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Proceedings of the 14th International Colloquium on Gregory of Nyssa (Paris, 4-7 September 2018)
Gregory of Nyssa’s Homilies on the Our Father are the second explanation of this central prayer of Christian worship in Greek Antiquity. Composed at the end of the 4th century, these five homilies offer a spiritual and pastoral commentary of the Pater Noster. The present volume, edited by Matthieu Cassin (Paris), Hélène Grelier-Deneux (Paris) and Françoise Vinel (Strasbourg), offers introductory materials, a new English translation, the first edition of the 15th century Latin translation by Athanasios Chalkeopoulos, together with five studies that form a commentary for the different homilies, and nineteen shorter contributions on various aspects of the text. The contributors envisage the text according to exegesis and theology, but also to philosophy, rhetoric and history of Christian communities.
This volume offers a comprehensive account of a Manichaean community in fourth-century Roman Egypt. The study analyses papyrological material from Kellis, a village in Egypt’s Dakhleh Oasis, and their implications for Manichaeism as a socio-religious movement.

Drawing on social network theory and engaging with current trends in the study of lived ancient religion, Teigen explores how lay families at Kellis cohered as a religious community. Whereas recent scholarship has seen the laity here as largely detached from distinctively Manichaean traditions, he argues that the papyri in fac reveal a community immersed in Manichaean ideas and practices. The book thereby shows how new religious identities were deeply entangled in everyday social life in late antiquity.
Editor: Rengstorf
Scholarly bibliographies and critical studies of literary figures, specific texts and historical issues pertaining to Judaism in the Hellenistic period.
Texts and Studies of Early Christian Life and Language
Vigiliae Christianae Supplements Online publishes scholarly translations, commentary and critical studies of texts and issues relating to early Christianity.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.
Volume Editors: Gregory R. Lanier and J. Nicholas Reid
Studies on the Intersection of Text, Paratext, and Reception brings together thirteen contributions from leading scholars in the fields of textual criticism, manuscript/paratextual research, and reception history. These fields have tended to operate in isolation, but recent years have seen a rise in valuable research being done at their multiple points of intersection. The contributors to this volume show the potential of such crossover work through, for example, exploring how paratextual features of papyri and minuscules give insight into their text; probing how scribal behaviors illumine textual transmission/restoration, and examining how colometry, inner-biblical references, and early church reading cultures may contribute to understanding canon formation. These essays reflect the contours of the scholarship of Dr. Charles E. Hill, to whom the volume is dedicated.
An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics
In Tyconius’ Book of Rules Matthew R. Lynskey explores the church-centric interpretation of ancient biblical exegete Tyconius in his hermeneutical treatise Liber regularum. Influential within his Donatist tradition and the broader context of early North African Christianity, Tyconius wrote one of the earliest works on exegetical theory and praxis in Latin Christianity.
By investigating five key concepts undergirding Tyconius’s theology of church, Lynskey demonstrates how Tyconius’ ecclesiology shaped his hermeneutical enterprise. Through careful readings and close analysis of Liber regularum, this study seeks to describe Tyconius’ exegesis on its own terms, reflecting on notable historical, theological, formational, and missiological implications of his ecclesial exegesis as it concerns the ancient and contemporary church.
The Bible in Ancient Christianity series examines how the Scriptures were interpreted in ancient Christianity, particularly as Scripture functioned in liturgy, in exposition, homilies, in art, in spirituality, and in social issues. The chronological parameters for the series are the first through the fifth centuries. Questions of how Scripture functions will include both, for example, how Augustine interpreted Romans, as well as how Romans was interpreted among various writers. The geographic and chronological breadth of the series means that Eastern as well as Western Christian authorities will be examined. Although the focus will be on widely accepted canonical texts (within these two traditions), the series will not restrict itself to only “orthodox” readings of the texts. Thus, the series might include manuscripts concerning the Gospel of Thomas; and the series might examine how so-called heterodox personalities (e.g., Montanists) used the Bible. Nonetheless the principle aim will be to look at how canonical texts functioned in ancient Christianity.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation
In Learning the Language of Scripture, Mark Randall James offers a new account of theological interpretation as a sapiential practice of learning the language of Scripture, drawing on recently discovered Homilies on the Psalms by the influential early theologian Origen of Alexandria (2nd-3rd c. C.E). Widely regarded as one of the most arbitrary interpreters, James shows that Origen’s appearance of arbitrariness is a result of the modern tendency to neglect the role of wisdom in scriptural interpretation. James demonstrates that Origen offers a compelling model of a Christian pragmatism in which learning and correcting linguistic practice is a site of the transformative pedagogy of the divine Logos.
Das Leben und Wirken eines westgotischen Bischofs des siebten Jahrhunderts
Author: Stefan Pabst
In Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo analysiert Stefan Pabst das Leben und Wirken des westgotischen Bischofs Julian von Toledo (ca. 642–690). Im Anschluss an eine Hinführung zum historischen Umfeld und zur Biographie des Julian werden sämtliche erhaltene Schriften untersucht. Dies betrifft sowohl die nicht-theologischen als auch die theologischen Werke. Im Zentrum der Analyse steht einerseits die Frage nach der Originalität des Autors. Julian zitiert nämlich intensiv aus den Schriften der Kirchenväter, insbesondere des Augustinus. Andererseits werden die Zielgruppe und die Intention jeder einzelnen Schrift eingehend betrachtet. Abschließend wird so ein theologisches Profil des Julian von Toledo entwickelt, das ihn als einen patristischen, einen pädagogisch-pastoralen und damit als einen spezifisch westgotischen Theologen präsentiert.

In Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo Stefan Pabst analyses the life and work of the Visigothic bishop Julian of Toledo (ca. 642–690). After a presentation of Julian's historical environment and biography, all preserved writings are analysed in detail. This includes his non-theological as well as his theological works. While, on the one hand, the analysis focusses on the question of the author’s originality, for Julian quotes extensively from the works of the Church Fathers, Augustine in particular, on the other hand, the author’s addressed audience and the intention of each individual writing are considered in detail as well. As conclusion, Julian’s profile as theologian is presented: He is a patristic and pedagogical-pastoral theologian and thus a specifically Visigothic theologian.
In Exegesis of the Human Heart Andrew J. Summerson explores how Maximus the Confessor uses biblical interpretation to develop an account of human passibility, from fallen human passions to perfected human emotions among the divinized.
This book features Maximus’s role as a creative interpreter of tradition. Maximus inherits Christian thinking on emotion, which revises Stoic and Platonic thought according to biblical categories. Through a close reading of Quaestiones ad Thalassium and a wide selection of Maximus’s works, Andrew J. Summerson shows that Maximus understands human emotion in an exegetical milieu and that Maximus places human emotion at the heart of his soteriology. Christ redeems passibility so the divinized can enjoy perfected emotional activity in the ever-moving repose of eternal life.