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Early Modern Global Travelers beyond Integration
Early Modern travelers often did not form part of classic ‘diaspora’ communities: they frequently never really settled, perhaps remaining abroad for some time in one place, then traveling further: not ‘blown by the wind’, but by changing and complex conditions that often turned out to make them unwelcome anywhere. The dispersed developed strategies of survival by keeping their distance from old and new temporary ‘homes’, and by manipulating, shaping, using information and foreign representations of their former country and situation.

The volume assembles case studies from the Mediterranean context, the Americas and Japan. They ask for what kind of ‘power(s)’ and agency dispersed people had, counterintuitively, through the connections they maintained with their former homes, and through those they established abroad.

Contributors include: Eduardo Angione, Iordan Avramov, Marloes Cornelissen, David Do Paço, José Luis Egío, Maria-Tsampika Lampitsi, Paula Manstetten, Simon Mills, David Nelson, Adolfo Polo y La Borda, Ana M. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Cesare Santus, Stefano Saracino, and Cornel Zwierlein.
Winner of the 2015 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award
Also available in paperback. The work is also included in the Chinese-English Dictionary Online.

A Student’s Dictionary of Classical and Medieval Chinese is the long-desired Chinese – English reference work for all those reading texts dating from the Warring States period through the Tang dynasty. Comprising 8,000+ characters, arranged alphabetically by Pinyin.
As a lexicon meant for practical use, it immensely facilitates reading and translating historical, literary, and religious texts dating from approximately 500 BCE to 1000 CE. Being primarily a dictionary of individual characters ( zidian 字典) and the words they represent, it also includes an abundance of alliterative and echoic binomes ( lianmianci 連綿詞) as well as accurate identifications of hundreds of plants, animals, and assorted technical terms in various fields. It aims to become the English-language resource of choice for all those seeking assistance in reading texts dating from the Warring States period through the Tang dynasty.
Previous Chinese-English dictionaries have persistently mixed together without clarification all eras and styles of Chinese. But written Chinese in its 3,000 year history has changed and evolved even more than English has in its mere millennium, with classical and medieval Chinese differing more from modern standard Chinese than the language of Beowulf or even that of Chaucer differs from modern English. This dictionary takes the user straight into the language of early and medieval texts, without the confusion of including meanings that developed only after 1000 CE. An added feature of the dictionary is its identification of meanings that were not developed and attached to individual graphs until the medieval period (approximately 250-1000 CE), setting these off where possible from earlier usages of the same graphs.
Those who have, or are acquiring, a basic understanding of classical grammar, whether approaching the language from a background either in modern Chinese or Japanese, will find it eases their labors appreciably and helps to solve countless problems of interpretation. Advanced students will find it to be the one reference work they want always close at hand.
The dictionary has an index by “radical” and stroke-number, and contains various appendices, including one with reign-eras and exact accession dates of emperors given according to both Chinese and Western calendars.

