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Volume Editors: Gene M. Moore and John G. Peters
The relationship between Conrad’s Malay fiction and colonialism is a prominent subject of commentary now, and has been for some time. Most scholars would point to Chinua Achebe’s important article “An Image of Africa” as the initiation into the interest in Conrad and colonialism, but if fact decades previously, Florence Clemens had begun this conversation in her ground-breaking commentary on Conrad’s Malay fiction. At the time Florence Clemens was writing, almost nothing had been written on the Conrad’s colonial world, and for many years her work thus was relatively unknown and relatively difficult to obtain. However, Clemens’ work is significant, and its appearance in Brill’s Conrad Studies series now makes this important study readily available to scholars.
Throughout his career, self-taught Scottish writer James Hogg (1770-1835) violated literary proprieties which discouraged the frank treatment of prostitution, infanticide, and the violence of war. Contemporary reviewers received Hogg’s bluntness rather fiercely because, in so doing, he questioned the ideologies of chastity, marriage and military masculinities that informed emerging discourses of the British Empire. This book reveals the strategic use that Hogg made of the marriage plot to challenge the civilising ideal of the motherly heroine as well as martial and sentimental masculinities which supported the discourse of a strong but tamed national vigour, thereby highlighting Hogg’s critical use of gender stereotypes in relation to norms of class and ethnicity when deconstructing this plot convention.
A Study of Christian Hermetism in Four Plays
Have you ever wondered why Cordelia has to die? Or how Alonso talks and walks about the isle while his body lies ‘full fathom five’ on the sea floor? Ever wondered why the monument to Shakespeare in the Church of the Holy Trinity in Stratford-upon-Avon names three pagans: Nestor, Socrates, and Virgil – king, philosopher, and poet? Or why Shakespeare is on Olympus, home of the Greek gods? This interdisciplinary study, the first to interpret the plays of Shakespeare in the light of the esoteric religious doctrines of the Corpus Hermeticum, holds answers to these and other puzzling questions.
Volume Editors: Zong-qi Cai and Stephen Roddy
During much of China’s tumultuous 20th century, May 4th and Maoist iconoclasts regarded their classical literary heritage as a burden to be dislodged in the quest for modernization. This volume demonstrates how the traditions that had deeply impressed earlier generations of Western writers like Goethe and Voltaire did not lose their lustre; to the contrary, a fascination with these past riches sprouted with renewed vigour among Euro-American poets, novelists, and other cultural figures after the fall of imperial China in 1911. From Petrograd to Paris, and from São Paolo to San Francisco, China’s premodern poetry, theatre, essays, and fiction inspired numerous prominent writers and intellectuals. The contributors survey the fruits of this engagement in multiple Western languages and nations.
Author: David W. Music
The hymns of Isaac Watts are a remarkable blend of biblical, theological, liturgical, poetic, musical, and practical dimensions, some of which have seldom been touched upon in previous studies of the hymn writer. In this book, you will find analyses of Watts’s texts from each of these perspectives. As shown by this study, it is not only these individual factors but their combination that made Watts’s hymns innovative but also effective and long lasting in his own time—and that makes many of them still useful and widely sung today.
The Contemplacioun of Synnaris, by the Observant Franciscan William Touris, written c.1494 and evidently intended for King James IV of Scotland, is a significant and much copied work of Older Scots, although the earliest surviving witness is the English print by Wynkyn de Worde (1499).
The Contemplacioun was the very first work of Older Scots literature to be translated and to be printed. The poem’s seven sections comprise a course of meditations for Holy Week. Richard Fox, bishop of Durham, commissioned the English print, in which the stanzas were preceded by Latin sententiae, biblical, medieval and ancient. The work retained sufficient interest to re-emerge in separate versions in both Scotland (1568) and England (1578), drastically revised for Protestant readers.
Essays on James Joyce’s Ulysses by Fritz Senn
Author: Fritz Senn
The reader will be delighted by the numerous gems gathered together and will find that Senn’s unflagging enthusiasm investigating the craftmanship of Joyce’s work infectious. Senn, a witty and thought provoking astute reader, shows that, even after one hundred years, there is still more to discover in James Joyce’s Ulysses.
A Postcolonial Re-envisioning
The Yeats -Tagore friendship and the eventual curious fallout between the two remain a mystery; the focus of this volume is a postcolonial reading of the two writers’ friendship, the critical reception of Tagore in 1912 England, and Tagore’s erasure from Western literary discourse. The essays in this volume take a decolonial turn to critically analyze the two writers in the discourse of power that is a part of their larger story.

The nuances that appear in the pages of this illuminating book explore the meaning of "the politics of friendship" and the sense of intercultural relationship marred by colonialism. The volume re-envisions what the "postcolonial" can mean, be, and do. We can learn from the two major figures and their work and create a new vision of that problematic preposition "post.<
- Professor Mieke Bal, ASCA (Amsterdam School of Cultural Analysis).

This volume offers a magnificent illustration of how to retell the story of a cross-cultural literary relationship from a decolonial perspective. Ghosh and Redwine’s edited collection exemplifies the need of the hour: to reassess the value of literary traditions, institutions, and relationships while illuminating the politics of colonialism and racism that compromises them.
- Deepika Bahri, Professor of English, Emory University; Author of Postcolonial Biology.