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This volume explores issues and themes related to violence against women. It is distinctive in two ways. First, the editors have convened an international cohort of contributing scholars, whose assessment of the pervasiveness and urgency of the problems and their proposals for solutions derives from their pneumatology: their theology of the Holy Spirit. Second, this book represents quite simply the first sustained effort to bring together in one volume Pentecostal voices from a variety of academic disciplines, ecclesial traditions, and cultural situations to address the urgent issues associated with violence toward women.
Editor / Translator: Julia Schwartzmann
Writing in the late 19th century, Mózes Salamon, rabbi of a small Hungarian community, hoped to convince his fellow rabbis to recognize women as equally privileged members of the People Israel. The result was his The Path of Moses: A Scholarly Essay on the Case of Women in Religious Faith, a ground-breaking enquiry into the causes of women’s exclusion from most of Judaism’s religious practices. Predating contemporary feminism, it gave early expression to ideas found in today’s religious feminist critique of women’s role in Judaism, thus undermining attempts to dismiss those ideas as shallowly mimicking fashionable secular opinion. The Path of Moses is here published for the first time in English, accompanied by the Hebrew original, an introduction, and commentary.
This series brings together contributions addressing the question of the unity versus conflict, closeness versus alienation, and convergence versus divergence entrenched in the infinite variety of collective identities illustrated by Jews in this era. The titles included investigate—each volume under its own angle—the principles, narratives, visions and commands which constitute in different places the essentials of Jewishness. As a rule, they ask whether or not one is still allowed to speak, at the beginning of this new century, of one—single and singular—Jewish People. Hence, this series is a podium for researchers of Judaism and the Jewish condition all over the world—from Israel to the United States, and from there to Argentina and Brazil as well as Russia, Ukraine or France, England and Germany. These investigations should yield an understanding of how far Judaism is still one while Jewishness is multifarious. The perspectives offered may draw from sociology and the social sciences as well as from history and the humanities in general. This series aspires to constitute a meeting point for them all. It will be of interest not only to scholars in Jewish Studies but also to anyone interested in the theory and practice of major phenomena of our time like transnational diasporas, the globalization of ethnicity, and present-day relations of religiosity and laicity which, in one way or another, are akin to the preoccupations of researchers in the field of Jewish identities.

The series published an average of four volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion is an interdisciplinary, international, peer-viewed, annual series, which publishes new and innovative research within the social scientific study of religion or belief. Contributions span a range of theoretical orientations, geographic contexts and research methods, though most articles are reports of original quantitative or qualitative research related mainly to the sociology and/or psychology of religion.

Volumes in the series usually include a guest-edited special section that allows networks of researchers to report studies in areas that are of current interest or which are innovative and expanding the discipline into new areas.

Submitting Proposals: We welcome proposals from academics at all levels of their career, including early career researchers and final year PhD students. Please submit a title and abstract of no more than 300 words together with names and short biographies (150 words), institutional affiliation/s (if relevant), and contact details.
Manuscripts for both the main and special sections should be sent to the editors, Ralph Hood (ralph-hood@utc.edu) & Sariya Cheruvallil-Contractor (ac0967@coventry.ac.uk). For more information and submission guidelines please see the Call for Papers under Downloads on this webpage, or contact the editors.

The series has published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Editors: Michael Lackner and Zhao Lu
This is the first comprehensive book that presents the manifold aspects of divination and prognostication in traditional and modern China, from the early period of oracle bones to present-day fortune-tellers. It introduces what is out there in the field of Chinese divination and prognostication, and how we can further explore it especially through different disciplines. Eminent specialists outline the classifications of divination, recently excavated texts, the relationship between practitioners and clients, the place of the “occult” arts in cosmology, literature and religion, and the bureaucratic system.
Contributors are: Constance Cook, Richard J. Smith, Marc Kalinowski, Stephen R. Bokenkamp, Lü Lingfeng, Liao Hsien-huei, Philip Clart, Fabrizio Pregadio, Esther-Maria Guggenmos, Andrew Schonebaum, and Stéphanie Homola.
Author: Sam Mickey
New Materialism and Theology reflects on questions of human embodiment, nonhuman agency, technological innovation, and what really matters now and in possible futures. Bringing theological inquiry together with the philosophical movement of new materialism, Sam Mickey points toward a variety of ways for thinking about matter and everything that materializes in human and more-than-human worlds. Mickey provides introductory definitions and historical context for understanding the relationship between various theological and materialist ideas and practices. He examines the self-declared novelty and materiality of new materialism, noting the limitations of those labels while articulating the very new and quite material challenges that new materialism does indeed pose, challenges of urgent existential importance that demand theological responses. New Materialism and Theology faces the theological implications and material possibilities facing humanity while ecological and technological realities seem to be pointing toward posthuman or transhuman futures or perhaps something else entirely.
Is there a “return to the religious” in post-Communist Eastern Europe that differs from religious trends in the West and the Middle East? Looking beyond immediate events, this book situates public talk about religion and religious practice in the longue durée of the two entangled pasts —Byzantine and Ottoman—that implicitly underpin contemporary politics. Islam, Christianity, and Secularism situates Bulgaria in its wider region, indicating ongoing Middle Eastern, Russian, and other European influences shaping patterns of religious identity. The chapters point to overlapping and complementary views of ethno-religious belonging and communal practices among Orthodox Christians and Muslims throughout the region. Contributors are Dale F. Eickelman, Simeon Evstatiev, Kristen Ghodsee, Galina Evstatieva, Ilia Iliev, Daniela Kalkandjieva, Plamen Makariev, Momchil Metodiev, Daria Oreshina, Ivan Zabaev and Angeliki Ziaka.