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One group of ancient Egyptian drawings has captured the curiosity of scholars and laypeople alike: images of animals acting like people. They illustrate animal fables originally from a larger mythological narrative, making them an integral part of New Kingdom Thebes’s religious environment. This book examines the purpose of animal fables, drawing cross cultural and temporal comparisons to other storytelling and artistic traditions.

This publication is also the first thorough art historical treatment of the ostraca and papyri. The drawings’ iconography and aesthetic value are carefully examined, providing further nuance to our understanding of ancient Egyptian art.
A Network Analytical Approach to a Bilingual Community
Author: Lena Tambs
This study tackles pertinent questions about daily life and socio-economic interactions in the late Ptolemaic town of Pathyris (186-88 BCE) through an empirically grounded network analysis of 428 Greek and Demotic documents associated with 21 archives from the site.

The author moves beyond traditional boundaries of Egyptological and Papyrological research by means of an innovative and interdisciplinary methodology – zigzagging back and forth between archaeological field survey, close reading of ancient texts, formal methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and explanatory theories and concepts borrowed from economics and other social sciences.

This is a two-volume set.
A Network Analytical Approach to a Bilingual Community. Volume 1.
Author: Lena Tambs
This study tackles pertinent questions about daily life and socio-economic interactions in the late Ptolemaic town of Pathyris (186-88 BCE) through an empirically grounded network analysis of 428 Greek and Demotic documents associated with 21 archives from the site.

The author moves beyond traditional boundaries of Egyptological and Papyrological research by means of an innovative and interdisciplinary methodology – zigzagging back and forth between archaeological field survey, close reading of ancient texts, formal methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and explanatory theories and concepts borrowed from economics and other social sciences.

This is volume 1 of a two-volume set.
A Network Analytical Approach to a Bilingual Community. Volume 2.
Author: Lena Tambs
This study tackles pertinent questions about daily life and socio-economic interactions in the late Ptolemaic town of Pathyris (186-88 BCE) through an empirically grounded network analysis of 428 Greek and Demotic documents associated with 21 archives from the site.

The author moves beyond traditional boundaries of Egyptological and Papyrological research by means of an innovative and interdisciplinary methodology – zigzagging back and forth between archaeological field survey, close reading of ancient texts, formal methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) and explanatory theories and concepts borrowed from economics and other social sciences.

This is volume 2 of a two-volume set.
Author: James D. Moore
The famous German excavations between 1906 and 1908 of Elephantine Island in Egypt produced some of the most important Aramaic sources for understanding the history of Judeans and Arameans living in 5th century BCE Egypt under Persian occupation. Unknown to the world, many papyri fragments from those excavations remained uncatalogued in the Berlin Museum. In New Aramaic Papyri from Elephantine in Berlin James D. Moore edits the remaining legible Aramaic fragments, which belong to letters, contracts, and administrative texts.
Bab el-Gasus (an Arabic expression meaning “The Gate of the Priests”) figures among one of the most important events in Egyptian archaeology: it was not only one of the largest tombs ever found in Egypt, but had also remained completely undisturbed since Antiquity. Excavated by Georges Daressy and Eugène Grébaut in 1891, 153 burials of Amun priests and priestesses were uncovered in its vast galleries, together with a large hoard of funerary equipment consisting of 254 coffins, 110 boxes containing ushebtis, 77 Osiris statues (most of them containing funerary papyri), eight wooden stelae, eight statues of Isis and Nephthys and sixteen canopic jars. Offerings, mats, pottery, floral garlands and fruits covered the floor of the tomb. Later on, after the find had been removed to the Giza Museum, Daressy and his assistants examined some of the mummies and added to the previous record of objects an outstanding collection of artefacts consisting of amulets, wax figurines, cloths, shrouds, sandals and funerary papyri. Due to the size of this discovery, the Egyptian authorities of the time decided to offer a substantial part of the find to nations with diplomatic representation in Egypt. Seventeen nations received such collections, which meant that the find was dispersed throughout Europe, America and the Middle East. The fact that the tomb held an important sample of the Egyptian community of priests and priestesses in Theban society (153 individuals), and provided hundreds of documents that shed light on one of the most obscure periods of Egyptian history, makes it an invaluable resource for the study of the Egyptian material culture. The Gate of the Priests Project is a consortium of institutions involving the University of Coimbra, the University of Leiden, the National Museum of Antiquities of Leiden, the Vatican Museums and the University of California - Los Angeles, among other partners. Its main purpose is to reconstruct the original Bab el-Gasus collection and other Egyptian burials dating from the Third Intermediate Period. Brill´s Gate of the Priests series is the result of this effort to document and study the collection, and aims to publish monographs and critical studies on the funerary culture of the Third Intermediate Period, with a particular focus on Bab el-Gasus and the 21st Dynasty. As such, it intends both to bring together the most significant scholarship undertaken in recent years, as well as to provide a forum in which new approaches can be discussed, in order to restore the original integrity of one of the most important discoveries in the history of Egyptian archaeology.
Receptions of the Ancient Middle East, ca. 1600–1800
The Allure of the Ancient investigates how the ancient Middle East was imagined and appropriated for artistic, scholarly, and political purposes in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Bringing together scholars of the ancient and early modern worlds, the volume approaches reception history from an interdisciplinary perspective, asking how early modern artists and scholars interpreted ancient Middle Eastern civilizations—such as Egypt, Babylonia, and Persia—and how their interpretations were shaped by early modern contexts and concerns.
The volume’s chapters cross disciplinary boundaries in their explorations of art, philosophy, science, and literature, as well as geographical boundaries, spanning from Europe to the Caribbean to Latin America.

Contributors are: Elisa Boeri, Mark Darlow, Nirit Ben-Aryeh Debby, Florian Ebeling, Margaret Geoga, Diane Greco Josefowicz, Andrea L. Middleton, Julia Prest, Felipe Rojas Silva, Maryam Sanjabi, Michael Seymour, John Steele, and Daniel Stolzenberg.
The Realm of the Dead through the Voice of the Living
Author: Julia Hsieh
In Ancient Egyptian Letters to the Dead: The Realm of the Dead through the Voice of the Living Julia Hsieh investigates the beliefs and practices of communicating with the dead in ancient Egypt through close lexical semantic analysis of extant Letters. Hsieh shows how oral indicators, toponyms, and adverbs in these Letters signal a practice that was likely performed aloud in a tomb or necropolis, and how the senders of these Letters demonstrate a belief in the power and omniscience of their deceased relatives and enjoin them to fight malevolent entities and advocate on their behalf in the afterlife. These Letters reflect universals in beliefs and practices and how humankind, past and present, makes sense of existence beyond death.