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Author: Ari Ackerman
This work focuses on the conception of God of the medieval Jewish philosopher and legal scholar, Hasdai Crescas (1340-1410/11). It demonstrates that Crescas’ God is infinitely creative and good and explores the parallel that Crescas implicitly draws between God as creator and legislator, which is rooted in his understanding of the Deity as continuously involved in generative activity through the outpouring of goodness and love as manifest by multiple, simultaneous and successive worlds and a perpetually expanding Torah. It also reviews the Maimonidean background for Crescas’ position and suggests that Crescas is countering Maimonides’ stance that creation is limited to a single moment and Maimonides’ notion of the Torah as perfect and immutable.
Editor: Giuseppe Veltri
Maimonides Review of Philosophy and Religion is an annual collection of double-blind peer-reviewed articles, which seeks to provide a broad international arena for an intellectual exchange of ideas between the disciplines of philosophy, theology, religion, cultural history, and literature and to showcase their multifarious junctures within the framework of Jewish studies.
Editor: Ze'ev Strauss
The Maimonides Review of Philosophy and Religion is an annual collection of double-blind peer-reviewed articles that seeks to provide a broad international arena for an intellectual exchange of ideas between the disciplines of philosophy, theology, religion, cultural history, and literature and to showcase their multifarious junctures within the framework of Jewish studies. Contributions to the Review place special thematic emphasis on scepticism within Jewish thought and its links to other religious traditions and secular worldviews. The Review is interested in the tension at the heart of matters of reason and faith, rationalism and mysticism, theory and practice, narrativity and normativity, doubt and dogma. This volume features contributions by Reimund Leicht, Gitit Holzman, Jonathan Garb, Anna Lissa, Gianni Paganini, Adi Louria Hayon, Mark Marion Gondelman, and Jürgen Sarnowsky.
Jacob Taubes is one of the most significant intellectual figures in the more recent German intellectual scene—and beyond. However, Taubes was either dismissed as a highly controversial character, or as a mere commentator of ongoing debates, or the reception was restricted to his considerations on religion and the ambivalences of secularity. This volume challenges these reductions by putting Taubes' original, albeit marginalised, texts into new, sometimes surprising contexts. Furthermore, it relates familiar topics in his oeuvre to lesser-known themes that are still highly pertinent for contemporary discussions on faith, modernity, and the limits of politics.
The medical compendium entitled Zād al-musāfir wa-qūt al-ḥāḍir (Provisions for the Traveller and Nourishment for the Sedentary) and compiled by Ibn al-Jazzār from Qayrawān in the tenth century is one of the most influential handbooks in the history of western medicine. In the eleventh century, Constantine the African translated it into Latin; this translation was the basis for several commentaries compiled from the twelfth century on. The text was also translated into Byzantine Greek and three times into medieval Hebrew. The present volume includes a new critical edition of the Arabic text of books I and II, along with an annotated English translation, as well as critical editions of Constantine’s Viaticum and the Hebrew versions by Ibn Tibbon, Abraham ben Isaac, and Do’eg ha-Edomi.
David Novak is widely recognized as one of the most prominent Jewish thinkers in North America today and his most important contribution to philosophy has been his work on natural law. This book is an exploration of the shift in the content and context of that theory by reference to the metaphysical meaning that Novak ultimately assigns to reason. This change is then analyzed within the framework of Novak’s covenantal theology and his developing view of redemption in particular. Through this examination, this book highlights the contribution of Novak's natural law theory to the continuing debate over the role of reason in Judaism.
Author: Joseph Citron
In this book, Joseph Citron offers the first comprehensive analysis of Prague Rabbi Isaiah Horowitz’s (c.1565-c.1626) magnum opus of Jewish ethical literature, the Shnei Luhot Ha-Berit. Citron’s close philological analysis reveals the pioneering nature of the work in creating an organic Jewish theological system rooted in the mystical structures of Kabbalah, cultivating an orthodoxy in thought and legal practice based upon its principles. It provided a platform for laypeople to attain great spiritual heights by emphasising that God could be served and cleaved to through mundane activity, and that Judaism demanded deep emotion and joy as much as Talmudic erudition or meticulous observance. The Shelah's paradigms significantly influenced 17th-century Sabbatean movement, the 18th-century Hasidic movement, and Jewish Orthodoxy in the 19th century. The book is essential for scholars and laypeople alike wishing to understand the evolution of Judaism in Central and Eastern Europe in the early modern period.
Author: Gerrit Bos
This edition contains the collected English translations of the series The Medical Works of Moses Maimonides (17 vols., 2002–2021) that were published by Gerrit Bos in parallel critical editions along with the original Arabic texts. The collection offers three main medical treatises by Maimonides (1138–1204) (Medical Aphorisms; Commentary on Hippocrates’ Aphorisms; On Poisons and the Protection against Lethal Drugs and six minor ones (On Coitus; On the Regimen of Health; On the Elucidation of Some Symptoms and the Response to Them; On Hemorrhoids; On Asthma; On Rules Regarding the Practical Part of the Medical Art, presented for the first time in one harmonized volume, supplemented by indexes of diseases, medicinal ingredients, and quoted physicians.
Author: Gerrit Bos
This volume is both a continuation of the four already published titles in the series (2011–19) and an addition to the Concise Dictionary of Novel Medical and General Hebrew Terminology from the Middle Ages. It continues mapping the medical terminology featured in medieval Hebrew medical works in order to facilitate study of medical terms that do not appear in the existing dictionaries, as well as identifying the medical terminology used by specific authors and translators in order to identify anonymous medical material.

The terminology discussed in this volume has been derived from fourteen different sources, including translations of Ibn al-Jazzār’s Zād al-musāfir by Moses ibn Tibbon (Sefer Ṣedat ha-Derakhim) and the otherwise unknown Abraham ben Isaac (Sefer Ṣedah la-Oreḥim), as well as the translation of Constantine the Africanʼs Latin version (Viaticum) prepared by Do’eg ha-Edomi (Sefer Yaʾir Netiv).
Editor: Giuseppe Veltri
The Maimonides Library for Philosophy and Religion aims to present a wide spectrum of studies and texts that cover philosophy and religion in a Jewish context, broadly construed. The series seeks to explore connections, tensions, and dialectics between philosophy and religion in Jewish tradition through monographs, collected volumes, scholarly translations, and critical editions of key texts. Special emphasis will be given to unearth sceptical elements within Jewish thought and in relation to other traditions, as well as to its interactions with the scientific and intellectual climate in which it is situated.