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Intercultural Engagements with Architecture and Craft in the Age of Travel and Reform
Author: Mercedes Volait
The commodification of Islamic antiques intensified in the late Ottoman Empire, an age of domestic reform and increased European interference following the Tanzimat (reorganisation) of 1839. Mercedes Volait examines the social life of typical objects moving from Cairo and Damascus to Paris, London, and beyond, uncovers the range of agencies and subjectivities involved in the trade of architectural salvage and historic handicraft, and traces impacts on private interiors, through creative reuse and Revival design, in Egypt, Europe and America. By devoting attention to both local and global engagements with Middle Eastern tangible heritage, the present volume invites to look anew at Orientalism in art and interior design, the canon of Islamic architecture and the translocation of historic works of art.
Sculpture in Print, 1480–1600 is the first in-depth study dedicated to the intriguing history of the translation of statues and reliefs into print. The multitude of engravings, woodcuts and etchings show a highly creative handling of the ‘original’ antique or contemporary work of art. The essays in this volume reflect these various approaches to and challenges of translating sculpture in print. They analyze foremost the beginnings of the phenomenon in Italian and Northern Renaissance prints and they highlight by means of case studies amongst many other topics the interrelated terminology between sculpture and print, lost models in print, the inventive handling of fragments, as well as the transformation of statues into narrative contexts.
The essays in Visualizing the Past in Italian Renaissance Art address a foundational concept that was as central to early modern thinking as it is to our own: that the past is always an important part of the present. Written by the friends, students, and colleagues of Dr. Brian Curran, former professor of Art History at the Pennsylvania State University, these authors demonstrate how reverberations of the past within the present are intrinsic to the ways in which we think about the history of art. Examinations of sculpture, painting, and architecture reveal the myriad ways that history has been appropriated, reinvented, and rewritten as subsequent generations—including the authors collected here—have attained new insight into the past and present.

Contributors: Denise Costanzo, William E. Wallace, Theresa A. Kutasz Christensen, Ingrid Rowland, Anthony Cutler, Marilyn Aronberg Lavin, Louis Alexander Waldman, Elizabeth Petersen Cyron, Stuart Lingo, Jessica Boehman, Katherine M. Bentz, Robin L. Thomas, and John Pinto.
Cultural Negotiations and Artistic Translations in the Middle Ages and 19th-century Historicism
Volume Editor: Francine Giese
Mudejarismo and Moorish Revival in Europe examines key aspects related to the reception of Ibero-Islamic architecture in medieval Iberia and 19th-century Europe. It challenges prevalent readings of architecture and interiors whose creation was the result of cultural encounters. As Mudéjar and neo-Moorish architecture are closely connected to the Islamic world, concepts of identity, nationalism, religious and ethnic belonging, as well as Orientalism and Islamoscepticism significantly shaped the way in which they have been perceived over time. This volume offers art historical and socio-cultural analysis of selected case studies from Spain to Russia and opens the door to a better understanding of interconnected cultural and artistic phenomena.
Contributors are (in order of appearance) Francine Giese, Ariane Varela Braga, Michael A. Conrad, Katrin Kaufmann, Sarah Keller, Elena Paulino Montero, Luis Araus Ballesteros, Ekaterina Savinova, Christian Schweizer, Alejandro Jiménez Hernández and Laura Álvarez Acosta.
Author: Robert Couzin
Robert Couzin’s Right and Left in Early Christian and Medieval Art is the first in-depth study of handedness, position, and direction in the visual culture of Europe and Byzantium from the fourth to the fourteenth century. Heretofore largely unnoticed or ignored, the pre-eminence of the right and lapses or intentional departures from that norm in medieval imagery are relevant to such major themes as iconography, visuality, reception, narrative, form, gender, production, and patronage. The author’s investigation of right and left in visual culture is informed by modern experimental research on laterality and contextualized within prevailing theological doctrines and socio-cultural practices.

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Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts presents extended reference articles on topics within the comprehensive field of world religions and the arts, from the traditional fine arts to newer fields of visual culture and material culture. References will be hyperlinked to original source materials when possible, offering both scholars and students the opportunity to stay current with the literature or to begin their research. Written as a single-author monograph with accompanying critical bibliography, each 50 to 100 page article provides an overview of the specific topic, its history within the larger discipline of religion and the arts, recent innovations in scholarship, critical commentary, and the unique analysis of the author's perspectives.
This volume explores engagement with Greco-Roman Antiquity across Europe and beyond in the 18th century. Approximately 100 experts, in some 140 articles from “Academy” to “Wallpaper”, show how Classical and rival antiquities were perceived and studied during the age of Enlightenment, revolution and scientific progress, and how they served the formulation and affirmation of new ideals. The survey covers the period between the outbreak of the Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes in France in 1687 and the reorganization of Europe at the Congress of Vienna in 1815.

Articles examine the spheres of society within which engagement with Antiquity took place in the 18th century, the specific subject areas in which it took place, and the media by which it was propagated. Reception of Antiquity in the 18th century was by no means limited to theoretical discourses. On the contrary, the period’s growing interest in sensuality and experience also required the relics of Antiquity and their modern echoes and evocations to be explored with all the senses. Focus therefore widened beyond the canonical bounds of reception in the spheres of culture, education, philosophy, religion, law and economics to encompass the perception of Antiquity in everyday and popular culture.
In Applied Emblems in the Cathedral of Lugo, Carme López Calderón explores the emblematic programme found in the Chapel of Nuestra Señora de los Ojos Grandes (Galicia, Spain), consisting of fifty-eight emblems painted c. 1735. Making use of a wide range of printed sources, the author delves into the meaning of each emblem and provides an all-encompassing interpretation of this cycle, which can rightly be described as the richest and most complete programme of Marian applied emblematics in the Iberian Peninsula.