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What constitutes the core values, tenets, cultural, historic, and ideological parameters of secularism in international contexts? In twelve chapters, this edited work examines current tensions in liberal secular states where myriad rights and freedoms compete regarding education, healthcare, end-of-life choices, clothing, sexual orientation, reproduction, and minority interests. It explores the legal complexity of defining a ‘religion’ through judicial decisions and scrutinises Christianity, Hinduism and Islam’s relative success in accommodating religious pluralism.

Part One explores the religious practice and persecution nexus, COVID-19’s effect on religious freedom, religious education, burqas/headscarves, and religious culture in civil law. Part Two explores the constitutional principle of secularism in Member States of the Council of Europe, US Religious Clauses, and religious freedom in South Africa, UK, Australia, and India.
Author: Noah Vardi
This series critically examines issues of legal doctrine and practice in Central and Eastern Europe, including studies on the harmonization of legal principles and rules; the legal impact of the intertwining of domestic economies, on the one hand, with regional economies and the processes of international trade and investment on the other. The series offers a forum for discussion of topical questions of public and private law from domestic, regional, and international perspectives. Comparative research that provides insights in legal developments that can be communicated to those interested in questions, not only of law, but also of politics, economics, and of society of countries in the region also finds a home in the series.

For information about a related title, visit the webpages of the Brill journal Review of Central and East European Law.
Legal Remedies for the Protection of Cross-border Properties
The Polish dispute on an adequate approach towards the Białowieża Forest has been significantly internationalised, primarily by UNESCO and the European Union. The judgment of the CJEU has not settled the substance of the dispute, although it points to a violation of EU legal standards. The authors of The Disputed Białowieża Forest: Legal Remedies for the Protection of Cross-border Properties address the dispute in a constructive and interdisciplinary manner, rather than merely expressing concern towards in situ conservation, and derive universal legal remedies from it. They conclude that in the case of unique invaluable goods, adequate individual solutions should be applied in the form of a localised agreement, open to many entities (interested states, international organisations and even socially responsible private corporations), on the condition that organisational and financial co-responsibility are accepted.
This book places under scrutiny for the first time, whether and how, the United Nations Human Rights Council actually contributes to the protection of human rights in the face of pervasive gross violations world-wide. It finds that the Council does little of preventive protection, some mitigatory protection, and little remedial or compensatory protection. The Council’s response to situations of gross violations depends on the political alignments within its membership for each situation. The Council gives priority to cooperation and dialogue over principled denunciations of gross violations. It is not an organ of justice, but in some instances it is an organ for justice, inasmuch as it addresses the structural causes of violations. Much useful fact-finding takes place under the auspices of the Council, and it does contribute to the progressive development of international law.
A Computable Approach to Criminal Procedure Law
The volume presents an innovative analysis of defence rights in EU criminal proceedings through the lens of a computational approach to the law. This multi-level research tackles both EU law and national legislation, as well as case-law on defence rights in criminal proceedings.
The comparative analysis on procedural safeguards is integrated by legal informatics, that led to the translation into computable language of the relevant EU and national legislation.
Such multidisciplinary approach allows, through a semiautomated technology, to better highlight potentially uncovered deficit of the normative texts, and to enhance comparative analysis of legal systems.
The breakthrough perspective brings a novel viewpoint to the debate on criminal procedure rights, shading light on the potential emerging from the interaction between criminal law and technology.
Essays on Selected Case Studies about the Rights of Minorities
In this book, Bertus de Villiers offers unique insights into institutional design aimed at the protection of minority rights. He reflects on several case studies to highlight various aspects of the complexity of contemporary constitution drafting and how creative solutions have been found to secure the rights of minorities. The respective chapters drill down to a practical level to assist constitutional scholars, legal scientists, the judiciary and practitioners to better comprehend the dynamics of minority rights in the country under discussion; to be informed by the jurisprudence that have arisen; and to gain insights from the adjustments that had to be made to more effectively protect the rights of minorities.
In this book Siu Lang Carrillo Yap compares the land and forest rights of Amazonian indigenous peoples from Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Peru, and analyses these rights in the context of international law, property law theory, and forest and soil sciences. Within this scope and against the historical background, the recent interrelations between the Amazonian indigenous peoples’ land, forest and community forest management rights and their importance for the self-determination of indigenous peoples in the Amazonian region are examined.

Through bringing together international law with national law, natural resources law with property law and law with natural sciences, the author sheds new light on the complex topic of indigenous peoples’ rights closely entwined with the conservation of the Amazonian rainforest.
Launched in 1965, the Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide. This special issue of the Australian Year Book of International Law is a collection of essays providing commentary on how international law relates to the different dimensions of situations unfolding around us. Written during school shut-downs, campus closure, border restrictions, rising global infection rates and ongoing uncertainty as to what would happen next, they are also valuable reflections in a time of great crisis: fitting perhaps for a discipline famously critiqued by Hilary Charlesworth as one of crisis, rather than situated in the everyday. At root, this collection go some way in analysing and answering the question of how, exactly, COVID-19 will impact on international law more generally.
War crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and the crime of aggression (so-called ‘core crimes’) often could not be committed without financial assistance. This book examines the basis for individual criminal liability under international law for persons who finance core crimes. Despite the need for clear rules, neither international courts nor scholars agree upon whether or not, or under what circumstances, such liability exists.
To determine the minimum standard of liability, this work analyses the legal rules relating to complicity, both under international criminal law and domestically in twenty selected jurisdictions in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America and Oceania. The aim of these analyses is to determine whether there are general principles of law recognised by the community of States regarding the minimum standard of liability for aiders and abettors.
This book proposes a comparative framework for assessing legal rules relating to complicity, and it advances a normative claim as to how legal rules should be structured concerning the criminal responsibility of individuals who finance the commission of core crimes.
The analysis of the applicable international law and the comparative analysis of national jurisdictions lead to the conclusion that, currently, the minimum standard of knowledge for aiding and abetting is active knowledge. However, the author argues that this standard should be revised to include wilful blindness. Regarding the intent requirement, the analyses find that dolus eventualis is included in the definition of intent.