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Among the longest continuously performed dramatic forms in the world, nō and kyōgen have a wealth of connections to Japanese culture more broadly construed. The current book brings together under one cover the most important elements of the history and culture of the two arts, profiting from the research of both Japanese and non-Japanese scholars, and offering many new insights.
It takes a more ambitious view of nō and kyōgen than previous studies and represents the achievements of a diverse range of scholars from a broad range of disciplines.
What links are there between Piet Mondrian’s unfinished work Victory Boogie Woogie (1942–4) and post-war Japanese and Japanese-style architectural photography? As far back as the mid-1950s, critics and photographers were inclined to link Mondrian’s painting with modern Japanese architecture and some historians were to go so far as to assert that Mondrian himself had been influenced by traditional Japanese architecture.Powerful associations such as these contributed to the coming together of Western and Japanese architectural modernity. They also underpinned the survival of Japonisme in architecture, or put another way, of the neo-Japonisme that emerged after the Second World War. However, while this kinship between Mondrian’s abstraction and the aesthetic of Japanese architecture is little apparent in architecture, it does show in architectural photography. This book, which takes a sidelong look at Mondrian, examines the works of the foremost among Japanese and American architectural photographers in an effort to interpret the dynamics of how the world of architecture was Japanized between 1945 and 1985.
Scholarly reference works on topics in the religious, literary, social, economic, legal and political history of Japan.

The series published one volume over the last 5 years.
Series Editor:
Since the 1970s, the world has been facing fundamental social change at both the macro-level, such as the impact of globalization and the restructuring of the welfare state, and at the micro-level with issues relating to family and individual lives. It is increasingly accepted that the type of welfare regime heavily influences people’s decision to marry or to have children as well as the relationship between genders. Likewise, the transnational migration of care-workers impacts on the way of life and quality of life of the elderly in the growing number of aged societies around the world as well as on the workers’ own families back in their home countries.

This series linking family research, social policy and migration studies, sets out to shed light at many levels and in a wide variety of contexts on this key twenty-first century issue that could be termed a “reconstruction of the intimate and the public” from an interdisciplinary and global perspective. There is a special focus on Asia where dynamic social changes are resulting in unsustainable societies with extremely low fertility; yet it is such countries that are witnessing the rise in marriage migration to fill the gender gap caused by a skewed sex ratio at birth. Also addressed are issues arising from the alleged convergence of European welfare retrenchment on the one hand, and on the other, the Asian struggle to establish basic welfare state structures at a time of state budget cuts thereby posing the fundamental question regarding the nature of sustainable welfare provision.

The first volume of the IPAP series Ryōsai Kenbo: The Educational Ideal of 'Good Wife, Wise Mother' in Modern Japan has won the 2013 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award.
The third volume of the IPAP series Asian Women and Intimate Work has won the 2014 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

Japanese Visual Culture (JVC) is an academic series devoted to the visual culture of the Japanese archipelago of every era. It includes studies on the history of painting, prints, calligraphy, sculpture, architecture and applied arts, but also extends to the performing arts, cinema, manga and anime. Despite the recent trend away from monographs on individual artists or object-based studies, the Japanese Visual Culture series recognizes the still-crucial need for research on Japanese artists or previously neglected categories of art to help build the foundation for the further development of the field. It also actively seeks interdisciplinary or theoretical approaches to archaeology, religion, literature, and the social sciences. Though all volumes are published in English, the series encourages submission by scholars based in Europe.
The series is attractively designed and allows for copious illustrative material, using the latest technology for high-quality colour reproduction. The books rely on Brill’s well-established distribution networks to research libraries in Europe, North America, and East Asia, especially Japan. While the primary readership will be specialists and students of Japanese art history and related fields, we expect the attractively designed format will attract wider audiences.


If you are working on a book that would be suitable for this series, please do not hesitate to contact Acquisitions Editor Teddi Dols (Teddi.Dols@brill.com).