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C.A. Storey’s Persian Literature: A Bio-Bibliographical Survey is the most authoritative reference work on the Persian written tradition, offering the names of authors and the titles of those of their works that have survived in the Persian language. Storey’s work is for the Persian manuscript tradition what Brockelmann’s is for the Arab world.
Volume I.1: Qurʾānic Literature, History, and Biography
Volume I.2: Biography, Additions, and Corrections
Volume II: Mathematics; Weights, and Measures; Astronomy, and Astrology; Geography; Medicine; Encyclopaedias, and Miscellanies; Arts and Crafts, Science, Occult Arts
Volume III: Lexicography; Grammar; Prosody, and Poetics; Rhetoric, Riddles, and Chronograms; Ornate Prose; Proverbs: Tales
Volume IV: Law; Tradition; Religion, Sufism, Baha’ism, Prayers; Hinduism; Translations from Sanskrit, Hindi, and other Indian Languages, Ethics; Philosophy; Logic
Volume V: Poetry of the Pre-Mongol Period
This series of monographs, edited volumes, and translations promotes the interdisciplinary study of South Asian Islamicate societies by exploring previously neglected archives and voices and showcasing new methodologies. Informed by popular literature, the visual and verbal arts, socio-religious treatises on reform, canonical works of history and culture, and the creative, ideological, literary, and mercantile networks, this series furthers the study of religious, regional, and linguistic reciprocities.
The civilisation of India, marked by an ancient and vast cultural heritage with a strong character of its own, is among the oldest continuous and most seminal of the world, influencing as it does the thought and action of the population of nearly the whole of Asia. The vitality of its tradition still continues to fascinate Man all over the world today.
Brill's Indological Library is concerned with the languages, history and native cultures of South Asia. Subjects include Hinduism, Indian Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism; political, social and economic history; philosophy; literature; languages; native science; performing art; law; the State; foreign relations, and manifestations of the Indian radiance or presence abroad; et cetera.
The series includes monographs on substantial subjects, thematic collections of articles, text editions, and translations. The volumes are in English.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.

This series is indexed in Scopus.
Islamic art is often misrepresented as an iconophobic tradition. As a result of this assumption, the polyvalence of figural artworks made for South Asian Muslim audiences has remained hidden in plain view.
This book situates manuscript illustrations and album paintings within cultures of devotion and ritual shaped by Islamic intellectual and religious histories. Central to this story are the Mughal siblings, Jahanara Begum and Dara Shikoh, and their Sufi guide Mulla Shah.
Through detailed art historical analysis supported by new translations, this study contextualizes artworks made for Indo-Muslim patrons by putting them into direct dialogue with written testimonies.
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Editorial Board / Council Member: , , , , , and
The Gonda Indological Studies publishes scholarly works in the field of classical Indology since 1994. The series is published under the auspices of the J. Gonda Foundation (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences). It contains monographs and collected volumes on topics such as the (cultural) history, material culture, literature, languages, philosophy and religions of South Asia. From 2013 onwards the series will be merged with the Groningen Oriental Studies (GOS), which focuses on philological works, critical editions of texts in Sanskrit and New Indo-Aryan languages, as well as text-related studies.

This critical edition and translation of the Relaçam do Equebar, Rey dos Mogores (1582) and the Commentarius Mongolicae Legationis (1591), the first detailed European accounts on Mughal India written by Antoni de Montserrat, offers an updated and renewed reappraisal of the first Jesuit mission to the Mughal court (1580-1583). It also includes a reassessment of Montserrat’s career, highlighting his role both as a missionary and a diplomatic agent at the Mughal court