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Volume 2: The Stratigraphy, Ceramics, and Other Finds
Horvat Omrit is a Roman period sanctuary complex in northern Israel with well-preserved temple architecture. This report presents artifacts recovered in the temenos excavations from 1999 to 2011. The volume begins with a discussion of the excavated stratigraphy, the major building phases, and the dates associated with them. Subsequent chapters examine Hellenistic and Roman ceramics, lamps, terracotta figurines, wall paintings and frescoes, coins from the Roman and medieval periods, a dedicatory pavement inscription, a 3rd-century BCE Aramaic inscription, faunal remains, jewellery, an 8th-century BCE cylinder seal, a marble sphinx, a stucco relief, and a small, inscribed altar. An appendix associates the catalogued artifacts with their stratigraphic locations. Altogether the artifacts contribute to the archaeology and history of a diverse Galilee.
Les 203 dédicaces votives en araméen de Palmyre de la période entre IIe et IIIe siècle de n.è. intriguent par 3 dénominations divines : « Béni (soit) son nom pour l’éternité », « Maître de l’Univers » et « le Miséricordieux ». Des études précédentes ont postulé univoquement l’anonymat divin. En étant déçu par cette explication du phénomène des inscriptions palmyréniennes, le livre Des dédicaces sans théonyme de Palmyre : Béni (soit) son nom pour l’éternité a pris pour le point de départ les concepts de remerciement et de louange, en découvrant l’existence d’un hymne rituel comme origine de la formule « Béni (soit) son nom pour l’éternité ». Qui sont donc des dieux, des récepteurs des dédicaces de Palmyre ? Peut-on combiner un nom propre d’un dieu avec ces trois formules ? Ce livre répond à ces questions flagrantes.

203 Palmyrene-Aramaic votive inscriptions from the period between the 2nd and 3rd centuries CE contain three intriguing designations of the gods: “Blessed (be) his name forever”, “Master of the Universe” and “the Merciful”. Previous studies have claimed that the god to whom these inscriptions are addressed is anonymous. Not satisfied with this explanation, Des dédicaces sans théonyme de Palmyre: Béni (soit) son nom pour l’éternité addresses the phenomenon through the lens of thanksgiving and praise, revealing the existence of a contemporary ritual hymn, the origin of the Palmyrene formula “Blessed his name forever”. Who, then, were these gods, the recipients of the dedications? Can we find a match between the formulae and a proper name? This book provides answers to these fascinating questions.
In this ground-breaking work on the Ottoman town of Manastir (Bitola), Robert Mihajlovski, provides a detailed account of the development of Islamic, Christian and Sephardic religious architecture and culture as it manifested in the town and precincts. Originally a town on the edge of the Via Egnatia, this small provincial town gradually developed into a significant administrative, military, religious, cultural and intellectual centre for the Balkans; a vibrant place, nurturing progressive multi-cultural and multi-confessional values with considerable influence on the formation of modern Balkan identities.

The present work is the culmination of thirty years of research using primary source material from archives and chronicles and the monuments themselves for the purpose of both preserving and extending the boundaries of current knowledge. It offers a comprehensive biography of a great cultural knot in the Balkans and offers a rich source for further use by scholars, students and non-technical readership alike.
[Mamluk Palaces and Houses in Cairo: An Archaeological and Civilizational Study]
Author: Ghazwan Yaghi
Mamluk Palaces and Houses in Cairo studies the types of extant residential buildings in Cairo from the Mamluk era (1250-1517 C.E.) and the factors affecting their design, architectural and decorative elements, and building materials. It provides an archaeological, architectural, historical, and documentary study of all the surviving palaces and houses, focussing on the structural and architectural status of its various parts. The author also discusses its present-day restoration and rehabilitation projects.
In this book, Ghazwan Yaghi presents a variety of empirical material that sheds more light on the social and economic history of the Mamluk era, as well as a glossary of archaeological and documentary terminology that could serve as a tool for further research in Islamic architecture.

