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The 14th thematic volume of International Development Policy provides perspectives through case studies from the global Souths focusing on the challenges and opportunities of governing migration on the subnational, national, regional and international levels. Bringing together some thirty authors from Africa, Latin America and Asia, the book explores existing and new policies and frameworks in terms of their successes and best practices, and looks at them through the lens of additional challenges, such as those brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the rise of nationalisms and an increase in xenophobia. The chapters also take the ‘5 Ps’ approach to sustainable development (people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnerships) and assess how migration policies serve sustainable development in a rapidly evolving context.
International Studies in Maritime Sociology disseminates peer-reviewed research on maritime topics including but not limited to maritime labor, the culture of maritime spaces, marine environmental issues and society, the sociology of the use of marine resources (e.g., fisheries and extractive industries), maritime migration routes, maritime policies, and marine and maritime tourism. The volumes in the International Studies in Maritime Sociology series assemble perspectives from various social science disciplines on the aforementioned topics in order to facilitate an interdisciplinary understanding of the relationship between the sea and society.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.

Maritime spaces are socially constructed by humans and refer to seas and islands, coasts, port cities and villages, as well as ships and other human-made marine structures. Social interaction with marine environments and living beings, e.g. in a symbolic, cultural or economic manner, has led to the emergence of spatial structures which affect the knowledge, beliefs, meanings and obstinately patterns. Those structures shape mutual expectations of human beings and form the perception, imagination, or memory of inhabitants of maritime spaces. They enable or restrict human action, construct people’s everyday life, their norms and values, and are changeable.

Contributors include: Jan Asmussen, Robert Bartłomiejski, Benjamin Bowles, Isabel Duarte, Eduardo Sarmento Ferreira, Rita Grácio, Marie C. Grasmeier, Karolina Izdebska, Seung Kuk Kim, Arkadiusz Kołodziej, Agnieszka Kołodziej-Durnaś, Maciej Kowalewski, Urszula Kozłowska, Ulrike Kronfeld-Goharani, Rute Muchacho, Giacomo Orsini, Włodzimierz Karol Pessel, Célia Quico, Harini Sivalingam, Joana Sousa, Frank Sowa, Nuno Cintra Torres, and Günter Warsewa.
China's Social Media under Xi Jinping
Author: Titus C. Chen
Why has China’s authoritarian government under Xi Jinping retained popular support without political reforms? Drawing on Chinese social media data, in this book Titus C. Chen argues that China’s digital propaganda and information control techniques--the monopolistic exercise of market authoritarianism--have empowered the Xi administration to manipulate public discourse and shape public opinion via social media. Chen argues that these techniques forge a sense of community and unite the general public under the Chinese government, thereby legitimating autocratic rule. By enhancing our understanding of China’s digital ideological statecraft, the book makes a major contribution to the fields of China Studies and Political Communication.
In Lost-Time Injury Rates Rodrigo Finkelstein examines the information-intensive operations of recording and processing work-related accidents, diseases and fatalities carried out by Workers’ Compensation Systems. Situated within the field of political economy of information, this critique contributes to the understanding of how injury rates service a specific sector of the economy by constructing lost labour power for sale.
The central argument of this critique can be stated as follows: grounded in the capitalist mode of production, injury rates constitute a historical social relation that, by taking the semblance of inductive indicators, conceal specific capitalist relations that bring about the exchange and distribution of lost labour power among capitalists and wage labourers.
The series Homo Technologicus, Social and Ethical Futures, explores philosophical, social, and ethical issues generated by scientific research and innovations able to modify humanity, and alter our self-understanding as humans. Philosophy and ethics should be cognizant of, and involved with, advances in biology, medicine, neuroscience, computing, and engineering, and their combinations in transformative technologies. Current and future generations of scholars, citizens, and policy-makers deserve well-informed assessments of the capabilities and limitations of new technosciences, and their potential effects on individuals, public health and welfare, and social institutions. Homo Technologicus, the technological species, must be central to our personal, moral, civic, legal, and political futures.
A Shared Responsibility
We are poised at a crossroads between a past that is outgrown and a future we must choose. This book examines the multiple ways that wisdom, grounded in life experience, science and theoretical knowledge, can contribute to positive and sustainable local and global futures. The authors in this book have brought their thinking to various aspects of this existential challenge using the lenses of Wisdom and Wise Practice, in an effort to explore ideas by which society might make choices in planning and acting for a wiser future.

