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A great number of historical examples show how desperate people sought to obtain a glimpse of the future or explain certain incidents retrospectively through signs that had occurred in advance. In that sense, signs are always considered a portent of future events. In different societies, and at different times, the written or unwritten rules regarding their interpretation varied, although there was perhaps a common understanding of these processes.
This present volume collates essays from specialists in the field of prognostication in the European Middle Ages.
Contributors are Klaus Herbers, Wolfram Brandes, Zhao Lu, Rolf Scheuermann, Thomas Krümpel, Bernardo Bertholin Kerr, Gaelle Bosseman, Julia Eva Wannenmacher (†), Matthias Kaup, Vincent Gossaert, Jürgen Gebhardt, Matthias Gebauer, Richard Landes.
Konturierungen eines umstrittenen Themas
Volume Editor: Winfried Löffler
Ein aktueller Überblick zur Ideen- und Missbrauchsgeschichte eines schillernden Schlagworts, aber auch zu seinen Potenzialen als philosophisches Analysewerkzeug.
Die Wortgeschichte von „Weltanschauung“ ist kurz: Zwischen seinem ersten, eher beiläufigen Auftauchen bei Kant 1790, subjektivierenden Aufladungen in der Romantik und den inflationären Ideologisierungen und Politisierungen von „Weltanschauung“ im späten 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert liegen nur 150 Jahre. Besonders sein Missbrauch durch NS-Ideologen hat das Wort in Verruf gebracht, es lebt aber u.a. im juristischen Sprachgebrauch fort und erlebt in der gegenwärtigen Religionskritik wieder etwas Konjunktur: Dort wird z.T. wieder eine naturalistische „wissenschaftliche Weltanschauung“ in Aussicht gestellt. Als philosophisches Analysewerkzeug hat das Wort aber Potenzial: „Weltanschauung“ könnte nicht nur für religiös-politische Bewertungen stehen, sondern auch für jenes implizite theoretische Koordinatensystem, das jeden Menschen in seinem Verstehen, Denken und Handeln leitet.
How Frameworks of Communication, Care, Politics and Power Reveal and Conceal Equine Selves
Human-horse relationships take the central place in this edited collection examining the horse’s perspective by asking: How are human-equine relationships communicated, enacted, understood, encouraged, and restricted? The contributors apply varied disciplinary methods as they emphasize comprehending horses not solely in terms of their functional uses, but also as impactful participants in relationships, whether more—or less—equally. By exploring the “who” of horses, The Relational Horse offers a better understanding of horses’ lived experiences and interests within the worlds they share with humans, and a way forward for human-equine studies that more equitably represents the horse in those shared worlds.
This essay presents Gould’s distinctive system for analyzing kin terminologies showing the system’s power, importance, and usefulness—and showing its relationship to other approaches and the payoffs each aims at. In revealing significant new empirical regularities and simplifications, Gould’s analytic system implies important constraints on future analytic and interpretative approaches to kin terminologies. Some of these new insights involve the demonstration of the effect of distributed collective cognitive systems over and above the effects of repeated iterations of individual cognitive constraints or pressures. It is the peculiar nature of the kinterm domain that allows these findings to be so directly shown, but the implication is that these findings apply more generally to the collective cognitive systems that make up language and culture.
Ein philosophischer Versuch
Was ist Liebe? Dieses Buch will mit analytischem Handwerkszeug die Frage nach dem Wesen der Liebe beantworten. Dabei soll weder ihre Vielgestaltigkeit aus dem Blick geraten noch soll das Phänomen mit der definitorischen Schere zurechtgestutzt werden.
In insgesamt zehn Kapiteln werden sowohl die Grenzen klassischer Versuche aufgezeigt, die Liebe zu verstehen, wie auch ein neues Modell der Liebe entwickelt. Auf der Grundlage einer allgemeinen Theorie, derzufolge nur durch Emotionen für uns etwas bedeutsam ist, wird der emotionale Charakter der Liebe in den Vordergrund gestellt. Bei dem Versuch, das spezifische emotionale Phänomen der Liebe zu bestimmen, zeigt sich: Liebe gibt es auf drei Ebenen – als Liebesanfall, als Emotionsmuster und als Meta-Emotion.
Editor: Samer Akkach
Naẓar, literally ‘vision’, is a unique Arabic-Islamic term/concept that offers an analytical framework for exploring the ways in which Islamic visual culture and aesthetic sensibility have been shaped by common conceptual tools and moral parameters. It intertwines the act of ‘seeing’ with the act of ‘reflecting’, thereby bringing the visual and cognitive functions into a complex relationship. Within the folds of this multifaceted relationship lies an entangled web of religious ideas, moral values, aesthetic preferences, scientific precepts, and socio-cultural understandings that underlie the intricacy of one’s personal belief. Peering through the lens of naẓar, the studies presented in this volume unravel aspects of these entanglements to provide new understandings of how vision, belief, and perception shape the rich Islamic visual culture.