القصور والبيوت المملوكية في القاهرة يدرس أنواع المباني السكنية الموجودة في القاهرة من العصر المملوكي (0521-7151 م) والعوامل المؤثرة في تصميمها، وعناصرها المعمارية والزخرفية، ومواد بناءها، إضافة لتقديم دراسة أثرية ومعمارية وتاريخية ووثائقية لكل القصور والبيوت الباقية، مع التركيز على الحالة الإنشائية والمعمارية لكافة أجزاءها، وملقية الضوء على مشاريع ترميمها وإعادة تأهيلها حتى الوقت الحالي.
في هذا الكتاب، يقدم غزوان ياغي مادة ثرية تساهم في زيادة فهمنا للتاريخ الاجتماعي والاقتصادي للعصر المملوكي، كما يوفر مسرد المصطلحات الأثرية والوثائقية مادة علمية تزيد من فهمنا للعمارة السكنية الإسلامية التي يأتي المنتج المعماري فيها معبراً بصورة دقيقة عن أصحابه سواء منهم من أمر به أو من قام بتنفيذه.
A Socio-Political History of Architecture
Author: R.D. McChesney
In Central Asia, Muslim shrines have served as community centers for centuries, particularly the large urban shrines that seem, in many cases, to have served as the inspiration as well for a city’s architectural development. In Four Central Asian Shrines: A Socio-Political History of Architecture R. D. McChesney documents the histories of four such long-standing shrines—Gur-i Mir at Samarqand, Khwajah Abu Nasr Parsa Mazar at Balkh, the Noble Rawzah at Mazar-i Sharif, and the Khirqat al-Nabi at Qandahar. In all four cases the creation and evolution of the architecture of these shrines is traced through narratives about their social and political histories and in the past century and a half, through the photographic record.
Intercultural Engagements with Architecture and Craft in the Age of Travel and Reform
Author: Mercedes Volait
The commodification of Islamic antiques intensified in the late Ottoman Empire, an age of domestic reform and increased European interference following the Tanzimat (reorganisation) of 1839. Mercedes Volait examines the social life of typical objects moving from Cairo and Damascus to Paris, London, and beyond, uncovers the range of agencies and subjectivities involved in the trade of architectural salvage and historic handicraft, and traces impacts on private interiors, through creative reuse and Revival design, in Egypt, Europe and America. By devoting attention to both local and global engagements with Middle Eastern tangible heritage, the present volume invites to look anew at Orientalism in art and interior design, the canon of Islamic architecture and the translocation of historic works of art.
Author: Moshe Sharon
Western Palestine is extremely rich in Arabic inscriptions, whose dates range from as early as CE 150 until modern times. Most of the inscriptions date from the Islamic period, for under Islam the country gained particular religious and strategic importance, even though it made up only part of the larger province of Syria.
This historical importance is clearly reflected in the hundreds of inscriptions, the texts of which cover a variety of topics: construction, dedication, religious endowments, epitaphs, Qur'anic texts, prayers and invocations, all now assembled in the Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum Palaestinae ( CIAP).
The CIAP follows the method established at the end of the 19th century by Max van Berchem, namely, the studying of the Arabic inscriptions 'in context'. Van Berchem managed to publish two volumes of the inscriptions from Jerusalem: the CIAP covers the entire country. The inscriptions are arranged according to site, and are studied in their respective topographical, historical and cultural context. In this way the CIAP offers more than a survey of inscriptions: it represents the epigraphical angle of the geographical history of the Holy Land.
Volume One: (A) was published in 1997, Volume Two: (B-C) in 1999, Volume Three: (D-F) in 2004, Volume Four: (G) in 2008, an Addendum in 2007, Volume Five: (H-I) in 2013, Volume Six: J (1) in 2016 and Volume Seven: J (2) Jerusalem 1 in 2021. All volumes are still available.
Dedicated to Erica Cruikshank Dodd, Art and Material Culture in the Byzantine and Islamic Worlds offers new perspectives on the Christian and Muslim communities of the east Mediterranean from medieval to contemporary times. The contributors examine how people from diverse religious backgrounds adapted to their changing political landscapes and show that artistic patronage, consumption, and practices are interwoven with constructed narratives. The essays consider material and textual evidence for painted media, architecture, and the creative process in Byzantium, Crusader-era polities, the Ottoman empire, and the modern Middle East, thus demonstrating the importance of the past in understanding the present.

Contributors: Evanthia Baboula, Lesley Jessop, Anthony Cutler, Jaroslav Folda, John Osborne, Glenn Peers, Annemarie Weyl Carr, Mat Immerzeel, Bas Snelders, Angela Andersen, May Farhat, Marcus Milwright, Rico Franses.
Cultural Negotiations and Artistic Translations in the Middle Ages and 19th-century Historicism
Volume Editor: Francine Giese
Mudejarismo and Moorish Revival in Europe examines key aspects related to the reception of Ibero-Islamic architecture in medieval Iberia and 19th-century Europe. It challenges prevalent readings of architecture and interiors whose creation was the result of cultural encounters. As Mudéjar and neo-Moorish architecture are closely connected to the Islamic world, concepts of identity, nationalism, religious and ethnic belonging, as well as Orientalism and Islamoscepticism significantly shaped the way in which they have been perceived over time. This volume offers art historical and socio-cultural analysis of selected case studies from Spain to Russia and opens the door to a better understanding of interconnected cultural and artistic phenomena.
Contributors are (in order of appearance) Francine Giese, Ariane Varela Braga, Michael A. Conrad, Katrin Kaufmann, Sarah Keller, Elena Paulino Montero, Luis Araus Ballesteros, Ekaterina Savinova, Christian Schweizer, Alejandro Jiménez Hernández and Laura Álvarez Acosta.