Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 298 items for :

  • Comparative Social Sciences x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
Clear All
Volume Editors: Greg Albo, Stephen Maher, and Alan Zuege
It is often remarked that critical – and especially Marxist – state theory began to lose its central place in the study of comparative politics in the 1980s. Ironically, this shift occurred just as neoliberal policies were transforming the social form and spatial scales of the state, radically restructuring the practices of state economic intervention, and extending the capabilities of the coercive arms of the state. This volume addresses the ‘impoverishment of state theory’ over the last decades and insists on the continued salience of class analysis to the study of states. The book’s title, State Transformations, reflects several central themes in the comparative study of states: the neoliberal restructuring of capitalist states, the changing economic and political architecture of imperialism, and the prospects of a democratic transformation of capitalist states. The essays collected here on these themes are in honor and memory of Leo Panitch, whose influential body of work has shaped debates on the state, imperialism, and socialism over the past four decades.

Contributors are: Clyde W. Barrow, Caio Bugiato, Frank Deppe, Ruth Felder, Ana Garcia, Sam Gindin, Doug Henwood, Martijn Konings, Colin Leys, Sebnem Oguz, Bryan D. Palmer, Dennis Pilon, Larry Savage, Charles Smith, Michalis Spourdalakis and Hilary Wainwright
Author: Eric Blanc
This groundbreaking study rediscovers the socialists of Tsarist Russia’s imperial borderlands, upending conventional interpretations of working-class politics, the Russian Revolution, and Second International socialism. Based on archival research in eight languages, Revolutionary Social Democracy is the first comparative account of the numerous socialist parties that fought for democracy and workers’ power across the entire span of the Russian Empire, from the factories of Warsaw, to the oil fields of Baku, to the autonomous parliament of Finland. By demonstrating that the Russian Revolution was far less Russian than commonly assumed, Eric Blanc challenges long-held assumptions of historians, sociologists, and activists about the dynamics of revolutionary change under autocratic and democratic conditions.
Series Editor: Otmar Weiss
International Studies in Sport and Society is a peer-reviewed book series that investigates the relationship between sport and society. In today’s modern world, with its ethnically and culturally diverse populations, the role of sport as a vehicle for cultural dialogue is of particular interest. Due to the growing importance of sport, the exploration of its sociocultural, sociopolitical, and socioeconomic functions is becoming an increasingly essential task for the sociology of sport. In this context, a new scientific orientation has evolved, accompanied by new perspectives for research activities concerning the development of sport over time and its differentiation across different societies. The cooperation between international scholars in the framework of the series has an identity-forming potential for the sociology of sport. The scientists involved in the series, consisting not only of sport sociologists but also experts from the neighbor disciplines of general sociology, psychology, anthropology, and economy, contribute to building international networks in the forefront of the sociology of sport, so that both the circulation of knowledge and future research collaborations become possible. Against this background, International Studies in Sport and Society aims to illustrate sport sociological topics, theories, and research findings to readers around the world.

International Studies in Sport and Society has value primarily for researchers, educators, and students active in sociology and various adjacent fields concerned with sport, to include but not limited to education, governance, and the natural sciences, as well as for representatives of sport organizations, policy makers, and sport industry professionals.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Jennifer Obdam.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
Author: Bernard Scott
Bernard Scott has met a long-felt need by authoring a book that shows the relevance of cybernetics for the social sciences (including psychology, sociology, and anthropology). Scott provides user-friendly descriptions of the core concepts of cybernetics, with examples of how they can be used in the social sciences. He explains how cybernetics functions as a transdiscipline that unifies other disciplines and a metadiscipline that provides insights about how other disciplines function. He provides an account of how cybernetics emerged as a distinct field, following interdisciplinary meetings in the 1940s, convened to explore feedback and circular causality in biological and social systems. He also recounts how encountering cybernetics transformed his thinking and his understanding of life in general.
A Study of Its Social Systems, Dimensions, Forms and Indicators
Milan Zafirovski identifies and investigates the resurgence of capitalist dictatorship in contemporary society, especially after 2016. This book introduces the concept of capitalist dictatorship to the academic audience for the first time. It examines the capitalist dictatorship as a total social system composed of specific systems such as a coercive economy, repressive polity, illiberal civil society and irrational culture in contrast to liberal democracy. It also investigates multiple dimensions, forms and indicators of capitalist dictatorship, and calculates degrees of capitalist dictatorship for contemporary Western and comparable societies such as OECD countries. Capitalist dictatorship, including autocracy, Zafirovski argues, is the gravest threat to contemporary democratic society post-2016.
Editor: Björn Wittrock
The International Institute of Sociology (IIS) is a scholarly forum for furthering professional interests through the exchange of ideas and open discussion without any ideological constraints. The main activity of the IIS is the organization of international meetings of limited scope, designed as intellectual exchanges focusing on plenary sessions as well as on working sessions proposed and organized by members at large. The Institute was established in 1893, and as such is the oldest continuous sociological association in existence.

