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Iran and the Caucasus Monographs is a double-anonymous peer-reviewed book series that covers recent findings in Irano-Indian, Caucasian, Near-Eastern, Armenian, and Turkic studies. The focus will be on linguistics and philology, history, archaeology, anthropology, history of religions, art history, as well as ethnopolitical and security issues concerning the said regions. The Series includes short monographs presenting original research, revised high-quality theses, commissioned edited volumes, festschrifts, opera minora of prominent scholars, and scholarly translations with commentaries and appropriate apparatus. The predominant language of the volumes in the Series is English, but German and French submissions are welcome too.
A Critical Edition of a Seventeenth-century Volga-Turkī Source
Editor / Translator:
The Book of the Činggis Legend is a product of the steppe’s oral historiography, referring to events from the 13th−17th centuries, and presents the collective historical consciousness of the nomadic peoples of the Volga region's Turco-Tatar world.
The stories offer abundant information on the society, way of thinking and morals of the nomads, one of them can even be regarded as a kind of nomad “mirror of princes”. The other ones incorporate such crucial events in the Volga region as the islamization of nomad clans, epidemic, famine, the appearance of Halley’s Comet, the uprising of the Bashkirs, etc.
This book includes the first critical text edition of the source, the first full translation into English along with a glossary, historical comments, a huge apparatus and the three most complete facsimiles of the manuscript.
Byzantium is more and more recognized as a vibrant culture in dialogue with neighbouring regions, political entities, and peoples. Where better to look for this kind of dynamism than in the interactions between the Byzantines and the Armenians? Warfare and diplomacy are only one part of that story. The more enduring part consists of contact and mutual influence brokered by individuals who were conversant in both cultures and languages. The articles in this volume feature fresh work by younger and established scholars that illustrate the varieties of interaction in the fields of literature, material culture, and religion.
Contributors are: Gert Boersema, Emilio Bonfiglio, Bernard Coulie, Karen Hamada, Robin Meyer, Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Claudia Rapp, Mark Roosien, Werner Seibt, Emmanuel Van Elverdinghe, Theo Maarten van Lint, Alexandra-Kyriaki Wassiliou-Seibt, and David Zakarian.
Was plurilingualism the exception or the norm in traditional Eurasian scholarship? This volume presents a selection of primary sources—in many cases translated into English for the first time—with introductions that provide fascinating historical materials for challenging notions of the ways in which traditional Eurasian scholars dealt with plurilingualism and monolingualism. Comparative in approach, global in scope, and historical in orientation, it engages with the growing discussion of plurilingualism and focuses on fundamental scholarly practices in various premodern and early modern societies—Chinese, Indian, Mesopotamian, Jewish, Islamic, Ancient Greek, and Roman—asking how these were conceived by the agents themselves. The volume will be an indispensable resource for courses on these subjects and on the history of scholarship and reflection on language throughout the world.
Qarakhanid Roads to China reconsiders the diplomacy, trade and geography of transcontinental networks between Central Asia and China from the 10th to the 12th centuries and challenges the concept of “the Silk Road crisis” in the period between the fall of the Tang Dynasty and the rise of the Mongols. Utilizing a broad range of Islamic and Chinese primary sources together with archaeological data, Dilnoza Duturaeva demonstrates the complexity of interaction along the Silk Roads and beyond that, revolutionizes our understanding of the Qarakhanid world and Song-era China’s relations with neighboring regions.
Invasions, Conquest, and Government of a Frontier Region in Thirteenth-Century Eurasia (1204-1295)
The work focuses on the Mongol conquest and domination of Caucasia in the 13th century, from the Sea of Azov in the north to present-day Georgia and Armenia.
While sedentary civilizations and nomadic cultures had a long history of interaction in this region, the Mongol conquest made it into a frontier in which Medieval Europe and Asia became more intensely integrated and interconnected. The Mongols made Caucasia into a coherent power based on both European and Asian experiences and traditions. The genesis of this deeply transformational process constitutes the central theme of this book.
Construction et déconstruction de l’idée d’empire tartare en France du XVIe siècle à la fin du XVIIIe siècle
De Tamerlan à Gengis Khan describes how the writing of the history of Tamerlane by French scholars between the 16th and 18th c. led to a reinterpretation of the history of Genghis Khan. Based on a supposed common origin of these two emperors, the idea of a «Tartar empire» structured the perception of the history of the Orient until the 19th century. Matthieu Chochoy highlights the dynamics and networks within which this idea circulated, the sources mainly produced in Persia and China that fed this paradigm and the stages of its deconstruction.
In this perspective, this book stands at the crossroads of the history of scholarship in France in the classical age and the intellectual history of Orientalism.

De Tamerlan à Gengis Khan décrit la façon dont l’écriture de l’histoire de Tamerlan par les érudits français entre le xvie et le xviiie siècle a conduit à une réinterprétation de l’histoire de Gengis Khan. Construite à partir d’une origine supposément commune à ces deux empereurs, l’idée «d’empire tartare» a structuré la perception de l’histoire de l’Orient jusqu’au xixe siècle. Matthieu Chochoy met en lumière les dynamiques et les réseaux au sein desquels cette idée a circulé, les sources majoritairement produites en Perse et en Chine qui ont alimenté ce paradigme, et les étapes de sa déconstruction.
Dans cette perspective, ce livre témoigne de la rencontre entre une histoire de l’érudition en France à l’âge classique et une histoire intellectuelle de l’orientalisme.
In this groundbreaking book, Andrey Makarychev approaches populism through a critical biopolitical lens and shows that populist narratives are grounded intrinsically in corporeality, sexuality, health, bodily life and religious practices. The author demonstrates that populism is a phenomenon deeply rooted in mass culture. He compares three countries -- Estonia, Ukraine and Russia--that all share post-Soviet experiences offering a broad spectrum of populist discourses. The three case studies display the interconnection between biopower and populism through references to culture, media, art, theatrical performances and literature, raising new questions and directions for understanding traditional accounts of populism.

This work was supported by European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 822682: "Populist rebellion against modernity in 21st-century Eastern Europe: neo-traditionalism and neo-feudalism – POPREBEL".
A Portrait of a Local Intermediary in Russian Central Asia
Author:
In The Qїrghїz Baatïr and the Russian Empire Tetsu Akiyama gives a vivid description of the dynamism and dilemmas of empire-building in nomadic Central Asia from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century, through reconstructing the biography of Shabdan Jantay uulu (ca. 1839–1912), a chieftain from the northern Qїrghїz (Kirghiz, Kyrgyz) tribes. Based on the comprehensive study of primary sources stored in the archives of Central Asian countries and Russia, Akiyama explores Shabdan’s intermediary role in the Russian Empire’s military advance and rule in southern Semirech’e and its surrounding regions. Beyond the commonly held stereotype as a “faithful collaborator” to Russia, he appears here as a flexible and tough leader who strategically faced and dealt with Russian dominance.