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Legal Remedies for the Protection of Cross-border Properties
The Polish dispute on an adequate approach towards the Białowieża Forest has been significantly internationalised, primarily by UNESCO and the European Union. The judgment of the CJEU has not settled the substance of the dispute, although it points to a violation of EU legal standards. The authors of The Disputed Białowieża Forest: Legal Remedies for the Protection of Cross-border Properties address the dispute in a constructive and interdisciplinary manner, rather than merely expressing concern towards in situ conservation, and derive universal legal remedies from it. They conclude that in the case of unique invaluable goods, adequate individual solutions should be applied in the form of a localised agreement, open to many entities (interested states, international organisations and even socially responsible private corporations), on the condition that organisational and financial co-responsibility are accepted.
Author: Katrin Buchmann
Buchmann analyses the work of UK, German, Danish and Swedish embassies in the USA and China on climate change in the late 2000s and early 2010s. She relates which coalitions and narratives embassies sought to develop to convince China and the United States that a more progressive climate policy was possible, to achieve gains supporting an agreement under the UNFCCC. This book shows that a key interpretation of climate diplomacy was selling/trade: Europe selling technology “solutions” to solve climate change. In this narrative, Europe has already done what needs to be done and outsourcing of production to China e.g. is ignored. In the USA, embassies entered coalitions with states, faith groups and the military, arguing that a more progressive climate policy was mandated by either God or security concerns. State politicians, including Democrats, often actually didn’t implement any climate policies. Any gains were reversed through climate denial lobbying funded by corporations. Embassies did not address this.
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) requirements are quasi-universal. Praised as the core of the international legal response to ensure environmental protection, this procedure is an information tool for better public decision-making, which can contribute to empowering individuals and civic groups. Based on the historical background of the relevant norms and on case studies, Interstitial Law-Making in International Law: A Study of Environmental Impact Assessments verifies whether the role of procedure in secreting substantive law may be fulfilled in the distinctive legal system of public international law, while appraising how EIA requirements have been conceived and implemented as regards encouraging all international actors to behave in an environmentally conscious way, in a world of heterogeneous political regimes.
The Yearbook of Polar Law covers a wide variety of law and policy topics relating to the Arctic and the Antarctic, and even the Third Pole. Many of the articles draw on presentations made at the annual Symposiums on Polar Law. The Editors-in-Chief are Gudmundur Alfredsson of the Stefansson Arctic Institute in Akureyri and the China University of Political Science and Law in Beijing, Julia Jabour of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Timo Koivurova of the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, and Akiho Shibata of the Polar Cooperation Research Centre, Kobe University.

Articles published in the Yearbook are peer reviewed, unless otherwise noted. The Yearbook will also carry book reviews and occasional news stories.

The topics covered in the Yearbook include:
- human rights issues, such as autonomy, self-government and self-determination, the rights of indigenous peoples to land and natural resources, cultural rights and cultural heritage, and indigenous traditional knowledge
- local, national and corporate governance issues
- environmental law, climate change, security and human rights implications of climate change, protected areas and species, and biodiversity
- regulatory and management agreements and arrangements for marine environments, marine mammals, fisheries conservation and other biological/mineral/oil resources
- jurisdictional and other issues re the exploration, exploitation and shipping of oil, gas and minerals
- law of the sea, the retreating sea ice, and continental shelf claims
- trade law, potential shipping lines through the northwest and northeast passages, maritime law and transportation law
- territorial claims and border disputes on both land and at sea
- peace and security, and dispute settlement
- the roles and actual involvement of international organizations in the polar regions, such as the Arctic Council, the Nordic Council, the International Whaling Commission, the European Union, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and the United Nations, and
- the activities of NGOs, think tanks and academic institutions

The papers in this volume are principally based on presentations at the Polar Law Symposium, held online with logistical support by the Kobe University Polar Cooperation Research Centre (PCRC), in November 2020.
Editor: David Freestone
This series publishes work on all aspects of the international legal dimensions of the concept of sustainable development. Its aim is to publish important works of scholarship on a range of relevant issues including conservation of natural resources, climate change, biodiversity loss and the role of international agreements, international organizations and state practice.

The 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity prominently enshrined the concept of “access and benefit-sharing” (ABS) in the sphere of public international law. The series offers a forum for original research on the concept of ABS and on innovative regulatory and governance approaches related to the equitable sharing of commercial and non-commercial benefits deriving from access to genetic resources, biological resources and the traditional knowledge of indigenous and local communities, as well as in broader context of environmental protection and management.

The series will promote scholarly analysis of and practitioners’ reflection on the theory and the practice of regulatory and governance approaches to access and benefit-sharing.

It will explore substantive issues including: the multi-level legal frameworks for access to and benefit-sharing from genetic resources and traditional knowledge; legal issues related to access and benefit-sharing in the context of nature conservation; the legal recognition and reward of sustainable customary use and community-based environmental management practices; the protection and promotion of traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples, smallholder farmers and local communities; legal challenges and innovations related to private sector-led, community-led and development assistance-based ABS arrangements; national and international approaches to the enforcement of the law. The series will also aim to illuminate the interactions between different areas of international law, between national and international law, as well as between the customary law and practices of indigenous and local communities and national and international law on ABS. It will also investigate interactions or influences between benefit-sharing approaches in various areas of international law, including human rights, the law of the sea, climate change and in particular REDD, forest management, agriculture, innovation and intellectual property rights, and corporate accountability.

The series will include both international (public and private) law studies as well as national/comparative/transnational law studies on innovative ways to foster access and benefit-sharing arrangements between governments, between government and local or indigenous communities, as well as between private individuals or entities. While the main focus is on legal studies, there is also some scope for inter-disciplinary pieces in both streams of research, as long as they are specifically aimed to inform legal analysis and lawmaking.

Books published in the series will be peer-reviewed and include research monographs and edited collections of essays.

The Yearbook is also available online. To learn more about the online version, please click here.

The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives.

Volume One features a thematic section on the Draft Articles of the ILC on the “Protection of Persons in the Event of Disasters” as well as a general selection of articles, and an international and regional review of International Disaster Law in Practice, plus book reviews and bibliography.

The Yearbook is also available online. To learn more about the online version, please click here.
Author: Agnes Chong
International Law for Freshwater Protection traces the development of international water law on fresh water protection and demonstrates how the regime focuses on the utilisation and rights of sovereign states over the protection and sustainable growth of shared water resources. The evolving jurisprudence influenced by environmental law highlights the regime’s insufficient focus on the environmental protection of watercourses. This book argues that existing rules, mechanisms and norms within international law can address the regime’s imbalance and establish how these might be applied to improve freshwater protection.
The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives. In the Thematic Section of Volume 3, entitled ‘Health and International Disaster Law’ distinguished scholars debate legal and institutional implications of the Covid-19 pandemic and health emergencies in relation to several emerging or neglected topics.
The Legal Regulation of Environmental Crime - The International and European Dimension provides a comprehensive analysis of the international and EU legal regimes for tackling environmental crime. The book includes an in-depth analysis of the major international conventions as they relate to the regulation of environmental crime (CITES, Basel, MARPOL) and provides a holistic overview of the evolution and content of EU law in the field of environmental crime, covering substantive criminal law harmonisation, judicial cooperation and the role of EU criminal justice bodies and agencies (Europol, Eurojust and the EPPO) in fighting environmental crime. Further, the book addresses key recent policy and legislative developments in the field and offers a timely contribution to legal reform in view of the publication of new proposals on legislation on environmental crime at EU level.