited by Christine Garbe