Corrections have been provided by William Baxter for some of the Middle Chinese (MC) readings in this revised edition of the dictionary. These are also reflected in the online version of the dictionary, available through chinesereferenceshelf.brillonline.com/chinese-english. They are also available in a downloadable file on this page under More Information for those who have purchased the first edition of this work.
Part I: The Pre-Islamic Period
Editor: Valerie Hansen
This is the first of two collections by top scholars working on the history of the Silk Road. This collection’s main focus is the first millennium CE when the Silk Road trade was at its height. Most of the entries are organized chronologically and geographically, concentrating on the sites (like Niya and Loulan) which flourished in the third and fourth centuries, then Turfan and Samarkand (500-800), and closes with the period after 800, when Tang China withdrew its troops from the region and the local peoples reverted to a largely barter economy. Coverage ends in 1000, when the first cities on the western edge of the Taklamakan converted to Islam. Introductory texts provide general overviews of the trade (including classic pre- and post-war studies), followed by a brief survey of the ancient trade routes. Of particular interest in this collection are the Silk Road’s most famous group of travellers, the Sogdians, a people from the region of Samarkand (in today's Uzbekistan) thanks to Chinese archaeologists who have recently uncovered several tombs that allow us to see how the Sogdians gradually adjusted to Chinese culture, decorating their tombs with detailed scenes of everyday life.
Translator: Naomi Norberg
This landmark volume deals with such essential questions as: What points of departure, or resources, can be identified in Chinese history and culture for what we call 'democracy'? What are, and have been, their potential for development in a modern China confronted with powerful Western influences? Are there any connections between imperial China’s strong legal tradition and the PRC’s current endeavour to restore the rule of law, in a context of legal globalization in which China itself is an important participant? How serious, or superficial, should the political opening which started in the 1980s be regarded, and the discourse on human rights currently heard in official circles? And finally, how relevant is Taiwan’s experiment with democratic institutions?
In this rich and inspiring volume, foremost French scholars carefully clarify the process of political and legal change, convincingly showing that these questions cannot be answered without a proper understanding of centuries of Chinese juridical, philosophical, religious and political thought.
Ouvrage publié avec le soutien du Centre national du livre/ Published with financial support by the Centre national du livre.
This political biography reveals the turbulent life of Ernest François Eugène Douwes Dekker, son of a Dutch father and a German-Javanese mother, born on Java in 1879. Vignettes flow in novel-like fashion from the battle fields of South Africa and internment camp in Sri Lanka to a career in journalism in Java. Radical thoughts then enter Douwes Dekker’s mind, such as demands for racial equality and national independence. These made him write presciently that this road might take him to the executioner's hand or to the victory of revolution. In exile from 1913 on, his bravado allowed him to enter a doctoral program at the University of Zurich but also to entanglement with Indian revolutionaries operating from Berlin. Returning to Java at the end of World War I, he once again propagated the virtues of nationalism, but soon was forced to relinquish his efforts and start a teaching career. Even here constant surveillance and eventual internment in Surinam were his lot.
Within a decade, the Republic of Indonesia had been proclaimed and Douwes Dekker emerged to acclaim as a close friend and political adviser to President Soekarno.
Editor: Wilhelm Röhl
This handbook volume traces the development of Japan’s feudal legal system into that of a modern type of a state, covering the period from the beginning of modernization in1886 to the end of the Pacific War, and, beyond that, the period of reorientation (1945-1950) and thereafter.
Each author follows closely the development of a main branch of the legal system, describing the path of a legal institution progressing through a semi-feudalistic period, the introduction of western views, as well as the coexistence and mixture of essentially Japanese and European or American notions at the same time.
A careful analysis of Japan’s dealings with its legal system through a time of unprecedented change, and therefore a must for historians and jurists alike.
The Feminist Movement in Singapore
Author: Lenore Lyons
This book examines the contemporary feminist movement in Singapore through an in-depth case study of the locally-based Association of Women for Action and Research (AWARE). It examines the meanings attached to feminist activism by AWARE members, including the use of the label 'feminist' as a self-identifier by both individuals as well as the organisation as a whole. By exploring the range of activities that AWARE has been involved in since the mid-1980s, the text describes in detail the fraught relationship between feminism and the state in Singapore. The author uses the framework of transnational feminism to explore the ways in which gender, race/ethnicity, and class intersect in the construction of historically and culturally specific feminisms. The book will be of interest to scholars from a range of disciplines, including those working on gender studies, feminist history, and Southeast Asian studies.
Networks of Malay-Indonesian and Middle Eastern 'Ulamā' in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
Author: A. Azra
Author: Traude Gavin
Author: Ellen Raven
Volume two, containing circa 2000 records selected from the annotated bibliographic database on South and Southeast Asian art and archaeology (formerly Annual Bibliography of Indian Archaeology) found at www.abia.net. Compiled by an international team of specialists brought together in a project of The International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS) in Leiden. Features all forms of scholarly publications, ranging from survey works to small but important articles in monographs and journals, published world wide between 1997 and 2001.
Subjects include pre- and protohistory, historical archaeology, ancient art history, modern art history, material culture, epigraphy and palaeography, numismatics and sigillography (seals). Covered are South Asia and its culturally related regions (Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Tibet) and Southeast Asia (including related regions in South China and the Pacific). The detailed bibliographic descriptions (which faithfully reproduce the original diacritics), controlled keywords and many elucidating annotations make this reference work into an indispensable guide to recent scholarly work on the prehistory and arts of South/Southeast Asia.