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Restauration, Sacrifice, et Naissance prophétique dans la Sīra d’Ibn Isḥāq
Author:
This book aims to demonstrate that the accounts that feature Muhammad's grandfather in Ibn Ishaq's Sīra are the product of narrative engineering. Through a narrative sequence, in which Abd al-Muttalib is the hero, several intriguing episodes follow one another in a causal manner and lead to the birth of a future prophet. Articulated with a historical anthropology, the narrative analysis reveals that the Sīra is the heir to the royal literature of the Ancient Near East. Using motifs and themes from the culture of the Fertile Crescent, the Sīra makes 'Abd al-Muttalib a royal figure in the service of legitimising the Abbasid dynasty, heir par excellence to Ishmael and restorer of the Abrahamic covenant.

Cet ouvrage entend démontrer que les récits qui mettent en scène le grand-père de Muhammad dans la Sīra d'Ibn Ishaq sont le produit d'une ingénierie narrative. À travers une séquence narrative, dont Abd al-Muttalib est le héros, plusieurs épisodes intriguant s'enchainent d'une manière causale et aboutissent à la naissance d'un futur prophète. Articulée à une anthropologie historique, l'analyse narrative révèle que la Sīra est l'héritière de la littérature royale du Proche Orient Ancien. À partir de motifs et de thématiques issues de la culture du croissant fertile, la Sīra fait de 'Abd al-Muttalib une figure royale au service de la légitimation de la dynastie abbasside, héritier par excellence d'Ismaël et restaurateur de l'alliance abrahamique.
Dialogues for the Future provides a sneak peek at the long philosophic journey of the renowned Arab scholar Taha Abderrahmane. The author looks at different thorny issues such as traditions, philosophy, ethics, globalization, and logic through a local prism that is not directedly tainted by the Western epistemic and ontological worldview. While seemingly addressing audiences with a background in the philosophy of language and Islamic philosophy, Taha’s intellectual project tackles many questions that wider readerships might have about the Muslims’ and Arabs’ contribution to knowledge in the past and present. The translator’s introduction “on Dialogue, Ethics and Traditions” contextualizes Taha’s book within the plethora of his academic work, allowing English-speaking readers to engage with the open canvas of dialogue Taha has resiliently initiated.
This is the first in a series of sourcebooks charting the reception of Avicenna (Ibn Sīnā, d.1037) in the Islamic East (from Syria to central Asia) in the 12th-13th centuries CE. Avicenna was the dominant philosophical authority in this period, who provoked generations of thinkers to subtle critique, defense, and development of his ideas. The series will translate and analyze hundreds of passages from works by such figures as al-Ghazālī, al-Suhrawardī, Fakhr al-Dīn al-Rāzī, Naṣīr al-Dīn al-Ṭūsī, and many more. This volume focuses especially on issues in metaphysics, dealing with topics like the essence-existence distinction, the problem of universals, free will and determinism, Platonic Forms, good and evil, proofs of God’s existence, and the relationship between philosophy and theology.
Texts and Studies in Honor of William C. Chittick and Sachiko Murata
Volume Editor:
Islamic Thought and the Art of Translation honors two of the most beloved and productive scholars in the field of Islamic Studies, Professors William Chittick and Sachiko Murata. For the past five decades, in over 40 books (monographs, editions, translations, edited volumes) and more than 300 articles, Professors Chittick and Murata have presented us with philologically sound and analytically rigorous expositions of the pre-modern Islamic intellectual tradition, particularly in the areas of Sufism and philosophy. They have done so primarily by zeroing in on the technical vocabularies of Arabic, Persian, and Chinese texts in these disciplines, demonstrating just how important careful reading and responsible translation methods are to the study of pre-modern worldviews.

Contributors: Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Masoud Ariankhoo, Mohammed Rustom, Kazuyo Murata, Ali Karjoo-Ravary, Shankar Nair, Maria Massi Dakake, Gregory Vandamme, Alireza Pharaa, Justin Cancelliere, Matthew Melvin-Koushki, Marlene DuBois, Naser Dumairieh, Omar Edaibat, Oludamini Ogunnaike, Khalil Andani, Davlat Dadikhuda, Rosabel Ansari, Muhammad U. Faruque, Sayeh Meisami, Cyrus Ali Zargar, Alireza Asghari, Amer Latif, Mukhtar H. Ali, Laury Silvers, Mohammed Mehdi Ali, Tahera Qutbuddin, Yousef Casewit, and Atif Khalil.
Le florilège de l’invocation d’après Ḫālid b. Yazīd (IIIe/IXe siècle)
Volume Editors: and
In Supplier Dieu dans l’Égypte toulounide, Mathieu Tillier and Naïm Vanthieghem provide the edition, translation and study of a booklet preserved on papyrus and dated 267/880-881. It offers a selection of some forty hadiths heard by Khālid ibn Yazīd, a minor local scholar, concerning the invocations that every pious Muslim has to use when addressing God. Composed during the reign of the famous governor Aḥmad ibn Ṭūlūn, the first autonomous ruler of Islamic Egypt, this manuscript bears exceptional testimony to the way traditional sciences were taught at the time. Not only does it open an unprecedented window on the milieu of ordinary transmitters, whose names soon fell into oblivion, but it also sheds new light on the Tulunids’ religious policy and on the islamisation of Egypt.

