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This book combines in-depth grammatical analysis with dialectology and typology. It presents important features of Jewish Neo-Aramaic from Dohok (Iraqi Kurdistan), a previously undocumented dialect that is now on the verge of extinction. The first Neo-Aramaic grammar to offer data glossing, this book is accessible for and highly relevant to Semitists, language typologists and historical linguists. It focuses especially on phonology, verbal morphosyntax and syntax. The monograph also highlights features that characterise the wider lišana deni dialect group, which is the most widespread Jewish Neo-Aramaic today. The book leverages the staggering microvariation persisting within North-Eastern Neo-Aramaic to reconstruct the grammaticalisation of some key Neo-Aramaic constructions. It also includes a text sample of prime historiographic value (Jews of Iraq during the Second World War).
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Haim Blanc’s Communal Dialects in Baghdad is one of the most influential works ever written on the on the linguistic diachrony of vernacular Arabic. Based on original fieldwork conducted during the years 1957–1962, this book portaits the extensive regional continuum of modern spoken Arabic stretching across parts of Mesopotamia and N. Syria, evinced by the Muslim, Jewish, and Christian speech communities in Baghdad.
Typos and other mistakes have been corrected in this reprint, which is accompanied by an Editorial Preamble by Alexander Borg and a Foreword by Paul Wexler, and contains references to the original page numbers.
A Minority South Ryukyuan Language of the Miyako Islands
Spoken on Kurima, a miniscule island in the Miyakojima municipality in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, Kurima-Miyako is a South Ryukyuan topolect, a regional variant of the Miyako language. With most fluent speakers aged 80 or older and the island’s depopulation progressing, the topolect of Kurima faces imminent extinction, a reflection of a common pattern in the Ryukyus, whereupon the vernaculars of small islands and isolated remote areas have been facing multifold minorization for decades on the part of the dominant variety/varieties of the area (Shimoji and Hirara in the case of Kurima), Okinawan, and standard Japanese. Responding to the urgent task of producing a comprehensive description while it still has native speakers, the present volume is the first ever attempt at a systemic presentation of the Kurima topolect in any language. It also uses comparative evidence from Ryukyuan and Mainland Japonic languages to provide new proto-language reconstructions and offer insights into the history of Japonic languages.
Brill’s Studies in Language, Cognition and Culture (BSLC) is a peer-reviewed book series that offers an international forum for high-quality original studies in languages and cultures. It focuses on the interaction between linguistic categories (and their conceptualization), cultural values, and human cognition. Publications will include interdisciplinary studies on language, its meanings and forms, and possible interactions with cognitive and communicational patterns. The series spans cultural and social anthropology, cognitive science and linguistics. The emphasis is on inductive based cross-linguistic and cross-cultural studies, with special attention to poorly known areas, such as Lowland Amazonia and the Pacific. In this series are also welcome culturally informed grammars which highlight the correlations and the interactions between languages and the societies in which they are spoken, with special focus on studies emanating from loci of linguistic diversity.
The single most important imperative of contemporary linguistics is to document, describe, and analyze endangered languages and other lesser-known languages and dialects. This open access, peer-reviewed series publishes titles on poorly studied languages and dialects around the world, and especially welcomes contributions on languages of Japan and the rest of the Asia-Pacific region. Single and multi-authored monographs discussing a single language or multiple languages are welcome, as well as thematic collections of contributions by various scholars. Authors not affiliated with the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics (NINJAL) or with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (UHM) are encouraged to apply for open access funding with their own institutions or with relevant private or governmental funding organizations. Information about open access publishing with Brill may be found here.

Interested scholars may contact the Acquisition Editor at Brill, Dr Uri Tadmor. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Elisa Perotti.
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The field of linguistics thrives on empirical data, whether from languages, from psycholinguistic experiments, from sociolinguistic interviews, from typological surveys, or from historical investigations, to name just a few sources of data. At the same time, the field also thrives on theory, inasmuch as general theories of language structure, language use, language acquisition, and language change are essential to a full understanding of how the object of our investigations, natural human language, works. Theories provide a basis for testable claims about language, claims that can be tested and confirmed or disproved only by empirical considerations.

Empirical Approaches to Linguistic Theory (EALT) aims to publish high-quality works that are grounded in empirical data but at the same time advance theoretical goals. The relevant notion of 'theory' envisioned here is broad and eclectic, but also rigorous. The contributing empirical data is similarly broadly defined. The series includes single or co-authored monographs on a single topic or linguistic issue, state-of-the art reports and/or thematically coherent multi-authored volumes.

Prospective authors are invited to submit proposals for this series, to be vetted by the series editors, in which the particular theoretical constructs and/or claims to be examined are identified along with the empirical basis for the investigation.
The development of the prosodic system from Indo-European to Balto-Slavic is dominated by two major innovations: the rise of mobility and the rise of acuteness. This book provides a new account of the latter. It stands out from previous works for being informed by recent advances in phonological typology and tonogenesis and, especially, for its comprehensiveness. All matters related to the rise of acuteness are treated in detail. As a result, the book includes new insights on several issues of Balto-Slavic historical phonology and morphology as well.
This peer-reviewed series publishes concise books in all areas of general and applied linguistics. The series welcomes manuscripts consisting of state-of-the-art overviews as well research monographs, long research articles. Both senior and junior scholars from anywhere in the world and working on any linguistic topic are welcome to submit their manuscripts.
Interested scholars may contact the Acquisition Editor at Brill, Dr Uri Tadmor. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Elisa Perotti.
Cerea, madamin, andoma bin? Less than a century ago, this was one of the most frequent greetings heard in Piedmont, a region in northwest Italy. Today, however, Piedmontese is severely endangered.
This volume presents the first widely accessible and comprehensive grammatical description of the contemporary koine, covering its phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics and typology, and drawing examples from both oral and written sources. Data on the history of the language and the local dialects and notes on revitalization efforts are also included.
Language revitalisation continues to gain importance as communities across the world seek to protect and revitalise languages under pressure from histories of colonisation, imperialism and globalisation. Language revitalisation practices and outcomes also provide researchers with new perspectives on language at many levels because of the deliberate and politicised engagement participants have in the process.

Language Revitalisation and Language Development explores a range of issues connected to language revitalisation from a community- and speaker-centred perspective with a particular focus on investigating relationships among a variety of social factors identified by language users, who are significant drivers of decision-making. This allows researchers to identify patterns of influence, decision-making, authority and aesthetics that on a daily basis lead to the re-emerging forms of revitalised languages. Books in this series also report on the analysis of language revitalisation data to address key questions within the field across areas such as sociolinguistics, language change, language contact, language variation, and acquisition.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editors will work with authors to ensure high standards.