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with Annotated Transcription of Geniza Fragments
Author: Paul Moore
Targum Canticles, composed in the dialectally eclectic idiom of Late Jewish Literary Aramaic (LJLA), had immense historic popularity among Jewish communities worldwide. In this work, Paul R. Moore thoroughly analyses several of the Targum’s grammatical peculiarities, overlooked by previous studies. Through this prism, he considers its literary influences, composition, and LJLA as a precursor of the highly eccentric Aramaic of the 13th century Spanish cabalistic masterpiece, The Zohar. The study includes transcriptions and analysis of the previously unpublished of fragments of the Targum from the Cairo Geniza, and what is possibly its earliest, known translation into Judaeo-Arabic.
Italian Translations of Hebrew Literature in the Early Modern Period
This volume presents the culmination of research on an almost ignored literary corpus: the translations into literary Italian of classical Hebrew texts made by Jews between 1550 and 1650. It includes dozens of poetical and philosophical texts and wisdom literature as well as dictionaries and biblical translations produced in what their authors viewed as a national tongue, common to Christians and Jews. In so doing, the authors/translators explicitly left behind the so-called Judeo-Italian. These texts, many of them being published for the first time, are studied in the context of intellectual and literary history. The book is an original contribution showing that the linguistic acculturation of German Jews in the late 18th century occurred in Italy 150 years earlier.
Author: Mahmoud Kayyal
Can translations fuel intractable conflicts or contribute to calming them? To what extent do translators belonging to conflicting cultures find themselves committed to their ethnic identity and its narratives? How do translators on the seam line between the two cultures behave? Does colonial supremacy encourage translators to strengthen cultural and linguistic hegemony or rather undermine it? Mahmoud Kayyal tries to answer these questions and others in this book by examining mutual translations in the shadow of the Arab-Israeli conflict and the hegemony relations between Israel and the Palestinians.
Author: Aaron Prevots
Dans Esther Tellermann: Énigme, prière, identité, première monographie consacrée à l’œuvre de l’écrivain, Aaron Prevots met en lumière un regard poétique novateur sur des réalités tant intérieures qu’extérieures. Il montre comment Tellermann (1947-) explore l’intime du monde, ses textures et ses contours, ses terres insituables semblant s’entrecroiser, et le rêve et le mythe faits tremplin pour une traversée renouvelée de l’Histoire et du deuil. Il appréhende le caractère énigmatique de longues suites de chants dont la forme peut s’apparenter à celle de la prière, ainsi que les enjeux identitaires d’un dire singulièrement ouvert à l’Autre. En examinant des textes de 1999-2019, Aaron Prevots souligne le lyrisme décentré d’un poète majeur et la présence de ses pairs comme interlocuteurs.

In Esther Tellermann: Enigma, Prayer, Identity, the first book-length study of the writer’s œuvre, Aaron Prevots highlights her innovative poetic approach to inner and outer realities. He shows how Tellermann (1947-) explores the world’s innermost structures, its textures and contours, its indeterminate places that seemingly intersect, and dreams and myth as springboards for experiencing anew historical turning points and timeless rites of mourning. He considers the enigmatic quality of long suites of poetic song whose form can resemble that of prayer, as well as the stakes regarding identity when poetic expression foregrounds openness to the Other. In examining texts from 1999-2019, Aaron Prevots emphasizes this major poet’s decentered lyricism and the presence of fellow writers as interlocutors.
This book conducts a focused study of contradictions and coherence in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan. The first section of this study examines the apparent disruption of congruity with regard to the vertical dimension of the Targum, that is, between the Torah (the Hebrew Vorlage) and the Targum (the Aramaic translation). The second section addresses the apparent disruption of congruity with regard to the horizontal dimension of the Targum, that is, within the boundaries of the TgPsJ corpus. Ultimately, this work suggests that the contradictions are given to resolution, once the greater context of biblical and Jewish tradition is taken into consideration.
Author: Michael Rand
This work contains a Hebrew and an English section. The former is an edition of the Maḥberot Eitan ha-Ezraḥi, a maqama collection composed after the pattern of al-Ḥarizi’s Taḥkemoni. The edition opens with an introduction, translated at the beginning of the English section. The rest of the English section is devoted to an analysis of that branch of the Hebrew maqama tradition that is rooted in the Maqāmāt of al-Ḥarīrī, starting from a review of the evidence for the presence of the Maqāmāt in the world of Hebrew letters, through the Taḥkemoni, and concluding with the Maḥbarot of Immanuel ha-Romi.
Author: Annegret Oehme
This volume explores a core medieval myth, the tale of an Arthurian knight called Wigalois, and the ways it connects the Yiddish-speaking Jews and the German-speaking non-Jews of the Holy Roman Empire. The German Wigalois / Viduvilt adaptations grow from a multistage process: a German text adapted into Yiddish adapted into German, creating adaptations actively shaped by a minority culture within a majority culture. The Knight without Boundaries examines five key moments in the Wigalois / Viduvilt tradition that highlight transitions between narratological and meta-narratological patterns and audiences of different religious-cultural or lingual background.
The Apocalypse of Abraham is a pseudepigraphal work that narrates Abraham’s rejection of idol worship and his subsequent ascent to heaven, where he is shown eschatological secrets through angelic mediation. This fascinating text was only preserved in Old Church Slavonic and must be studied as both a medieval Christian and an ancient Jewish text. This monograph addresses the following questions:
-Why were medieval Slavs translating and reading Jewish pseudepigrapha?
-How much, if at all, did they emend or edit the Apocalypse of Abraham?
-When in antiquity was it most likely written?
-What were its ancient Jewish social and theological contexts?
Tanhuma-Yelammedenu Literature enables a rare and unique look into the Jewish society of late antiquity and the early Byzantine period, especially the interaction between the beit-midrash and the synagogue cultures. This little-studied corpus is the focus of the present volume, in which various authors study historical, philological, cultural or linguistic aspects of this literature. The result is a body of work dedicated to this important corpus, and is a first step into giving it its proper place in Jewish Studies.