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Volume Editors: Jens Scheiner and Isabel Toral
Baghdād: From its Beginnings to the 14th Century offers an exhaustive handbook that covers all possible themes connected to the history of this urban complex in Iraq, from its origins rooted in late antique Mesopotamia up to the aftermath of the Mongol invasion in 1258.
Against the common perception of a city founded 762 in a vacuum, which, after experiencing a heyday in a mythical “golden age” under the early ʿAbbāsids, entered since 900 a long period of decline that ended with a complete collapse by savage people from the East in 1258, the volume emphasizes the continuity of Baghdād’s urban life, and shows how it was marked by its destiny as caliphal seat and cultural hub.

Contributors
Mehmetcan Akpınar, Nuha Alshaar, Pavel Basharin, David Bennett, Michal Biran, Richard W. Bulliet, Kirill Dmitriev, Desmond Durkin-Meisterernst, Hend Gilli-Elewy, Beatrice Gruendler, Sebastian Günther, Olof Heilo, Damien Janos, Christopher Melchert, Michael Morony, Bernard O’Kane, Klaus Oschema, Letizia Osti, Parvaneh Pourshariati, Vanessa van Renterghem, Jens Scheiner, Angela Schottenhammer, Y. Zvi Stampfer, Johannes Thomann, Isabel Toral.
Construction Processes and Transmission of Knowledge from Late Antiquity to Early Islam
Volume Editor: Piero Gilento
This edited volume examines the construction processes and the mechanisms of transmission of knowledge between the eastern and western Mediterranean lands from the late Roman period to the early centuries of Islam. The essays explore issues of material culture, craft techniques, technological and typological changes and cultural contacts in Syria, Jordan, North Africa and Spain. The volume includes case studies on prestigious architectural complexes, defensive systems and other structures located in major urban centres (Cyrrhus, Bosra, Jerash, Sousse, Kairouan and Cordoba), as well as minor sites and rural buildings. It offers a fresh contribution to the long-lasting historiographic debate on the transition from antiquity to the Middle Ages and how Early Islamic architecture fostered the structural assumptions for new building experiences in many Mediterranean regions.

Contributors: Antonio Almagro, Shaker Al Shbib, Stefano Anastasio, Ignacio Arce, Jean-Claude Bessac, Pascale Clauss-Balty, Piero Gilento, Mattia Guidetti, Pedro Gurriarán Daza, Roberto Parenti, Pauline Piraud-Fournet, María de los Ángeles Utrero Agudo, Jean-Pierre van Staëvel, Apolline Vernet, François Villeneuve.
Studies in Visual Cultures and Artistic Transfers from Late Antiquity to the Modern Period
Mediterranean Art Histories (MAH) offers a platform in the emerging field of Mediterranean studies which enhances the dialogue between Byzantine, Islamic, Jewish and Western art history and archaeology. In contrast to the claim for a global art history based on comparative models, the study of the Mediterranean iconosphere is primarily concerned with the connectivity of cultures, seen in a permanent process of transformation. By focusing on networks and liquid spaces, the series understands the Mediterranean as a model and test case for trans-regional research, transcending geographical boundaries. Among the topics which could be addressed by MAH are multi-ethnic and multi-religious hubs; the migration of people and artifacts, the role of collecting, uses of spolia and attitudes towards the past; the construction of centers; the visual transmission and construction of knowledge. MAH is particularly interested in studies which investigate the historical dynamics of contact zones (harbor cities; shared and contested religious topographies etc.); all forms of artistic exchange and interaction within the Mediterranean as well as with other areas; the formation and transformation of aesthetic languages; the dynamics of ornaments and the concepts of images; the agency of artifacts in religious, political, social and economic contexts. The series wishes to include works which investigate the historical conceptualization of the Mediterranean space (for example in cartography) and of the distinction of nature and culture. And finally, MAH welcomes monographs and collective works which address methodological and historiographical concerns which could also regard the musealization of the Mediterranean. If you are working on a book that would be suitable for this series, please do not hesitate to contact BRILL Editor Teddi Dols (Dols@brill.com).

Editor: Alina Payne
The Land Between Two Seas: Art on the Move in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 1300-1700 focuses on the strong riverine ties that connect the seas of the Mediterranean system (from the Western Mediterranean through the Sea of Marmara, the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov) and their hinterland. Addressing the mediating role of the Balkans between East and West all the way to Poland and Lithuania, as well as this region’s contribution to the larger Mediterranean artistic and cultural melting pot, this innovative volume explores ideas, artworks and stories that moved through these territories linking the cultures of Central Asia with those of western Europe.
Author: Ulrich Marzolph
Mirzā ʿAli-Qoli Khoʾi is the unsurpassed master of the art of illustration in Persian lithographed books of the Qajar period, both in terms of quality and quantity of production. In the decade of documented activity, 1263–72/1846–55, the artist produced more than 2,300 single images in about 70 books, plus hundreds of minutely executed small images on the margins of several books and numerous illuminated chapter headings. Prepared by Ulrich Marzolph together with Roxana Zenhari, the present publication is a comprehensive assessment of the artist’s work and the first ever detailed discussion of an Iranian artist of the Qajar period. In addition, the book also serves as an introduction to Persian and Islamic art.
In An Archaeological, Sociological and Historical Study, volume 2 of The Oasis of Bukhara, Rocco Rante, Florian Schwarz and Luigi Tronca engage in a strong, pluridisciplinary collaboration and use an innovative approach to offer a new contribution to the history of the oasis of Bukhara from the end of the last millennium BCE to the end of the medieval era. Referencing archaeological, historical and sociological data, the book revisits the history of this Central Asian region, giving the reader, specialist and general reader a detailed description of the political and socio-economical features that characterized the oasis during this long chronological span.

