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Proceedings of an Eighth Symposium on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ben Sira
Volume Editor: Steven Fassberg
The 21 essays in this volume deal with the language and text of Hebrew corpora from the Second Temple period. They were originally presented at the Eighth International Symposium on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ben Sira, held in January 2016 in Jerusalem.
Most of the papers focus on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the light of First and Second Temple Hebrew. A few of the contributions are devoted primarily to the language of Ben Sira, Samaritan Hebrew, and Mishnaic Hebrew. You will find discussions of orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, language contact, and sociolinguistics.
Author: Changyu Liu
In The Ur III Administrative Texts from Puzrish-Dagan Kept in the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East Changyu Liu offers an edition of a collection of 689 cuneiform clay tablets kept in the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East (HMANE, formerly Harvard Semitic Museum), Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. These administrative documents date to the Third Dynasty of Ur (Ur III, ca. 2112–2004 BCE) of Mesopotamian history and are from Puzrish-Dagan (modern Drehem in southern Iraq).

The editions of the 689 Ur III texts, arranged by their catalogue numbers, are significant for further study of how the Puzrish-Dagan organization functioned. New evidence has been gleaned and new conclusions can be drawn from texts in this book.

The Harvard Semitic Studies series publishes volumes from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://hmane.harvard.edu/publications.
Author: Fredrik Hagen
In Ostraca from the Temple of Millions of Years of Thutmose III, Fredrik Hagen publishes a range of texts from recent excavations at Thebes. Although fragmentary, it is one of the richest corpora that have come to light for a generation, in terms of both the number of ostraca and the different types of texts represented, and provides essential new data for anyone interested in ancient Egyptian temples, religion, priests, and social history.

The texts shed light on many aspects of life in an Egyptian temple, including the building of the temple, the daily operations of its cult, the organisation and size of the priesthood, types and quantities of offerings, as well as the broader cultural issues of literacy and the transmission of literature.
Traces of Ink
Open Access
Experiences of Philology and Replication
Volume Editor: Lucia Raggetti
Traces of Ink. Experiences of Philology and Replication is a collection of original papers exploring the textual and material aspects of inks and ink-making in a number of premodern cultures (Babylonia, the Graeco-Roman world, the Syriac milieu and the Arabo-Islamic tradition). The volume proposes a fresh and interdisciplinary approach to the study of technical traditions, in which new results can be achieved thanks to the close collaboration between philologists and scientists. Replication represents a crucial meeting point between these two parties: a properly edited text informs the experts in the laboratory who, in turn, may shed light on many aspects of the text by recreating the material reality behind it.

Contributors are: Miriam Blanco Cesteros, Michele Cammarosano, Claudia Colini, Vincenzo Damiani, Sara Fani, Matteo Martelli, Ira Rabin, Lucia Raggetti, and Katja Weirauch.
Editor: Juan-Pablo Vita
Akkadian is, after Sumerian, the second oldest language attested in the Ancient Near East, as well as the oldest known Semitic language. It is also a language with one of history’s longest written records. And yet, unlike other relevant languages written over a long period of time, there has been no volume dedicated to its own history. The aim of the present work is to fill that void. The outcome is presented in 26 chapters written by 25 leading authors and divided into two volumes, the first covering the linguistic background and early periods and the second covering the second and first millennia BCE as well as its afterlife.
Some people love their friends even when they are far away: Festschrift in Honour of Francisca A.J. Hoogendijk
This volume is a Festschrift in honour of Francisca Hoogendijk, containing contributions by forty friends, colleagues and former students. It includes fifty-six editions and re-editions of (Abnormal) Hieratic, Demotic, Greek, Latin and Coptic texts, most of them from Ancient Egypt. The texts are as diverse as the jubilee’s own range of interests and her extensive papyrological network, including both literary and documentary texts, written on papyri and potsherds, dating from the twelfth century BCE to the eighth century CE. All texts are published with transcriptions, translations, commentary and photographs.
Aramaic, South Arabian, Coptic, Arabic and Judeo-Arabic Documents
Volume Editors: Andreas Kaplony and Daniel Potthast
The renaissance of Arabic Papyrology has become obvious by the founding of the International Society for Arabic Papyrology (ISAP) at the Cairo conference (2002), and by its subsequent conferences in Granada (2004), Alexandria (2006), Vienna (2009), Tunis/Carthage (2012), Munich (2014), and Berlin (2018). This volume collects papers given at the Munich conference, including editions of previously unpublished Coptic, Arabic and Judeo-Arabic documents, as well as historical studies based on documentary evidence from Achaemenid Bactria, Ancient South-Arabia, and Early Islamic, Fāṭimid and Mamlūk Egypt.

Contributors: Anne Boud'hors; Ursula Bsees; Peter T. Daniels; Maher A. Eissa; Andreas Kaplony; W. Matt Malczycki; Craig Perry; Daniel Potthast; Peter Stein; Naïm Vanthieghem; Oded Zinger 
In Israel in Egypt scholars in different fields explore what can be known of the experiences of the many and varied Jewish communities in Egypt, from biblical sources to the medieval world. For generations of Jews from antiquity to the medieval period, the land of Egypt represented both a place of danger to their communal religious identity and also a haven with opportunities for prosperity and growth. A volume of collected essays from scholars in fields ranging from biblical studies and classics to papyrology and archaeology, Israel in Egypt explores what can be known of the experiences of the many and varied Jewish communities in Egypt, from biblical sources to the medieval world.
In History of the Pauline Corpus in Texts, Transmissions, and Trajectories , Chris S. Stevens examines the Greek manuscripts of the Pauline texts from P46 to Claromontanus. Previous research is often hindered by the lack of a systematic analysis and an indelicate linguistic methodology. This book offers an entirely new analysis of the early life of the Pauline corpus. Departing from traditional approaches, this text-critical work is the first to use Systemic Functional Linguistics, which enables both the comparison and ranking of textual differences across multiple manuscripts. Furthermore, the analysis is synchronically oriented, so it is non-evaluative. The results indicate a highly uniform textual transmission during the early centuries. The systematic analysis challenges previous research regarding text types, Christological scribal alterations, and textual trajectories.
Author: Fei Chen
In Study on the Synchronistic King List from Ashur, CHEN Fei conducts a full investigation into that king list, which records all the kings of Assyria and Babylonia in contemporary pairs from the 18th to the 7th century BC. The texts of all the exemplars of the Synchronistic King List are reconstructed anew by the existing studies and the author’s personal collations on their sources, and part of the text of the main exemplar is thus revised. The author also looks into the format of the Synchronistic King List and draws the conclusion that the Synchronistic King List was composed by Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria, to support his Babylonian policy.