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Contemporary art must get inspiration from somewhere. In Tea, Automatons, and Time Machines, the subculture of Steampunk art is studied in relation to art history. Addressing three main topics within social and environmental justice, a comparison of art styles and creativity stems from an artist’s passion within popular culture.

Using arts-based research methods and personal introspection viewed through the lens of nostalgia, a unique perspective of art history studies comes to life. Nostalgia, being primarily a psychological study, is used as a lens to view art, culture, and memoir into a complete research project.

We live in a world in need of change. Historically, artists have provided a means for change through their work and the lives they choose to live. The vastness of art history provides plenty of room for inspiration and interpretation. In this study, the contemporary sub-culture of Steampunk looks nostalgically at Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco eras in a way that paves the way for social change and environmental preservation using fantasy, cos-play, and art to demonstrate needed changes. Through the art and culture of Steampunk, we explore areas that could use improvement in our modern world, and yet, they do tie in with similar occurrences of the past. We find that we’re not that different but with art and demonstration, we too, can make positive changes for our future.
Volume Editor:
Pedagogies of magic have their own cocooned metaphors waiting to hatch. In literature and the arts, magic ties its practitioners to systems of learning and methods of becoming. Enchanted Pedagogies, edited by Kari Adelaide Razdow, is a collection of essays by artists and writers who reflect on archetypes and tropes of enchantment, intertwining elements such as transformation, imagination, creativity, and empathy. These essays evoke shapeshifters, witches, ghosts, fools, fairies, hags, gnomes, selkies, and more, exploring multi-disciplinary artistic practices. Enchanted Pedagogies presents ways to expand, imagine, and circumvent modes of creativity and pedagogies through personal, theoretical, practice based, and hybrid explorations. The fantastic and poetic intertwine in a space of reflexive storytelling, renewing significant transformational elements of the arts and education. Contributors are: Jesse Bransford, Vanessa Chakour, Trinie Dalton, Lorenzo De Los Angeles, Thom Donovan, Laura Forsberg, Pam Grossman, Amy Hale, Elizabeth Insogna, Candice Ivy, Tiffany Jewell, Alessandro Keegan, Jac Lahav, Ruth Lingford, Maria Pinto, Kris N. Racaniello, Kari Adelaide Razdow, Alicia Smith, Janaka Stucky, Kay Turner, Meg Whiteford and Erin Yerby.
Volume Editor:
Arts Education: A Global Affair highlights the adaptations that arts educators and researchers have undertaken to successfully adjust to the changes in arts education practices as a consequence of the global pandemic and its ongoing variants. Moreover, teaching and research in arts education have changed significantly as a consequence of the world-wide pandemic, COVID-19. Emerging variants have exacerbated the situation and show no signs of subsiding. In response to these challenges, arts educators and researchers have developed new modes of instructional delivery and data collection. These include asynchronous, synchronous, hybrid and bi-modal online learning, and online questionnaires, surveys, focus groups, and video interviews. This volume highlights the adaptations that arts educators and researchers have undertaken to successfully adjust to this new reality in education.
Volume Editors: and
Theories and Practices of Integral Education and Integral Drama Based Pedagogy presents studies exploring the deep connections among theories and practices of integral education; and it introduces Integral Drama Based Pedagogy, a new integration of educational, therapeutic, artistic, and social theories and practices.
An international group of scholars, teachers, professors, and practitioners have contributed studies that draw upon theories of integral education from various times and cultures as well as practices that exemplify and encourage fresh integrations. The essays are especially relevant because of the current global evolution of education at all levels, from primary school to the university and into the community. This evolution has been inspiring teachers and professors to move beyond their traditional disciplinary boundaries, to engage in transdisciplinary educational models that embody multiple ways of knowing, and to recognize the student as a whole person.
Integral Education is not limited to a particular theory or practice: it is expansive. It integrates many models of teaching and learning, for example, Integral Drama Based Pedagogy integrates drama and other expressive arts. It also includes multiple ways of knowing; it embodies teaching and learning through action; and it values the intellectual, physical, and spiritual dimensions of being human.
What do you do that can’t be measured? In this innovative debut on both the practice and study of critical educators, Restler answers back with radical care. Radical care in teaching and research; radical care as embodied and affective; radical care as justice work up against real and imagined deficits and racial capitalist scarcities. Drawing on a collaborative visual study with New York City public school teachers and her own art-research practice, Victoria Restler offers up a framework for radical care as relational, liberatory and fundamentally immeasurable.

Slipping between genres and styles—personal narrative, poetic prose, empirical study, and three multimodal artworks—this book brings old and new traditions in arts-based research into dialogue with scholarship on care, affect studies, and Black Feminisms. The volume is essential reading for scholars and practitioners interested in the study of care, qualitative and arts-based research methodologies, as well as teacher practice and assessment.
Author:
We live in a world where conversations about trauma are becoming commonplace and adopted people are using their voices to educate the general public about the effects of maternal separation and genealogical bewilderment. But for many adult adoptees the act of speaking truth to power is still fraught. Personal writing can unlock long held silences and help adult adoptees feel empowered to rewrite their narratives.

The need to deconstruct dominant narratives about adoption and its inherent loss and trauma is necessary if we are to reform an institution that has damaged many generations of mothers and children. Because many adoptees do not have access to adoption and trauma competent therapists, writing is an accessible therapeutic modality that can be used to reframe narratives that position adoptees as the object rather than the subject. 

Adult Adoptees and Writing to Heal shares the framework and method of using writing as a practice for adult adoptees, therapists, teachers, and researchers interested in learning how to migrate and heal embodied trauma. It analyzes lived experience and the author’s own writing to develop a methodology for moving toward wholeness by writing and speaking the truth of internal adoptee experiences.
Prompting this book is the paradox of belonging. What pushes the author to write are art’s questions. Rather than take the route of writing, artists in academia could opt for the studio, teaching students, and occasionally indulge in conferences and symposia. However, beyond such rituals, writing art’s questions remains akin to art’s acts of belonging. In these lessons of belonging this is done through art’s paradox. Belonging is a matter of art because art belongs to the aporia that writes it.
Author:
Lonnin, an English dialect word, means a shared and borrowed, unofficial, track. The Lonnin Project is deliberately genre fluid, designed to resist classification by algorithm – an illustrated verse-novel and account of a creative process in which images, objects and texts are mutually affective. A quest for belonging, and the fickleness of recall in a fragile world, affect key characters in the narrative and the hybrid Project, which, in its entirety, explores creative outputs as a reciprocal refinement between image and text, reversing the habit of thought that prioritizes creative writing over art production. Here text is provisional until the visual illustrations are settled. This creative strategy has been relatively unexplored and so provides a useful guide for practice-based researchers, particularly those interested in Performance Writing.

Unusually, the text initially precedes and provokes 3D artworks which claim to belong to characters in the novel. These objects are slowly hand-built from sustainable, repurposed materials to become the antithesis of ‘merchandise’, occupying a mythical realm between the invented world of the story and material reality, where lonnin claims history resides. The objects are then re-expressed as 2D illustrations, refined to become cyanotypes, which subsequently modify the writing that originally inspired them.