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Die bewegte Biographie des Paderborner Erzbischofs Lorenz Kardinal Jaeger (1892-1975) wird unter Verwendung seines neu erschlossenen Nachlasses in einem interdisziplinären Forschungsprojekt anhand von Themenschwerpunkten erarbeitet.

Lorenz Jaeger wurde unter den Bedingungen des totalitären NS-Staates 1941 zum Erzbischof von Paderborn ernannt. Wie lässt sich Jaegers Haltung zum Nationalsozialismus rückwirkend bewerten? Ein weiterer Schwerpunkt des Bandes liegt auf seinem gesellschafts- und parteipolitischen Wirken in der BRD. Welche Kontinuitätslinien und Lernprozesse lassen sich bei ihm ausmachen? Jaeger identifizierte sich über die Adenauer-Regierung mit dem demokratischen System der BRD, vollzog eine innere Demokratisierung in den 60er Jahren aber nicht mehr mit. 1965 überkreuzten sich zwei Entwicklungen: Während Jaeger seit seiner Ernennung zum Kardinal in der Lokalpresse als „Ökumeniker“ gefeiert wurde, kam zunehmend Kritik an der Rolle der katholischen Bischöfe im „Dritten Reich“ auf.
This volume provides an overview of the development of the Patriarchate of Constantinople from Late Antiquity to the Early Ottoman period (4th to 15th c.). It highlights continuities and changes in the organizational, dogmatic, and intellectual framework of the central ecclesiastical institution of the Byzantine Empire in the face of political and religious upheavals. The volume pays attention to the relations of the Patriarchate with other churches in the West and in the East. Across the disciplinary divide between Byzantine and Ottoman studies, the volume explains the longevity of the Patriarchate beyond the fall of Byzantium in 1453 up to modern times. A particular focus is laid on an original register book of the 14th century.

Contributors are: Claudia Rapp, Frederick Lauritzen, Tia M. Kolbaba, Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Marie-Hélène Blanchet, Dimitrios G. Apostolopoulos, Machi Païzi-Apostolopoulou, Klaus-Peter Todt, Mihailo S. Popović, Konstantinos Vetochnikov, Ekaterini Mitsiou, Vratislav Zervan, and Christian Gastgeber.
L’écolâtre cathédral en France septentrionale du ixe au xiiie siècle
Author: Thierry Kouamé
This book traces the history of one of the central actors in the transformation of the Western educational system between the 9th and 13th centuries: the cathedral schoolmaster. Originally responsible for running the episcopal school, this ecclesiastical official eventually became a true school administrator with a territorial monopoly and coercive powers, including in particular issuing ‘licentia docendi’ to masters under his jurisdiction. Using a wide range of sources and taking in thirty-nine dioceses in northern France, the study analyses the construction of the office from the Carolingian period, the place of the schoolmaster within the canonical community and in feudal society, and the institutionalisation of his function with the Gregorian Reform and the birth of universities.
Publication History and Catholic Missions in the Spanish World (Spain, New Spain, and the Philippines, 1597–1700)
In The Martyrs of Japan, Rady Roldán-Figueroa examines the role that Catholic missionary orders played in the dissemination of accounts of Christian martyrdom in Japan. The work combines several historiographical approaches, including publication history, history of missions, and “new” institutional history. The author offers an overarching portrayal of the writing, printing, and circulation of books of ‘Japano-martyrology.’
The book is organized into two parts. The first part, “Spirituality of Writing, Publication History, and Japano-martyrology,” addresses topics ranging from the historical background of Christianity in Japan to the publishers of Japano-martyrology. The second part, “Jesuits, Discalced Franciscans, and the Production of Japano-martyrology in the Early Modern Spanish World,” features closer analysis of selected works of Japano-martyrology by Jesuit and Discalced Franciscan writers.
Author: Stuart Masters
During the 1650s, James Nayler was one of the most important leaders of the emerging Quaker movement in England and, arguably, its most effective preacher and writer. However, his legacy has been dominated by events that took place in the summer and autumn of 1656, leading to a conviction for blasphemy, brutal public punishment, and imprisonment. Official histories of Quaker beginnings portrayed him as a gifted, but flawed, character, who brought the Quaker movement into disrepute, and prompted a concern for corporate order. Scholarship during the past century has begun to question this received position. However, a continued preoccupation with his ‘fall’ has tended to overshadow interpretations of his writings. In this volume, Stuart Masters seeks to identify a number of important theological themes visible within Nayler’s works, and to locate them within their radical religious context. He argues that a powerful Christological vision at the heart of Nayler’s religious thought engendered a practical theology with radical political, economic, and ecological implications.
In this book Elizabeth Walgenbach argues that outlawry in medieval Iceland was a punishment shaped by the conventions of excommunication as it developed in the medieval Church. Excommunication and outlawry resemble one another, often closely, in a range of Icelandic texts, including lawcodes and narrative sources such as the contemporary sagas. This is not a chance resemblance but a by-product of the way the law was formed and written. Canon law helped to shape the outlines of secular justice.
The book is organized into chapters on excommunication, outlawry, outlawry as secular excommunication, and two case studies—one focused on the conflicts surrounding Bishop Guðmundr Arason and another focused on the outlaw Aron Hjǫrleifsson.
Latin and German Documents from Heinricus Institoris’s Witch Hunts in Ravensburg and Innsbruck
This is the companion volume to the author's “An Unusual Inquisition”: Translated Documents from Heinricus Institoris’s Witch Hunts in Ravensburg and Innsbruck (Brill, 2020), and contains a full edition of the Latin and German documents illustrating Heinricus Institoris's activities as prosecutor of witchcraft in Ravensburg in 1484 and Innsbruck in 1485. These events had a great influence on Institoris's composition of the Malleus Maleficarum, the most famous and influential early-modern textbook on witchcraft. This is the only full and complete edition of these documents, some of which have not previously been published in their entirety, and the texts greatly illuminate the historical setting of the composition of one of history's most notorious books.