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Volume 1: Reports of the Trials: Morotai, Wewak, Labuan and Darwin
Volume Editors: and
This is the first volume of a new 5-volume reference work which rectifies a lamentable gap in access to rich war crimes trial jurisprudence from the post-World War II era. The 5 volumes will compile a comprehensive and systematic collection of Law Reports of the 300 trials by Australian Military Courts held between 1945 and 1951. Those trials were held in eight locations and reports of the trials are grouped according to location. To introduce each trial location, a contextual essay provides background analysis explaining why the particular trials were conducted in that location.

This first volume includes reports for each of the 46 trials conducted in Morotai, Wewak, Labuan and Darwin in 1945-46. Given the lack of written reasons for judgment, these law reports draw extensively on the trial transcripts, including a description of prosecution and defence arguments, relevant legal issues, judgments and sentences. Launched at a propitious time in which Australia is engaged in a significant criminal investigation of alleged war crimes in Afghanistan, the reference work provides a rich and unrivalled resource and will be of lasting value both within Australia and outside it amongst scholars of the history of World War II and the development of international criminal law as well as to practitioners involved in contemporary war crimes trials. Many other Allied nations conducted their own military trials in both the European and Pacific theatres post-WWII, and the Australian experience, documented in these unique volumes, offers an important template for other national initiatives of this kind.
How to legally assess the situation when humanitarian actors in non-international armed conflicts are arbitrarily denied access to the affected civilian population? The book answers this question from the perspective of the five main actors involved in humanitarian relief in non-international armed conflicts: the affected State, non-State armed groups, humanitarian actors, non-belligerent States and the affected civilian population. It examines the legal regulations and consequences for each of these actors. In doing so, the book not only draws attention to existing legal gaps and challenges, but also encourages readers to rethink outdated legal concepts and discuss new approaches.

The open access publication of this book has been published with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation.
Festschrift in Honour of Judge Hisashi Owada
Volume Editor:
The Festschrift New Trends in International Law is a collective work which reflects the contributions of Judge Owada to the development of international law, and also deals with various issues of modern international law which have been challenged by the third world. The contributors are jurists from the ICJ and ILOS whose judgments and advisory opinions constitute the formal sources of modern international law. New Trends in International Law also presents contributions from a number of the most highly qualified scholars of various nations whose specialisations are frequently adopted as material sources of international law New Trends in International Law is an invaluable resource for modern international law which provides the entire spectrum of its evolution and its key challenges. It provides an ideal reference source for students, post-graduate researchers, practitioners, functionaries of international institutions, as well as government officials in charge of foreign affairs.
The Yearbook is also available online. To learn more about the online version, please click here.

The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives.

Volume One features a thematic section on the Draft Articles of the ILC on the “Protection of Persons in the Event of Disasters” as well as a general selection of articles, and an international and regional review of International Disaster Law in Practice, plus book reviews and bibliography.

The Yearbook is also available online. To learn more about the online version, please click here.
Like many concepts in international law, the definition of “necessity” varies widely depending on context. The concepts of necessity in different fields of international law can maintain their unique definitions while learning from each other, and thereby achieve coherence. This book presents the evolution of the concept of necessity, and discusses its definitions in nine different fields of international law. Centering customary international law and the law of the World Trade Organization in his analysis, Dr. Senai W. Andemariam examines the potential for interactions and coherence between concepts of necessity in various fields of international law.
From the Highlands of Papua New Guinea to the Island of Malta
How international is international humanitarian law? The Laws of Yesterday's Wars 3: From Highland New Guinea to the Island of Malta, together with its companion volumes, The Laws of Yesterday’s Wars: From Indigenous Australians to the American Civil War (Brill-Nijhoff, 2021) and The Laws of Yesterday's Wars 2: From Ancient India to East Africa (Brill-Nijhoff, 2022), attempts to answer that question. It offers a culture-by-culture account of various unique restrictions placed on warfare over time. Containing essays by a range of laws of war academics and practitioners, it approaches the laws of yesterday’s wars from a wide cross-section of history and culture, seeking to find any common ground and to demonstrate a history of international law outside the usual confines of its ‘development’ by Europeans and its later ‘contributions.’ This volume includes studies on Mongol, Iban and Ottoman rules of war.
“In the face of such ‘unspeakable truths,’ wouldn’t it be better to simply, quietly bow down?” (Kora Andrieu: Sorry for the Genocide, 2009). This book takes an interdisciplinary approach to the question of colonial crimes. In order to reconcile with massive systemic injustice, not only the historical foundations and legal questions are relevant, but also political viewpoints and peace ethics. The book demonstrates that, in the face of extreme violence, even genocide, a political apology can be an effective tool for conflict transformation, even when the injustice is far in the past.
This collection of chapters tracks and explains the impact of the nine core United Nations human rights treaties in 20 selected countries, four from each of the five UN regions. Researchers based in each of these countries were responsible for the chapters, in which they assess the influence of the treaties and treaty body recommendations on legislation, policies, court decisions and practices. By covering the 20 years between July 1999 and June 2019, this book updates a study done 20 years ago.
Author:
Various forms of control play a central role in our lives. However, the nature of control is a difficult conundrum to probe. Believing we "control" ourselves, nature or others may seem like a sign of autonomy, power and self-determination, but it is often an illusion and not always desirable. Art practices help us make sense of the questions and paradoxes related to the enhancing interplay between control and non-control by putting them on display. What happens if this interplay between the two poles collapses? What are the consequences for our forms of life?