Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 455 items for :

  • Historical and Comparative Linguistics & Linguistic Typology x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Author:
Since the publication of the Septuagint in the 3rd century BCE, scholars have attempted to describe the types of stones that populate the biblical text. Modern academic scholars rely on ancient translations despite the contradictions and historical implausibility which manifests. Abandoning the ancient translations, this study synthesizes comparative linguistics with the archeogemological corpus. By ascertaining valid cognates, the Hebrew stone names may be equated with names in ancient languages which correspond with known species of stones. This allows us to confirm the identities of the stones mentioned in the biblical text and place them into historical context.
A Minority South Ryukyuan Language of the Miyako Islands
Spoken on Kurima, a miniscule island in the Miyakojima municipality in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, Kurima-Miyako is a South Ryukyuan topolect, a regional variant of the Miyako language. With most fluent speakers aged 80 or older and the island’s depopulation progressing, the topolect of Kurima faces imminent extinction, a reflection of a common pattern in the Ryukyus, whereupon the vernaculars of small islands and isolated remote areas have been facing multifold minorization for decades on the part of the dominant variety/varieties of the area (Shimoji and Hirara in the case of Kurima), Okinawan, and standard Japanese. Responding to the urgent task of producing a comprehensive description while it still has native speakers, the present volume is the first ever attempt at a systemic presentation of the Kurima topolect in any language. It also uses comparative evidence from Ryukyuan and Mainland Japonic languages to provide new proto-language reconstructions and offer insights into the history of Japonic languages.
The journal Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik includes studies on the older Germanic languages.

Please note that Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik is published as a Journal in print and online from 2016 (Volume 76) onwards. All back volumes are still available in print.
Die Reihe ist abgeschlossen.
Editor:
This new peer-reviewed book series focuses on the study of language contact, language use and language change in accordance with a view of language contact whereby both empirical data (the precise description of languages and how they are used) and the resulting theoretical elaborations (hence the statement and analysis of new problems) become the primary engines for advancing our understanding of the nature of language and the dynamics of language change. This involves linguistic, anthropological, sociological, historical, and cognitive factors, but also a potentially critical approach to the methods used for the study of the phenomena. Such an approach makes a major new contribution to the understanding of language change and the dynamics of language at a time when there is a notable increase in interest and activity in this field and where a continual reshaping of theoretical approaches is apparent. This implies particular attention to the epistemological frameworks that reshape the requirements for knowledge in this field. The series will publish monographs as well as edited volumes and conference proceedings centered around a coherent theme.

Editor-in-Chief:
This series deals specifically with contact languages, i.e. new languages that emerged out of contact between two or more ethnolinguistic groups, and includes pidgins, creoles, pidgincreoles, and mixed languages. It welcomes comprehensive grammatical descriptions and collections of grammatical sketches of hitherto undescribed or underdescribed varieties. Creoles and pidgins with both European and non-European lexifiers are of interest. In the case of mixed languages, it is desirable that the components from the different source languages are indicated graphically.

We encourage a unifying typological approach, so that these volumes are both accessible to typologists coming from different theoretical backgrounds and intelligible to the wider linguistic readership. Authors are expected to follow Leipzig glossing rules and IPA conventions. The editors may specify the TOC structure and the list of abbreviations; these will be discussed with authors at the book proposal stage.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editors will work with authors to ensure high standards. Interested scholars should contact the series editor Dr Peter Bakker. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Elisa Perotti.