Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 451 items for :

  • Ancient Philosophy x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Paul's inconsistency on the Jewish law is a persistent scholarly problem. He can argue vociferously against circumcision but also acknowledge its potential benefit. He expresses pride in his ancestral law and practices, but also describes them in terms of slavery, curses, and rubbish. What are we to make of this? In this volume, Annalisa Phillips Wilson offers a fresh approach. Her comparison of Paul's texts with Stoic ethical reasoning demonstrates that his discourse on Jewish practices reflects Stoic discourse patterns on neutral selections and activities, discourse designed to establish one category of incommensurable worth.
Volume Editors: Jana Schultz and James Wilberding
Sosipatra, Hypatia, Macrina: some of the most famous female philosophers of antiquity were connected to Neoplatonism. But what does it mean to be a woman philosopher in late antiquity? How is the inclusive nature of the Neoplatonic schools connected to their ethical, political, and metaphysical ideas? What role does the religious dimension of late Neoplatonism and the role of women as priestesses play in understanding Neoplatonic women philosophers?
This book offers thirteen essays that examine women and the female in Neoplatonism from a variety of perspectives, paying particular attention to the interactions between the metaphysics, psychology, and ethics.
Volume 4: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and the Middle Ages. B. Manuscripts, a Basis of Knowledge and Science, C. History of the Discipline, D. Obituaries, E. Indices
Author: Hans Daiber
From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.
Suppression and Selection in the Lives and Moralia
The act of recording anything is at the same time an act of silencing. Choices are made at every step about what to keep and what to discard. Examining what Plutarch has left out enriches our understanding of what he has chosen to say, and both deepens our knowledge of the literary practices of this influential writer and opens new and fruitful lines of enquiry about Plutarch, his work, and his world.
Platons Antwort an Protagoras im ‘Theaitetos’ und im ‘Protagoras’
Protagoras beansprucht, die Jugend erziehen zu können. Warum nicht? Wenn «Mensch Maß aller Dinge» ist, kann jeder jeden ‘besser’ machen… Für Plato geht das nicht auf. Insofern Pädagogik Menschen dazu bringen will, ‘bessere’ Wesen zu werden, verlangt sie nach Plato ein gesundes Verständnis von ‘Sein’ überhaupt. Diese Studie untersucht die ontologischen Implikationen des Homo mensura-Satzes, Protagoras’ Prämisse, im ‘Theaitetos’ – einem Dialog, der selten ontologisch gelesen wird. Wenn der protagoräische Prämisse den pädagogischen Anspruch nicht trägt, dürfte der ‘Protagoras’ gar nicht eigentlich von den erzieherischen Fragen handeln, die diskutiert werden. Es könnte sich herausstellen, dass er einen ‘verborgenen’ Diskurs enthält…

Protagoras claims to be able to educate the young. If «Man is Measure of Everything», anybody can make everybody ‘better’… To Plato, this doesn't add up. Insofar as pedagogy aims at making humans become better beings, to Plato it supposes a sound conception of ‘being’ per se. This study explores the ontological implications of homo mensura, Protagoras’ premiss, in the ‘Theaetetus’ – a dialogue which is rarely read ontologically. If the Protagorean premiss doesn't support the pedagogical claim, the ‘Protagoras’ might not even be about the educational questions under discussion, but turn out to contain a ‘hidden’ discourse…
Volume Editor: Diego Zucca
What is knowledge? This fundamental question is treated with unprecedented depth by Plato in his Theaetetus, where it opens the path to many puzzles and issues we are still coping with in our days: what is the nature of perception, belief, justification, truth? Which objects can be properly known? How are we to account for cognitive mistakes? How can the mind be "in touch" with the world? This book provides fresh, rigorous and original explorations of the main themes of the dialogue by well-established scholars who work on Plato and Platonism, especially on Plato's theory of knowledge.
Author: Emmanuel Bermon
Écrite entre 386 et 390 dans l’effervescence de la découverte du néoplatonisme, la correspondance entre Augustin et son ami Nebridius est un concentré de questions platoniciennes sur l’infini, la distinction entre le sensible et l’intelligible, l’imagination et la réminiscence, les rêves inspirés, l’assimilation à Dieu, le « véhicule » de l’âme, l’intériorité et l’individualité. S’y ajoutent des développements théologiques majeurs sur l’Incarnation et la Trinité. Grâce à ces lettres qui font tour à tour « entendre le Christ, Platon et Plotin », comme le dit Nebridius lui-même, nous comprenons mieux ce moment incandescent de la vie d’Augustin où il se convertit à la fois à la philosophie et au christianisme, comme en témoigneront plus tard les Confessions.

Written between 386 and 390 during the excitement of his discovery of Neoplatonism, Augustine’s correspondence with his friend Nebridius is a distillation of Platonic questions concerning the infinite, the distinction between sensible and intelligible phenomena, the imagination and recollection, inspired dreams, assimilation to God, the “vehicle” of the soul, interiority, and individuality. In addition, the exchange contains major theological insights concerning the Incarnation and the Trinity. Thanks to these letters, which, as Nebridius himself says, make “Christ, Plato, and Plotinus heard,” we can better understand this incandescent moment in Augustine’s life when he converted to both philosophy and Christianity, as the Confessions will later testify.