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This volume invites the reader to a journey into the mystery that is St. Paul the First Hermit. Presented in nine language traditions that span ten centuries of transmission, Paul’s vitae are a case study in cultural fusion and diversity. Assembled here for the first time, they provide the scaffolding for the volume that offers a window into the world of Eastern Christianity that consists of deeply interconnected, diverse communities. We learn about churches and monasteries and libraries; about books and relics; about art and iconography; and about the place of St. Paul in various liturgical traditions.
Aiming to provide the ultimate guide to Byzantine scholarship, this series publishes review monographs with commentary on the current state of the field in Byzantine studies. The series promotes a broad vision of Byzantium, defining it as the society that evolved following Constantine I’s conversion to Christianity and construction of Constantinople as a new capital for the Eastern Roman Empire in the fourth century.

Topics covered include well-established areas of research as well as emergent fields, challenging past historiographical approaches and suggesting new directions for future investigation. Books draw on the latest inter- and multi-disciplinary research in art history and archaeology, culture and society, history, literature, religious studies, and more, to provide critical and accessible analyses suitable for scholars, teachers, and students alike.

If you are interested in writing a Research Perspective, or would like to know more, please get in touch with either the Editor-in-Chief, Dr Mike Humphreys or the Publisher at Brill, Dr Kate Hammond.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
Author:
Marqus ibn Qunbar's Master and Disciple offers the critical edition and translation of a theological treatise that is published here for the first time. Marqus (+1208), a Coptic priest, was a controversial figure who challenged the Coptic hierarchs and eventually joined the Melkites. He argued that auricular confession is indispensible for salvation, but his superiors considered such teaching foreign to the Coptic heritage and incompatible with the Bible and Didascalia. For them, forgiveness is granted through repentance, the liturgy, and general absolution. The contentious disagreement sparked by Marqus among the Coptic community remains a subject of ongoing debate among Christians.
Editor:
Eastern Christian Texts (ECT) is dedicated to the publication of new translated critical editions – or of translations of existing editions –, accompanied by studies and commentaries, of significant works that expressed the intellectual and religious life of Eastern Christian communities from the 1st to the 21st century making them accessible to scholars, students, and the general public.
The Peshitta, the Syriac translation of the Old Testament, was made on the basis of the Hebrew text during the second century CE, whilst some books outside the Hebrew canon may have been translated at a later stage on the basis of a Greek text. It is an important source for our knowledge of the text of the Old Testament. Its language is also of great interest to linguists. Moreover, as Bible of the Syriac Churches it is used in sermons, commentaries, poetry, prayers, and hymns. Many terms specific to the spirituality of the Syriac Churches have their origins in this ancient and reliable version. The present edition, published by the Peshitta Institute of the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam on behalf of the International Organization for the Study of the Old Testament, is the first scholarly edition of this text. It presents the evidence of all known ancient manuscripts and gives full introductions to the individual books.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years (update 2017).
Author:
“The most important of all things sought.” Thus the Syriac Orthodox monk Rabban Daniel Ibn al-Ḥaṭṭāb describes the subject of The Principles of Religion, written in the 13th century, probably in South-East Anatolia. In this treatise, Rabban Daniel Ibn al-Ḥaṭṭāb systematically explained and defended fundamental commitments of Syriac Orthodox theology.
This volume provides an introduction, a critical edition of the Arabic text, an English translation, and extensive commentary on the influences on The Principles of Religion, particularly from Syriac sources. This editio princeps offers the reader a new window into the literary culture of the Syriac Orthodox Church during the years of the Syriac Renaissance.
Syria, Constantinople, Moldavia, Wallachia and the Cossacks’ Lands
Author:
Paul of Aleppo, an archdeacon of the Church of Antioch, journeyed with his father Patriarch Makarios III ibn al-Za'im to Constantinople, Moldavia, Wallachia and the Cossack's lands in 1652-1654, before heading for Moscow. This book presents his travel notes, preceded by his record of the patriarchs of the Church of Antioch and the story of his father's office as a bishop and election to the patriarchal seat. The author gives detailed information on the contemporary events in Ottoman Syria and provides rich and diverse information on the history, culture, and religious life of all the lands he travelled across.
Author:
The Book of Union by Babai the Great (d. 628) is a compendium of christological texts by the famed author at a time when the christological position of the Assyrian Church of the East (also known as the ‘Church of the East’ or the ‘Church of Persia’) became crystalized.
It is the finest representation of the Christology of the Church in Persia, in contrast to diaphysite expression of Byzantium in the Roman East, and the miaphysite expression of the Church in Alexandria and its dependencies. The christological expression of the Church of the East was standardized and canonized by Babai in his christological magnum opus. Accompanied by an introduction and English translation, this volume presents an indispensable text for the study of Christology and its development.
Revisiting Trajectories in the Fourth-Century Christological Debates
In Antioch, Nicaea, and the Synthesis of Constantinople, Dragoș Andrei Giulea delineates a new map of the theological trajectories involved in the fourth-century Christological debates, and envisions the solution of Constantinople 381 as a synthesis of the two theoretical paradigms produced at the councils of Antioch 268 and Nicaea 325. The author argues that the main theological trajectories participating in the debate were the Antiochene, the Arian, the Nicene, the Homoian, and the pro-Nicene.

Giulea redefines the pro-Nicene theology, which dominated the discussions of Constantinople 381, as a synthesis of the most effective metaphysical categories of Antioch and Nicaea. Basil of Caesarea initiated the pro-Nicene synthesis by developing a dual Trinitarian discourse, simultaneously securing ontological individuality and divine unity.