The volume is co-published by Brill, Leiden, and the Louvre Museum, Paris.
A Reconstruction Based on the Safaitic Inscriptions
Author: Ahmad Al-Jallad
This book approaches the religion and rituals of the pre-Islamic Arabian nomads using the Safaitic inscriptions. Unlike Islamic-period literary sources, this material was produced by practitioners of traditional Arabian religion; the inscriptions are eyewitnesses to the religious life of Arabian nomads prior to the spread of Judaism and Christianity across Arabia. The author attempts to reconstruct this world using the original words of its inhabitants, interpreted through comparative philology, pre-Islamic and Islamic-period literary sources, and the archaeological context.
Author: Ulrich Marzolph
Mirzā ʿAli-Qoli Khoʾi is the unsurpassed master of the art of illustration in Persian lithographed books of the Qajar period, both in terms of quality and quantity of production. In the decade of documented activity, 1263–72/1846–55, the artist produced more than 2,300 single images in about 70 books, plus hundreds of minutely executed small images on the margins of several books and numerous illuminated chapter headings. Prepared by Ulrich Marzolph together with Roxana Zenhari, the present publication is a comprehensive assessment of the artist’s work and the first ever detailed discussion of an Iranian artist of the Qajar period. In addition, the book also serves as an introduction to Persian and Islamic art.
Author: Ulrich Marzolph
Mirzā ʿAli-Qoli Khoʾi is the unsurpassed master of the art of illustration in Persian lithographed books of the Qajar period, both in terms of quality and quantity of production. In the decade of documented activity, 1263–72/1846–55, the artist produced more than 2,300 single images in about 70 books, plus hundreds of minutely executed small images on the margins of several books and numerous illuminated chapter headings. Prepared by Ulrich Marzolph together with Roxana Zenhari, the present publication is a comprehensive assessment of the artist’s work and the first ever detailed discussion of an Iranian artist of the Qajar period. In addition, the book also serves as an introduction to Persian and Islamic art.
Muqarnas 38 begins by considering a curious Kufic-inscribed block in the eleventh-century church of Wuqro Cherqos in Ethiopia. Mikael Muehlbauer offers a biography of this object from its inception as an inscribed arch in a Fatimid great mosque to its medieval use as a chancel and luxury item. The next two articles focus on India, explaining the function of a fifteenth-century monument and manuscript, respectively. Mohit Manohar tackles issues of race in analyzing the Chand Minar, arguing that this stone minaret was built to commemorate the role of African and Indian officers in a key military victory. Vivek Gupta interprets the Miftāḥ al-Fużalāʾ, a unique illustrated Persian dictionary, as an object of instruction that utilized wonder as a didactic tool. Laura Parodi identifies and reconstructs three sixteenth-century royal gardens in Kabul, which influenced their counterparts in the Mughal metropoles of Hindustan as well as Safavid Iran.

The next three articles concern Ottoman Tunisia: Youssef Ben Ismail traces the rise of the fez in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, considering the commercial and cultural history of the red felt cap with a focus on Tunisian merchants. Sihem Lamine interprets the Zaytuna minaret in Tunis (built in 1892) as a colonial object that signaled a shift in power from the Ottomans to the French protectorate through its neo-Almohad style. Ridha Moumni’s article on Tunisian archaeological history (Part II) likewise critically examines a French colonial project, the Bardo Museum, and demonstrates that native Tunisians had already laid the groundwork for the museum through archaeological and collecting efforts earlier in the nineteenth century.

Twentieth-century photography is featured in the following two essays, the first of which (by Sabiha Göloğlu) dissects the relationship between photography and painting in analyzing Miʿmarzade Muhammed ʿAli’s (d. 1938) oil-on-canvas painting of Mecca and Medina. Jacobé Huet appraises Le Corbusier’s Le Voyage d’Orient, published in 1965 and based on a 1914 typescript of his earlier travel notes, showing how the author’s late edits transform his youthful approach to traditional Mediterranean architecture.

In the Notes and Sources section, Anaïs Leone presents new data for reconstructing the luster tilework decoration of the tomb chamber of ʿAbd al-Samad’s shrine in central Iran. The final essay, by Ignacio Ferrer Pérez-Blanco and Marie-Pierre Zufferey, is an exhaustive study of the five muqarnas capitals in the Alhambra. By sculpting these capitals and comparing them to the proportions of muqarnas profiles in seventeenth-century Spanish carpentry treatises, the authors advance a formal understanding of “Western” muqarnas capitals and establish geometrical relationships that have long been unclear.