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Polish-Language Press, Culture, and Politics
Translator: Scotia Gilroy
In Polish Jews in Israel: Polish-Language Press, Culture, and Politics Elżbieta Kossewska presents a study of the political history of Polish Jews in Israel and their cultural and intellectual achievements, with particular emphasis on the Polish-language press. The book describes Polish immigrants’ adaptation in Israeli society after World War II, and shows the shifting of emigrants’ attitudes and viewpoints against the backdrop of the Israeli political system. The book contains numerous testimonies, memoirs, and personal documents from Polish journalists and writers that have never been published before. These anecdotes, biographical curiosities, and fascinating details create an evocative and colorful picture of the lives of key figures of post-war Polish life in Israel.
Conference Proceedings of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London
The IJS Studies in Judaica series is primarily devoted to the publication of annual conferences of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London, although individual monographs are also welcome on any aspect of Jewish Studies and related disciplines. The volumes bring together, often for the first time, eminent scholars from different countries working in historical, literary, and linguistic research areas relevant to all periods of Jewish Studies, from antiquity to modernity. Examples of themes include biblical studies (within the ancient world), medieval Hebrew science, and history of Zionism, with the aim being to cover the latest trends in cutting-edge research in Jewish Studies in its broadest context.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
This series brings together contributions addressing the question of the unity versus conflict, closeness versus alienation, and convergence versus divergence entrenched in the infinite variety of collective identities illustrated by Jews in this era. The titles included investigate—each volume under its own angle—the principles, narratives, visions and commands which constitute in different places the essentials of Jewishness. As a rule, they ask whether or not one is still allowed to speak, at the beginning of this new century, of one—single and singular—Jewish People. Hence, this series is a podium for researchers of Judaism and the Jewish condition all over the world—from Israel to the United States, and from there to Argentina and Brazil as well as Russia, Ukraine or France, England and Germany. These investigations should yield an understanding of how far Judaism is still one while Jewishness is multifarious. The perspectives offered may draw from sociology and the social sciences as well as from history and the humanities in general. This series aspires to constitute a meeting point for them all. It will be of interest not only to scholars in Jewish Studies but also to anyone interested in the theory and practice of major phenomena of our time like transnational diasporas, the globalization of ethnicity, and present-day relations of religiosity and laicity which, in one way or another, are akin to the preoccupations of researchers in the field of Jewish identities.

The series published an average of four volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Editor: Alexander Kulik
The series is uniquely devoted to Judeo-Slavic studies. It covers all aspects of the history and culture of Jews in the Slavic world and the encounter between Jewish and Slavic cultures (including language, literature, and arts) from the Middle Ages to the present day. The series aims to provide a forum for the growing interest and research in the field across disciplines. It welcomes monographs, collected volumes, and editions of primary sources.

Submission Information:
Proposals may be submitted to Alexander Kulik ( akulik@mscc.huji.ac.il) and should include a brief (up to one page) description including the following items: author(s)/editor(s) names with addresses and affiliations; tentative title; topic; scope; significance; research method; innovation; relation to/difference from similar publications; target audience; date of submission; and provisional table of contents (optional).

The series published an average of one volume per year for the last 5 years.
Brill's Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity E-Books Online, Collection 2021 is the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity in 2021.

Coverage:
Biblical Studies, Ancient Judaism, Ancient Near East, Egyptology, Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnosticism & Manichaeism, Early Church & Patristics

This E-Book Collection is part of Brill's Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity E-Books Online Collection.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.

For other pricing options, consortium arrangements and free 30-day trials contact us at sales-us@brill.com (the Americas) or sales-nl@brill.com (Europe, Middle East, Africa & Asia-Pacific).
Journal of Ancient Judaism – Supplements The Journal of Ancient Judaism Supplement Series (JAJS) addresses the history, texts, and religious formations that make up the rich cultural trace extending from the Babylonian Exile through the Babylonian Talmud. This new interdisciplinary series will serve as a forum of discussion for scholars from all scholarly and religious backgrounds. The editors are especially interested in contributions that cover wide-ranging topics through detailed, closelyworked arguments. Between two and four volumes will typically appear each year. Studies that situate particular inquiries in Hebrew Bible, Second Temple Judaism, or Rabbinics within the broader context of academic Jewish Studies are especially welcome, as are collected studies or edited volumes that reflect on the nature of disciplinary boundaries. As a peer-reviewed series, JAJS has an advisory board whose members will anonymously review manuscripts. Submissions will be accepted in English, German, and French.

Publications from the JAJS series before 2020 can be found at Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht: www.vandenhoeck-ruprecht-verlage.com
This book is an analysis of early Jewish thought on human nature, specifically, the complex of characteristics that are understood to be universally innate, and/or God-given, to collective humanity and the manner which they depict human existence in relationship, or lack thereof, to God. Jewish discourse in the Greco-Roman period (4th c. BCE until 1st c. CE) on human nature was not exclusively particularistic, although the immediate concern was often communal-specific. Evidence shows that many of these discussions were also an attempt to grasp a general, or universal, human nature. The focus of this work has been narrowed to three categories that encapsulate the most prevalent themes in Second Temple Jewish texts, namely, creation, composition, and condition.
Volume Editors: Frank Feder and Matthias Henze
Volume 2 of the Textual History of the Bible is devoted to the deuterocanonical books of the Old Testament, that is, to all books outside the Hebrew Bible that were considered canonical or 'useful for reading' by a church at some point. Earlier studies of the textual histories of these books focused largely on what were considered the most important textual witnesses, mostly in Greek, Latin and possibly in Armenian and Syriac, with the goal of recovering the 'original' text of the book in question. THB 2 breaks significant new ground in this regard. Rather than focusing on a small group of languages only, the goal has been to be exhaustive and to survey all known textual witnesses of all deuterocanonical books, paying particular attention to the manuscript traditions. Rather than viewing these language traditions merely as a way of reaching back to the alleged 'original' text, THB 2 takes language traditions seriously in its own right.

This new approach to the old texts requires the detailed knowledge of many experts, scholars with intimate knowledge of the language traditions and the manuscripts.

2A covers the canonical histories and the textual histories of the deuterocanonical texts in the diverse language traditions. 2B and 2C are devoted to the deuterocanonical books themselves. The chapters on each book begin with an overview article, titled 'Textual History of ...'. This introductory overview is followed by individual entries on each of the known language traditions in which the book is attested, roughly up to the tenth centry C.E.
A Critical Edition, Commentary and Reconstruction. Cambridge Genizah Studies Series, Volume 12
Author: Marc Michaels
In Sefer Tagin Fragments from the Cairo Genizah, Marc Michaels transcribes and recreates fragments of arguably the earliest found manuscript of the manual for sofrim (scribes) concerning the decorative tagin (tittles) and 'strange' letter forms that adorn certain words in the Torah. Comparing these found fragments against other core and secondary sources of Sefer Tagin (including several pages of a new secondary source), Michaels establishes the most likely readings to assist the reconstruction of the fragments and shed light on the original intention of the author of Sefer Tagin.