Wisdom practices have developed over millennia to assist people in approaching and managing life experiences and difficulties. While such practices were originally considered the purview of academic and religious scholars; at this important time in history, it must become everyone’s responsibility to wisely look ahead if we are to achieve a sustainable future for society.

The authors of this book comprise international future-oriented leaders, scholars, practitioners, community members and commentators with a commitment to social justice, human service and development. The book explores the place of wisdom and wise living practices alongside other ways of knowing and acting, for shaping positive futures for people and the world we inhabit. The chapters examine major challenges across political, physical and social life worlds, aiming to promote a quantum shift in discourse and decision making to address current and future challenges.

The four parts of the book follow forward thinking ideas of wise professional practice:
• Facing future challenges,
• Exploring practice pathways,
• Examining options and
• Future possibilities.
The Spatial Practices series is premised on the observation that places are inscribed with cultural meaning, not least of all in terms of collective constructions of identity. Such space-based constructions can manifest in material and immaterial, explicit and implicit forms of heritage, and they are crucial factors in the promotion of a group’s wellbeing. It is this intersection of spaces, heritage and wellbeing that the present volume takes at its object. It considers ways in which institutional spaces in their materiality as well as in their cultural inscriptions impact on the wellbeing of the subjects inhabiting them and explores how heritage comes to bear on these interrelations within specific institutions, such as prisons, hospitals or graveyards.
Local Practices in Indonesia and Nigeria
Gender, age, class, ethnicity, religion, and political ideologies all matter in peacebuilding. Adopting a feminist approach, the 13th volume of International Development Policy analyses such intersecting differences in local contexts to develop a better understanding of how intersectionally gendered dynamics shape and are shaped by peacebuilding. In this volume, findings are presented from a six-year collaborative research project that, involving scholars from Indonesia, Nigeria, and Switzerland, investigated peacebuilding initiatives in Indonesia and Nigeria. The authors identify a number of logics that highlight how gender is deployed strategically or asserts itself inadvertently through gender stereotypes, gendered divisions of labour, or identity constructions.

Contributors include: Mimidoo Achakpa, Ceren Bulduk, Rahel Kunz, Henri Myrttinen, Joy Onyesoh, Elisabeth Prügl, Arifah Rahmawati, Christelle Rigual and Wening Udasmoro.
This collection sheds light on diverse forms of collective engagement among young people. Recent developments in youth studies, and the changing global shape of socio-economic conditions for young people, demand new approaches and ideas. Contributors focus on novel processes, practices and routines within youth collectivity in various contexts across the globe, including Indonesia, Spain, Italy, Norway and Poland. The chapters pay particular attention to transitional phases in the lives of young people. Conceptually, the book also explores the strengths and limitations of a focus on collectivity in youth studies. Ultimately, the book makes the case for a focus on forms of collectivity and engagement to help scholars think through contemporary experiences of shared social life among young people.

Contributors are: Duncan Adam, Massimiliano Andretta, Roberta Bracciale, David Cairns, Diego Carbajo Padilla, Enzo Colombo, Valentina Cuzzocrea, Carles Feixa, Ben Gook, Izabela Grabowska, Natalia Juchniewicz, Ewa Krzaklewska, Wolfgang Lehmann, Michelle Mansfield, María Martinez, Ann Nilsen, Rebecca Raby, Paola Rebughini, Birgit Reißig, Bjørn Schiermer, Tabea Schlimbach, Melanie Simms, Benjamín Tejerina, Kristoffer C Vogt, and Natalia Waechter.