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Islamic and Jewish Studies around the Turn of the Twentieth Century
The scholarship of Ignaz Goldziher (1850–1921), one of the founders of Islamic studies in Europe, has not ceased to be in the focus of interest since his death. This volume addresses aspects of Goldziher’s intellectual trajectory together with the history of Islamic and Jewish studies as reflected in the letters exchanged between Goldziher and his peers from various countries that are preserved in the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and elsewhere. The thirteen contributions deal with hitherto unexplored aspects of the correspondence addressing issues that are crucial to our understanding of the formative period of these disciplines.

Contributors: Camilla Adang, Hans-Jürgen Becker, Kinga Dévényi, Sebastian Günther, Máté Hidvégi Livnat Holtzman, Amit Levy, Miriam Ovadia, Dóra Pataricza, Christoph Rauch, Valentina Sagaria Rossi, Sabine Schmidtke, Jan Thiele, Samuel Thrope, Tamás Turán, Maxim Yosefi, Dora Zsom.
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This groundbreaking work studies the Arabic literary culture of early modern Southeast Asia on the basis of largely unstudied and unknown manuscripts. It offers new perspectives on intellectual interactions between the Middle East and Southeast Asia, the development of Islam and especially Sufism in the region, the relationship between the Arabic and Malay literary traditions, and the manuscript culture of the Indian Ocean world. It brings to light a large number of hitherto unknown texts produced at or for the courts of Southeast Asia, and examines the role of royal patronage in supporting Arabic literary production in Southeast Asia.
A West African Jihadist’s Perspectives on Bori, Religious Deviance, and Race and Enslavement in Ottoman Tunisia. With Translation and Critical Annotation
While in the Ottoman Regency of Tunis after returning from pilgrimage around 1809 C.E., the Timbuktu cleric and religious puritanist, Aḥmad b. al-Qādī b. Yūsuf b. Ibrāhīm al-Fulānī al-Timbuktāwī wrote Hatk al-Sitr ʿammā ʿalayhi sūdān Tūnis min al-kufr (Piercing the Veil: Being an Account of the Infidel Religion of the Blacks of Tunis), which he dedicated to the ruler of the Beylic, Ḥammūda Pāsha (r. 1782-1814 C.E.)
In this treatise, al-Timbuktāwī provided a vivid account of the Hausa Bori cult and entreated Tunisian authorities to imprison or even re-enslave its practitioners whom he distinguished from the heterogeneous Black population in the Regency.
This critical edition and complete translation of Hatk al-Sitr places the story of al-Timbuktāwī’s encounter with the Bori practitioners not just in their Maghribi and Sudanic African contexts, but also in the environment of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Jihad and Islamic revivalism. The result is an insight into a discourse on Bori, jihad, and race and enslavement in the context of the African Diaspora to the Islamic World.
An Early Qurʾānic Codex on Papyrus (P. Hamb. Arab. 68)
In the eighth century CE, the Christian theologian John Damascene referred to a Book of the Cow among the sacred texts of the Muslims. P. Hamb. Arab. 68 not only represents so far the earliest known Qurʾānic manuscript preserved on papyrus, but also bears witness to an independent circulation of the Sūra of The Cow in late seventh- or early eighth-century Egypt. Significant deviations from the commonly accepted text of the Qurʾān suggest that this copy was rapidly discarded. The present volume offers a complete edition as well as a thorough philological and historical study of the manuscript.
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In Exercising Authority and Representing Rule, András Barati examines twenty-two hitherto unpublished Persian royal decrees issued by various rulers of eighteenth-century Iran and Afghanistan kept at the Āstān-i Quds-i Rażawī in Mashhad. Considering the paucity of primary sources from this period due to relatively frequent political turmoils, he aims to improve this situation by offering the transcription and translation of these original documents as well as a commentary concerning the textual elements, external aspects, and content of the decrees. Making use of previously published documents, András Barati presents the first substantial study on post-Safavid eighteenth-century diplomatics and addresses several issues related to the political, economic, and administrative history of the region in the early modern period.
تعُد الأسدية منطلقا لمدوّنة سحنون في الفقه المالكي. وينسب فهرس مكتبة رقاّدة بالقيروان ثلاث قطع مخطوطة إلى الأسدية. فحصنا هذه القطع من ناحية المنهج، فشككنا في صحةّ تلك النسبة ، ثم حققناها، فتبين أنها لم تكن من الأسدية. فهي تمثلّ رواية أسد بن الفرات لكتاب الأصل عن محمدّ بن الحسن الشيباني، وتهمّ الفقه الحنفي . <\br> هذه القطع هي فريدة من نوعها، وهي تتجاوز في قيمتها الأسدية ذاتها. ولتحقيق هذه القطع، قمنا بمقارنتها بالنصّ المنشور لكتاب الأصل الذي اعتمد فيه المحقّق على مخطوطات متأخّرة، بخلاف مخطوطات القيروان التي تعود إلى القرن 3هـ/9م، كما قارنّاها بكتاب الكافي في الفقه للحاكم الشهيد وكتاب المبسوط للسرخسي، وكذلك بمدوّنة سحنون.<\br>

The Asadiyya is considered to be the foundation of Saḥnūn's Mudawwana, one of the most important works of the Malikī school of jurisprudence. The catalog of the Raqqada Library in Kairouan attributes three manuscript fragments to the Asadiyya. This work examines these fragments from a methodological point of view, since the validity of that attribution is questionable. From the edition by Nejmeddine Hentati, it becomes clear that they do not belong to the Asadiyya. These are rather witnesses of the scholarly transmissions of Asad b. al-Furāt from Muḥammad b. al-Ḥasan al-Shaybānī, and they contain Ḥanafī jurisprudence.
These fragments are unique, and their importance stretches beyond the Asadiyya. For the edition, Hentati relied on al-Ḥākim al-Shahīd's compendium in al-Kāfī fī l-fiqh, as well as on al-Sarakhsī al-Mabsūṭ, which is a commentary on this compendium. Hentati also compared these fragments to Saḥnūn's Mudawwana.
Critical edition of the Arabic version, French Translation and English Introduction
Editor:
Associate Editors: and
Averroes’ Middle Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics reveals the original version, previously considered lost, of a landmark work in Arabic philosophy. Undoubtedly authored by the Cordovan thinker Averroes (1126-1198), this “middle” commentary is distinct from the Long Commentary and the Short Commentary in method, several doctrinal elements, and scope (it includes books M and N of the Stagirite’s treatise). These points and the transmission of the Middle Commentary at the crossroads of Arabic, Hebrew, and Latin traditions are addressed in the introduction, which also establishes that the work was extensively quoted by the mystical philosopher Ibn Sabʿīn (13th c.). The edition of the text and the facing translation follow. At the end of the book are Ibn Sabʿīn’s quotations, along with extensive indexes.