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Critical posthumanism can be understood as the discourse that deconstructively inhabits humanism and critiques its anthropocentrism. It works both genealogically – in historicising the contemporary figure of the posthuman – and speculatively – in imagining, analysing and evaluating scenarios of humanity’s perceived exceptionalism, challenges, or ends. It thus critically engages with unsettling anticipations of the future, provides timely critiques of the present and produces rewritings and alternative narratives with a postanthropocentric or nonhuman dimension. Critical posthumanism’s concerns typically embrace the impacts of bio- and digital technology; ecological crises; the development of artificial intelligence; more-than-human ethics; politics and justice and their interdisciplinary debate within the new or posthumanities.

Critical Posthumanisms is a series addressing all the above. It publishes cutting-edge monographs and edited collections focusing on the rise of posthumanism and its forms, perspectives and directions. It makes available studies by scholars whose perspectives on the posthuman, nonhuman or more-than-human vary in important and interesting ways, and should serve as a crucial point of reference for anybody working within the field.

Books within the series provide:
- inter- or multidisciplinary takes on posthumanism, the posthuman, nonhuman or more-than-human, particularly those allowing the new humanities or posthumanities to critically engage with areas like artificial intelligence, biotechnology, virtual reality, climate change, geo-engineering, etc.;
- analyses of the histories, genealogies, idioms, and canons of different posthumanisms and discussions of the main sources, thinkers and trends of posthumanism;
- alternative formulations of posthumanism, which problematise the centrality of technology;
- philosophical and political critiques of the prosthesisation, enhancement, transformation or transcendence of the human or nonhuman;
- investigations into the role and future of fictional and speculative discourses in literature, film, art, performance, media and science involving scenarios of posthumanisation (or becoming-other-than-human).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.

Manuscripts for this series should eventually follow MHRA style, and preferably use UK spelling.
Volume Editors: and
The cultural change denominated as “the new normal” goes far beyond the adaptation to habits like physical distancing, limited person-to-person contact, teleworking, and self-isolation established with the COVID-19 pandemic. A series of significant transformations in human behavior spreads today in societies all around the world: physical intimacy decreases while virtual reality expands and alterity declines while artificial intelligence emerges, leading to structural reconfigurations of sex, relationships, gender awareness, and subjectivity. Sexuality and Eroticism in a Post-pandemic World explores this new cultural atmosphere through twelve interdisciplinary essays questioning global governmentality and challenging the biopolitics of the new normal—the administration of self-control societies so politically correct that repressed desire for otherness only finds a simulation of its satisfaction with the forced abnormality, outrageousness, and violence of mainstream porn—, going from ars erotica to alternative pornography, from online dating to gender fluidity, from LGBTQI+ artivism to sex life cultivation, and more.
"Origins", Transmissions, and Metamorphoses of Adab literature
The notion of adab is at the very heart of the Islamicate cultures. Born in the crucible of the Arabic and Persian civilisations of the Late Antiquity period, nourished by Greek, Syriac and Indian influences, this polysemic notion could cover a variegated range of meanings, ranging from good behaviour, good manners, etiquette, proper knowledge of the rules, to belles-lettres, and finally, literature. This volume addresses the notion of adab through four perspectives, which correspond to the four parts into which it is divided: “Origins”; “Transmissions”; “Metamorphosis” of the “Origins” and finally “Origins” through the lens of modernity.
Orality, Writing, and the Ontology of the Image
Plato’s dialogues stand at a transition from orality to literacy. They are living contradictions—partly oral and partly literary. This relationship between orality and writing is one of the most vexed issues in the history of Platonic interpretation and has particular relevance for the progressive erosion of literacy in favour of digitalisation today. This book argues that the relationship between the oral and the written in Plato’s dialogues is not a straightforward opposition, but is instead grounded in ontological analysis and exemplified by the ontology of the image, which appears throughout the Platonic canon.
This first in-depth study of Valerius Flaccus’ animals reveals their role in his poetic programme and the manifold ways in which he establishes their subjectivity. In one encounter, a trapped bird becomes a tragic victim, while the trapper is dehumanized. Elsewhere there are touching portrayals of animal/human camaraderie and friendship. Furthermore, Valerius’ provocative consideration of the ‘monstrous’ challenges simplistic definitions of any being’s nature, or the nature of relationships across species. His challenge entails profound ethical implications for his Roman readership, which resonate with us as we assess our own relationship to animals and the natural world today.
Author:
For over thirty years, Arthur Danto was the most important art critic and philosopher of art and aesthetics in the English-speaking world. Arthur Danto's Philosophy of Art: Essays provides a comprehensive and systematic view of his philosophy and criticism by Noël Carroll, Distinguished Professor of the Philosophy of Art, CUNY and himself a former journalist specializing in arts criticism. Danto's writings attracted and still attracts diverse audiences, including aestheticians, artists, art critics, historians, and art lovers. In this book they will find his major themes not only analyzed in depth but also discussions of his political significance, views on history, cinema and more.
Author:
In this book, Gino Zaccaria offers a philosophical meditation on the issue of art in light of its originary sense. He shows how this sense can be fully understood provided that our thinking, on the one hand, returns to the ancient Greek world where it must heed the voice and hints of the goddess Athena, and, on the other hand, listens to “artist-thinkers” close to our current epoch, such as Cézanne, van Gogh and Boccioni. Indeed, the path of this meditation has as its guide the well-known sentence by the painter from Aix-en-Provence, which reads: “Je vous dois la vérité en peinture, et je vous la dirai !”. What will finally appear in this way will not be an abstract or historical notion of art, but its enigma; that is to say, the promise of “another initiation” of art itself.
Editor:
If the universe were conceived to fulfill a certain divine plan or to manifest God’s will and glory, what would the place of an individual be within this plan? What is more, if, from the very beginning of its existence and through divine providence, it were predestined to be driven toward a certain end, how could people adjust their individual lives to the incognizable universal design and react to the obscure future fraught with both luck and failure?

These questions, which have occupied humanity for centuries, formed a remarkable element of early modern European thought. This collection of essays presents new insights into what shaped and constituted reflections on fate and fortune between, roughly, 1400 and 1650, both in word and image. This volume argues that these ideas were emblematic of a more fundamental argument about the self, society, and the universe and shows that their influence was more widespread, geographically and thematically, than hitherto assumed.

Contributors: Damiano Acciarino, Ovanes Akopyan, Elisabeth Blum, Paul Richard Blum, Jo Coture, Guido Giglioni, Dalia Judovitz, Sophie Raux, Orlando Reade, and John Sellars.