Dans la seconde moitié du IIIe/IXe siècle, un savant répondant au nom de Ḫālid b. Yazīd enseigna une quarantaine de hadiths sur le thème des invocations que tout pieux musulman se devait d’adresser à Dieu. Un opuscule issu de son enseignement, portant la date de 267/880–881, a survécu sur papyrus. Mathieu Tillier et Naïm Vanthieghem en proposent ici l’édition, la traduction et l’étude. Composé sous le règne du fameux gouverneur Aḥmad b. Ṭūlūn, premier souverain autonome de l’Égypte islamique, ce manuscrit offre un témoignage exceptionnel sur la manière dont les sciences traditionnelles étaient alors enseignées. Il ouvre non seulement une fenêtre inédite sur le milieu des transmetteurs ordinaires, dont les noms tombèrent rapidement dans l’oubli, mais vient aussi éclairer d’un nouveau jour la politique religieuse des Toulounides et la dynamique d’islamisation de l’Égypte.
The Hadhrami Arabs in the Netherlands East Indies and Indonesia (1900-1950)
Author:
In In Search of Identity: The Hadhrami Arabs in the Netherlands East Indies and Indonesia (1900-1950) Huub de Jonge discusses changes in social, economic, cultural and national identity of Arabs originating from Hadhramaut (Yemen) in the Netherlands East Indies and Indonesia. Within the relatively isolated and traditionally oriented Hadhrami community, all sorts of rifts and divisions arose under the influence of segregating colonial policies, the rise of Indonesian nationalism, the Japanese occupation, and the colonial war. The internal turmoil, hardly noticed by the outside world, led to the flourishing of new ideas, orientations, loyalties and ambitions, while traditional values, customs, and beliefs were called into question.
Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī’s (d. 1101/1690) Theology of Sufism
Author:
In Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism, Naser Dumairieh argues that, as a result of changing global conditions facilitating the movement of scholars and texts, the seventeenth-century Ḥijāz was one of the most important intellectual centers of the Islamic world, acting as a hub between its different parts.
Positioning Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī (d. 1101/1690) as representative of the intellectual activities of the pre-Wahhabism Ḥijāz, Dumairieh argues that his coherent philosophical system represents a synthesis of several major post-classical traditions of Islamic thought, namely kalām and Akbarian appropriations of Avicennian metaphysics. Al-Kūrānī’s work is the culmination of the philosophized Akbarian tradition; with his reconciliation of Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas with Ashʿarī theology, Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas became Islamic theology.
Volume Editors: and
Philosophical Theology in Islam studies the later history of the Ashʿarī school of theology through in-depth probings of its thought, sources, scholarly networks and contexts. Starting with a review of al-Ghazālī’s role in the emergence of post-Avicennan philosophical theology, the book offers a series of case studies on hitherto unstudied texts by the towering thinker Fakhr al-Dīn al-Rāzī as well as specific philosophical and theological topics treated in his works. Studies furthermore shed light on the transmission and reception of later Ashʿarī doctrines in periods and regions that have so far received little scholarly attention. This book is the first exploration of the later Ashʿarī tradition across the medieval and early-modern period through a trans-regional perspective.

Contributors: Peter Adamson, Asad Q. Ahmed, Fedor Benevich, Xavier Casassas Canals, Jon Hoover, Bilal Ibrahim, Andreas Lammer, Reza Pourjavady, Harith Ramli, Ulrich Rudolph, Meryem Sebti, Delfina Serrano-Ruano, Ayman Shihadeh, Aaron Spevack, and Jan Thiele.
Volume Editors: and
In Frantz Fanon and Emancipatory Social Theory: A View from the Wretched, Dustin J. Byrd and Seyed Javad Miri bring together a collection of essays by a variety of scholars who explore the lasting influence of Frantz Fanon, psychiatrist, revolutionary, and social theorist. Fanon’s work not only gave voice to the “wretched” in the Algerian War of Independence (1954-1962), but also shaped the radical resistance to colonialism, empire, and racism throughout much of the world. His seminal works, such as Black Skin, White Masks, and The Wretched of the Earth, were read by The Black Panther Party in the United States, anti-imperialists in Africa and Asia, and anti-monarchist revolutionaries in the Middle East. Today, many revolutionaries and scholars have returned to Fanon’s work, as it continues to shed light on the nature of colonial domination, racism, and class oppression.

Contributors include: Syed Farid Alatas, Rose Brewer, Dustin J. Byrd, Sean Chabot, Richard Curtis, Nigel C. Gibson, Ali Harfouch, Timothy Kerswell, Seyed Javad Miri, Mumia Abu-Jamal, Pramod K. Nayar, Elena Flores Ruíz, Majid Sharifi, Mohamed Imran Mohamed Taib and Esmaeil Zeiny.
Light upon Light: Essays in Islamic Thought and History in Honor of Gerhard Bowering brings together studies that explore the richness of Islamic intellectual life in the pre-modern period. Leading scholars around the world present nineteen studies that explore diverse areas of Islamic Studies, in honor of a renowned scholar and teacher: Professor Dr. Gerhard Bowering (Yale University). The volume includes contributions in four main areas: (1) Quran and Early Islam; (2) Sufism, Shiʿism, and Esotericism; (3) Philosophy; (4) Literature and Culture. These areas reflect the enormous breadth of Professor Bowering’s contributions to the field over a lifetime of scholarship, teaching, and mentoring.

Contributors: Hussein Ali Abdulsater, Mushegh Asatryan, Shahzad Bashir, Jonathan Brockopp, Yousef Casewit, Jamal Elias, Janis Esots, Li Guo, Matthew Ingalls, Tariq Jaffer, Mareike Koertner, Joseph Lumbard, Matthew Melvin-Koushki, Mahan Mirza, Bilal Orfali, Gabriel Reynolds, Nada Saab, Amina Steinfels & Alexander Treiger.