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Disaster Diplomacy and Its Foreign Policy Implications
Catastrophe and Conflict: Disaster Diplomacy and Its Foreign Policy Implications examines how and why disaster-related activities (disaster response and disaster risk reduction) do and do not lead to diplomatic endeavours. With respect to foreign policy implications, the main question examined here is: Under what circumstances could disaster diplomacy be actively made to succeed or not to succeed? Previous case studies are summarised followed by new case studies of disease diplomacy and climate change diplomacy. From the case studies, disaster diplomacy could succeed when those in power decide that they want it to succeed and then use their power for that goal. This situation is not likely to arise because of only disaster-related activities. Instead, pre-existing interests supporting diplomacy are needed.
A New Legal Instrument for EU Integration Without Membership
In The EU-Ukraine Association Agreement and Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area, Guillaume Van der Loo provides the first comprehensive legal analysis of this complex and controversial international agreement. While key political and legal hurdles towards the signing and conclusion of this agreement are analysed, its scope and contents are scrutinised and contrasted to other international agreements concluded by the EU. Specific attention is devoted to the ambitious “deep and comprehensive free trade area” and the unique provisions related to Ukraine’s approximation to the EU acquis. In particular, this book explores to what extent the agreement can be considered a new legal instrument for ‘EU integration without membership’.
Brill Research Perspectives in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy provides an open forum for reference publication, critical analysis, and cutting-edge research on contemporary issues of diplomacy and foreign policy. By emphasizing theory-practice integration, multidisciplinarity, and accessibility of content, the journal positions itself at the center of conceptual debates that frame the theory, practice, and transformation of 21st-century diplomatic relations. Published in four issues per year, the journal promotes creative, problem-solving approaches for the management of peaceful change in transnational affairs as a contribution to global governance.

Each issue includes a focused monograph of between approximately 30,000-40,000 words (70-100 pages) presenting the state of the art in a specific diplomatic area in close combination with critical analysis, research, and policy implications.

Brill Research Perspectives in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy’s primary readership includes diplomatic scholars, international relations analysts, graduate and undergraduate students of international affairs, foreign policy decision makers, international NGOs, practitioners, and educators in diplomatic academies.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.

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A Book Based on the Report “Strategic Assessment of Development of the Arctic: Assessment Conducted for the European Union”
The Changing Arctic and the European Union provides a balanced and up-to-date overview of the multidimensional change taking place in the Arctic regions. Against this background, the role of the European Union regarding Arctic developments is considered, including the ongoing process of formulating an umbrella EU Arctic policy. In particular, the themes of climate change, maritime transport, fisheries, offshore oil and gas extraction, mining, land use and sociocultural change are discussed. The book comprises primarily an updated and expanded version of the report Strategic Assessment of Development of the Arctic: An assessment conducted for the European Union, produced for the European Commission. The report was to a great extent based on the interaction with Arctic stakeholders.
Editors: Maria Elo and Liesl Riddle
Diaspora Business is a unique book taking an overarching view to diaspora and business on a global scale. It examines diaspora in the global economy and marketplace from interdisciplinary perspectives. Moreover, it provides numerous discussions on concepts, roles, activities, organizational forms and institutional dimensions combined with empirical research. The scope of the book includes developed, emerging and developing country contexts and matches those to strategic perspectives on management, utilization and employment of diasporas and their resources. The authors represent diverse nationalities and ethnicities, and thus enrich the book with their particular viewpoints. The book is structured in four parts; the first one concentrates on diaspora business, investment and trade, the second one on diaspora entrepreneurship and internationalization, the third one on diaspora networks, roles and social capital, and the fourth part focuses on diaspora frameworks, institutions and policy making.
Strengthening the United Nations's Pre-Conflict Prevention Role
Examining the shortcomings of eliciting sustainable intra-state peace through the UN system and the underlying positive peace paradigm of the liberal traditions, the book maintains that a novel positive peace vision and framework under the auspices of the UN is warranted. Building upon grievance-based explanations of violent conflicts and conflict transformation research, this book develops a comprehensive positive peace framework that involves the early tackling of identity divisions (i.e. Fundamental Conflicts) through UN facilitated deliberative and dialogical processes at the 1.5 track diplomacy level. This framework is designed to complement current UN post-conflict peacebuilding and structural prevention practice. By dealing both with how to operationalise early conflict prevention in a workable manner and developing a comprehensive yet viable positive peace approach, this book entails an extensive interdisciplinary approach and new in-depth analyses of the wide-ranging normative and policy aspects of the quest of elevating positive peace to a core objective of UN practice.
Diplomacy is no longer restricted to a single vocation nor implemented exclusively through interaction amongst official representatives. In exploring the challenges that these transformations produce, this work surveys firstly, the genealogy of diplomacy as a profession, tracing how it changed from a civic duty into a vocation requiring training and the acquisition of specific knowledge and skills. Secondly, using the lens of the sociology of professions, the development of diplomacy as a distinctive profession is examined, including its importance for the consolidation of the power of modern nation-states. Thirdly, it examines how the landscape of professional diplomacy is being diversified and, we argue, enriched by a series of non-state actors, with their corresponding professionals, transforming the phenomenology of contemporary diplomacy. Rather than seeing this pluralization of diplomatic actors in negative terms as the deprofessionalization of diplomacy, we frame these trends as transprofessionalization, that is, as a productive development that reflects the expanded diplomatic space and the intensified pace of global interconnections and networks, and the new possibilities they unleash for practising diplomacy in different milieus.
Across the world, ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities are subjected to hate crimes, systematic discrimination and marginalization. Religious minorities have recently faced particular threat in certain regions, while in other parts of the globe identity based on race or ethnicity has been used as a basis for exclusion.

In The First United Nations Mandate on Minority Issues, Gay McDougall curates a selection of reports she produced as UN Independent Expert on Minority Issues. The collection, with her introductory analysis, reveals the challenges and opportunities faced in her attempt to highlight the plight of these oppressed communities around the world and to shape an important new mechanism for the UN’s protection of their rights.
Editor: Ying-jeou Ma
The Chinese (Taiwan) Yearbook of International Law and Affairs includes articles and international law materials relating to the Asia-Pacific and the Republic of China on Taiwan. This volume discusses issues on Cross-Straits relations, Hong Kong, South China Sea disputes, and Japanese cases relating to war compensation. It provides a detailed account of the 2013 Guang Da Xing No. 28 incident and Taiwan’s participation in the International Civil Aviation Organization and free trade agreements with New Zealand and Singapore.
Representing the Periphery
Histories of Public Diplomacy and Nation Branding in the Nordic and Baltic Countries provides an historical perspective on public diplomacy and nation branding in the Nordic and Baltic countries from 1900 to the present day. It highlights continuity and change in the efforts to strategically represent these nations abroad, and shows how a self-understanding of being peripheral has led to similarities in the deployed practices throughout the Nordic-Baltic region.

Edited by Louis Clerc, Nikolas Glover and Paul Jordan, the volume examines a range of actors that have attempted to influence foreign opinions and strengthen their country’s political and commercial position. Variously labelled propaganda, information, diplomacy and branding, these constant efforts to enhance the national image abroad have affected how the nation has been imagined in the domestic context.