Contributors: Samer Akkach, James Bennett, Sushma Griffin, Stephen Hirtenstein, Virginia Hooker, Sakina Nomanbhoy, Shaha Parpia, Ellen Philpott-Teo, Wendy M.K. Shaw.
Karel Kosík (1926–2003) was one of the most remarkable Czech Marxist philosophers of the twentieth century. His reputation as a creative thinker is owed largely to his philosophical ‘blockbuster’ Dialectics of the Concrete, first published in Czechoslovakia in 1963. In reintroducing Kosík’s philosophy to English-speaking readers, we show that Kosík’s work is important not only as a leading intellectual document of the Prague Spring, but also as an original theoretical contribution with international impact that sheds light on the meaning of labour and praxis, cognition and economic structure, and revolution and the crises of modernity.

Contributors include: Ian Angus, Siyaves Azeri, Vít Bartoš, Jan Černý, Joseph Grim Feinberg, Diana Fuentes, Gabriella Fusi, Tomáš Hermann, Tomáš Hříbek, Xiaohan Huang, Peter Hudis, Petr Kužel, Ivan Landa, Michael Löwy, Jan Mervart, Anselm K. Min, Tom Rockmore, Francesco Tava, and Xinruo Zhang.
Author: Eli Kramer
Until rather recently, philosophy, when practiced as a way of life, was, for most, a communal enterprise of mutually reinforced personal cultivation. In these times of social isolation, including in academic philosophy itself, it is time, yet again, to revitalize this lost, but vital, intercultural mode of philosophy. This volume characterizes a neglected communal mode of philosophy — the philosophical community — by describing the constellation of metaethical principles (general, axiological, cultural, and dialectical) that cultivates its values. The book draws on examples from across the globe and history, including interviews of adherents of living philosophical communities.
The Monetary Logic of Early Medieval Conflict Resolution
Volume Editors: Lukas Bothe, Stefan Esders, and Han Nijdam
This volume offers the first comprehensive account of the monetary logic that guided the payment of wergild and blood money in early medieval conflict resolution. In the early middle ages, wergild played multiple roles: it was used to measure a person’s status, to prevent and end conflicts, and to negotiate between an individual and the agents of statehood. This collection of interlocking essays by historians, philologists and jurists represents a major contribution to the study of law and society in Western Europe during the early Middle Ages.

Contributors are Lukas Bothe, Warren Brown, Stefan Esders, Wolfgang Haubrichs, Paul Hyams, Tom Lambert, Ralph W. Mathisen, Rob Meens, Han Nijdam, Lisi Oliver, Harald Siems, Karl Ubl, and Helle Vogt.
Claims and Limits of a Lost Discipline
Volume Editors: Andrea Allerkamp and Martin Roussel
When the Werner Reimers Foundation organized a colloquium on Human Ethology in 1977, it was about Claims and Limits of a New Discipline as a bridge between biology and the social sciences and humanities. As a lost discipline, however, the interdisciplinary approach to ethology only takes shape in a dispersed dispositif. This is the framing argument, which derives from the nucleus of ethology, namely that the starting point of all knowledge is the body in its possibilities of movement in time and space to affect and be affected. In their essays (English or German), the contributors to this collection have worked through the heterogeneity of ethological thought – from Spinoza to Jakob von Uexküll, Gregory Bateson, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Philippe Descola, or Isabelle Stengers – and practice – as, for example in the works of Virginia Woolf or Marcel Beyer – and have taken it as an opportunity to relocate ethology,
I. as an “Immanent Ecology,” with essays by Kerstin Andermann, Hanjo Berressem, and Verena Andermatt Conley
II. in the discussion of “Anthropological Contrasts,” with essays by Marc Rölli, Mirjam Schaub, and Stefan Rieger, and
III. in “Ethological Interferences and Practices,” with essays by Stephan Zandt, Anthony Uhlmann, and Adrian Robanus
A commentary by Sophia Gräfe concludes the volume.