Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 230 items for :

  • Archaeology, Art & Architecture x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
One group of ancient Egyptian drawings has captured the curiosity of scholars and laypeople alike: images of animals acting like people. They illustrate animal fables originally from a larger mythological narrative, making them an integral part of New Kingdom Thebes’s religious environment. This book examines the purpose of animal fables, drawing cross cultural and temporal comparisons to other storytelling and artistic traditions.

This publication is also the first thorough art historical treatment of the ostraca and papyri. The drawings’ iconography and aesthetic value are carefully examined, providing further nuance to our understanding of ancient Egyptian art.
The corpus of Aramaic magic bowls from Sasanian Mesopotamia is perhaps the most important source we have for studying the everyday beliefs and practices of the Jewish, Christian, Mandaean, Manichaean, Zoroastrian and Pagan communities on the eve of the Islamic conquests. The bowls published in this volume are from the Schøyen Collection, which has over 650 texts in Jewish Babylonian Aramaic, Mandaic and Syriac, and forms the largest collection of its kind in the world. This volume presents editions of fifty-five Jewish Babylonian Aramaic texts, with accompanying introductions, translations, philological notes, photographs and indices. The themes covered are magical seals and signet-rings. It is the second in a multi-volume project that aims to publish the Schøyen Collection of magic bowls.
The South-Eastern Samaria Shoulder, from Wadi Rashash to Wadi 'Aujah
Authors: Shay Bar and Adam Zertal Z"l
The book presents the results of a complete detailed survey of the eastern region of Samaria, mainly the South-Eastern Samaria Shoulder, from Wadi Rashash to Wadi 'Aujah within the territory of Israel/Palestine. This project, in progress since 1978, and covering 2500 sq. km, is a thorough, metre-by-metre mapping of the archaeological-historical area between the River Jordan and the Sharon Plain, and between Nahal 'Iron and the north-eastern point of the Dead Sea. This territory is one of the most important in the country from the Biblical and archaeological view; and the survey is a valuable tool for scholars of the Bible, Archaeology, Near Eastern history, tourism, and other aspects of the Holy Land.
Sources of Warfare Leadership in Ancient Egypt. Ancient Warfare Series Volume 4
The study of the ancient Egyptian military and warfare now encompasses the background court society in which the various eulogies drawn up for the glorification of the kings were composed. This study proceeds from a previous analysis of the leadership characteristics of the military pharaohs to their underlying war records to the literary compositions that the pharaohs had drawn up for their glorification. A study of these court-inspired accounts fits within the overarching new perspectives of royally directed and inspired ancient Egyptian literature. The historical background covers the New Kingdom pharaohs Kamose, Thutmose III, Ramesses II and III, with Merenptah, plus Pianchy. The concentration is primarily upon the narrative structures employed in each of these king’s monumental inscriptions.
Author: Louise Quillien
Textiles were one of the most celebrated products of Near-Eastern craft in Antiquity. In Histoire des Textiles en Babylonie, 626–484 av. J.-C., Louise Quillien offers an analysis of textile manufacturing, exchanges and uses in Babylonian society. In a context where archaeological textile remains are rare, cuneiform texts provide rich information on this craft. The book demonstrates that through the study of objects, it is possible to highlight a whole section of the economy, culture, religion and social customs of an ancient society, and proposes to immerse the reader in the daily life of the inhabitants of Mesopotamia.
This interdisciplinary volume is a ‘one-stop location’ for the most up-to-date scholarship on Southern Levantine figurines in the Iron Age. The essays address terracotta figurines attested in the Southern Levant from the Iron Age through the Persian Period (1200–333 BCE). The volume deals with the iconography, typology, and find context of female, male, animal, and furniture figurines and discusses their production, appearance, and provenance, including their identification and religious functions. While giving priority to figurines originating from Phoenicia, Philistia, Jordan, and Israel/Palestine, the volume explores the influences of Egyptian, Anatolian, Mesopotamian, and Mediterranean (particularly Cypriot) iconography on Levantine pictorial material.
This book concerns the ancient rock-cut monuments carved throughout the Near East, paying particular attention to the fate of these monuments in the centuries after their initial production. As parts of the landscapes in which they were carved, they acquired new meanings in the cultural memory of the people living around them. The volume joins numerous recent studies on the reception of historical texts and artefacts, exploring the peculiar affordances of these long-lasting and often salient monuments. The volume gathers articles by archeologists, art historians, and philologists, covering the entire Near East, from Iran to Lebanon and from Turkey to Egypt. It also analyzes long-lasting textual traditions that aim to explain the origins and meaning of rock-cut monuments and other related carvings.
Volume 2: The Stratigraphy, Ceramics, and Other Finds
Horvat Omrit is a Roman period sanctuary complex in northern Israel with well-preserved temple architecture. This report presents artifacts recovered in the temenos excavations from 1999 to 2011. The volume begins with a discussion of the excavated stratigraphy, the major building phases, and the dates associated with them. Subsequent chapters examine Hellenistic and Roman ceramics, lamps, terracotta figurines, wall paintings and frescoes, coins from the Roman and medieval periods, a dedicatory pavement inscription, a 3rd-century BCE Aramaic inscription, faunal remains, jewellery, an 8th-century BCE cylinder seal, a marble sphinx, a stucco relief, and a small, inscribed altar. An appendix associates the catalogued artifacts with their stratigraphic locations. Altogether the artifacts contribute to the archaeology and history of a diverse Galilee.
Author: Giorgia Cafici
In The Egyptian Elite as Roman Citizens Giorgia Cafici offers the analysis of private, male portrait sculptures as attested in Egypt between the end of the Ptolemaic and the beginning of the Roman Period.

Ptolemaic/Early Roman portraits are examined using a combination of detailed stylistic evaluation, philological analysis of the inscriptions and historical and prosopographical investigation of the individuals portrayed. The emergence of this type of sculpture has been contextualised, both geographically and chronologically, as it belongs to a wider Mediterranean horizon.

The analysis has revealed that eminent members of the Egyptian elite decided to be represented in an innovative way, echoing the portraits of eminent Romans of the Late Republic, whose identity was surely known in Egypt.
In his new monograph Early Arsakid Parthia (ca. 250-165 B.C.): At the Crossroads of Iranian, Hellenistic, and Central Asian History, Marek Jan Olbrycht explores the early history of the Arsakid Parthian state. Making use of literary and epigraphic evidence as well numismatic and archaeological sources, Olbrycht convincingly depicts how the Arsakid dynasty created a kingdom (248 B.C.-A.D. 226), small at first, which, within a century after its founding, came to dominate the Iranian Plateau and portions of Central Asia as well as Mesopotamia. The “Parthian genius” lay in the Arsakids’ ability to have blended their steppe legacy with that of sedentary Iranians, and to have absorbed post-Achaemenid Iranian and Seleukid socio-economic, political, and cultural traditions.