The Annals of the International Institute of Sociology started in 1895, under the editorship of René Worms, Secretary General of the IIS. Volumes are supposed to come out once every year and they contain the proceedings of the previous congress. Publication is restricted to papers presented in the Plenary Sessions and in those Working Sessions which are either strictly connected with the congress theme or of particular interest to the social setting of the congress.

The Annals cover a multidisciplinary approach to social analysis, in concurrence with the nature of the membership of IIS that is not restricted to sociologists but also includes historians, economists, demographers, anthropologists, and social psychologists.
Editors: Loek Halman and Paul de Graaf
The European Values Studies book series is based on the results of a large-scale, cross-national, and longitudinal survey research program, founded in the late 1970s by a foundation which is now called the European Values Study. This group investigates basic social, cultural, political, moral, and religious values held by the populations of the European countries. The first study was carried out in 1981, followed by repeat surveys in 1990, 1999, and 2008, in an increasing number of countries. Today, all European countries are involved in the European Values Study. The publications in this series include interpretations and explanations of the quantitative survey data. These are presented in the form of monographs and edited volumes. The Series also publishes sourcebooks.

For more information on the European Values Study see: www.europeanvaluesstudy.eu.

The series has published one volume over the last 5 years.
In Biomedical Hegemony and Democracy in South Africa Ngambouk Vitalis Pemunta and Tabi Chama-James Tabenyang unpack the contentious South African government’s post-apartheid policy framework of the ‘‘return to tradition policy’’. The conjuncture between deep sociopolitical crises, witchcraft, the ravaging HIV/AIDS pandemic and the government’s initial reluctance to adopt antiretroviral therapy turned away desperate HIV/AIDS patients to traditional healers.

Drawing on historical sources, policy documents and ethnographic interviews, Pemunta and Tabenyang convincingly demonstrate that despite biomedical hegemony, patients and members of their therapy-seeking group often shuttle between modern and traditional medicine, thereby making both systems of healthcare complementary rather than alternatives. They draw the attention of policy-makers to the need to be aware of ‘‘subaltern health narratives’’ in designing health policy.
Historicizing Mobility, Labor and Confinement
Responding to the deteriorating situation of migrants today and the complex assemblages of the geographies they navigate, Coercive Geographies examines historical and contemporary forms of coercion and constraint exercised by a wide range of actors in diverse settings. It links the question of spatial confines to that of labor. This fraught nexus of mobility and work seems self-evidently relevant to explore. Coercive Geographies is our attempt to bring together space, precarity, labor coercion and mobility in an analytical lens. Precarity emerges in particular geographical and historical contexts, which are decisive for how it is shaped. The book analyzes coercive geographies as localized and spatialized intersections between labor regulations and migration policies, which become detrimental to existing mobility frameworks.

Contributors include: Irina Aguiari, Abdulkadir Osman Farah, Leandros Fischer, Konstantinos Floros, Johan Heinsen, Martin Bak Jørgensen, Martin Ottovay Jørgensen, Apostolos Kapsalis, Karin Krifors, Sven Van Melkebeke, Susi Meret, and Vasileios Spyridon Vlassis.
Volume Editors: Vincenzo Cicchelli and Sylvie Mesure
This reference book provides the reader with an exhaustive array of epistemological, theoretical, and empirical explorations related to the field of cosmopolitanism studies. It considers the cosmopolitan perspective rather as a relevant approach to the understanding of some major issues related to globalization than as a subfield of global studies. In this unique contribution to conceptualizing, establishing, experiencing, and challenging cosmopolitanism, each chapter seizes the paradoxical dialectic of opening up and closing up, of enlightenment and counter-enlightenment, of hope and despair at work in the global world, while the volume as a whole insists on the moral, intellectual, structural, and historical resources that still make cosmopolitanism a real possibility — and not just wishful thinking — even in these hard times.

Contributors include: John Agnew, Daniele Archibugi, Paul Bagguley, Esperança Bielsa, Estevão Bosco, Stéphane Chauvier, Daniel Chernilo, Vincenzo Cicchelli, VittorioCotesta, Stéphane Dufoix, David Held, Robert Holton, Yasmin Hussain, David Inglis, Lauren Langman, Pietro Maffettone, Sylvie Mesure, Magdalena Nowicka, Sylvie Octobre, Delphine Pagès-El Karaoui, Massimo Pendenza, Alain Policar, Frédéric Ramel, Laurence Roulleau-Berger, Hiro Saito, Camille Schmoll, Bryan S. Turner, Clive Walker, and Daniel J. Whelan.

With an Afterword by Arjun Appadurai.