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Published on behalf of the Association for the Study of the New Literatures in English (ASNEL/GNEL).

ASNEL Papers is a subseries of Cross/Cultures.
The electronic version of the Costerus New Serie.

Costerus is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s). Besides the more classical research in English, American and Irish literature, do we offer a platform for new directions in literary studies in relation to translation studies, minority literatures, ecology, medical humanities, hemispheric studies, transatlantic studies, network studies and social sciences, as well as reflections on studies in English literature as a discipline.
All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

The series published an average of five volumes per year over the last 5 years. See Less
Studies in English Worldwide
Costerus is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s). Besides the more classical research in English, American and Irish literature, do we offer a platform for new directions in literary studies in relation to translation studies, minority literatures, ecology, medical humanities, hemispheric studies, transatlantic studies, network studies and social sciences, as well as reflections on studies in English literature as a discipline.
All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
Readings in Post/Colonial Literatures and Cultures in English
Active since 1990, Cross/Cultures covers the whole range of the colonial and post-colonial experience across the English-speaking world as well as the literatures and cultures of non-anglophone countries. The series accomodates both studies by single authors and edited critical collections.

The broad spectrum of Cross/Cultures can be illustrated by book topics as diverse as black South African autobiography, Kenyan settler writing, the African-Jamaican aesthetic, Australian and New Zealand poetry, Southeast Asian art after 1990, diasporic trauma in Caribbean writing and women’s fiction of the Sri Lankan diaspora. Cross/Cultures has also published monograph treatments of such writers as Chinua Achebe, J.M. Coetzee, Kate Grenville, Caryl Phillips, Raja Rao, Derek Walcott, and Patrick White.

Included in Cross/Cultures are collections of selected and revised papers from important conferences (ASNEL Papers = GAPS; ACLALS; EACLALS).
All book proposals and MSS undergo double blind peer review by experts in the field, after being admitted for consideration by the series editors, for whom open-mindedness and catholicity of interests are hallmark values as well as maintaining scholarly accuracy.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
A Postcolonial Re-envisioning
The Yeats -Tagore friendship and the eventual curious fallout between the two remain a mystery; the focus of this volume is a postcolonial reading of the two writers’ friendship, the critical reception of Tagore in 1912 England, and Tagore’s erasure from Western literary discourse. The essays in this volume take a decolonial turn to critically analyze the two writers in the discourse of power that is a part of their larger story.

The nuances that appear in the pages of this illuminating book explore the meaning of "the politics of friendship" and the sense of intercultural relationship marred by colonialism. The volume re-envisions what the "postcolonial" can mean, be, and do. We can learn from the two major figures and their work and create a new vision of that problematic preposition "post.<
- Professor Mieke Bal, ASCA (Amsterdam School of Cultural Analysis).

This volume offers a magnificent illustration of how to retell the story of a cross-cultural literary relationship from a decolonial perspective. Ghosh and Redwine’s edited collection exemplifies the need of the hour: to reassess the value of literary traditions, institutions, and relationships while illuminating the politics of colonialism and racism that compromises them.
- Deepika Bahri, Professor of English, Emory University; Author of Postcolonial Biology.
Postcolonial Lives is a series of interpretative auto/biographies of postcolonial subjects – writers, artists, intellectuals, groups, movements, networks, animals, objects – broadly conceived to cover all significant points of intersection – e.g. indigenous, transnational, post-national, cosmopolitan, post-human (human and non-human, or more-than-human). The series focuses intensively on lives that have been lived as well as made in a postcolonial condition, and in proximity to an expanded field of alterity. It aims also to locate auto/biography specifically as a significant dimension of postcolonial studies.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
In this groundbreaking book, Andrey Makarychev approaches populism through a critical biopolitical lens and shows that populist narratives are grounded intrinsically in corporeality, sexuality, health, bodily life and religious practices. The author demonstrates that populism is a phenomenon deeply rooted in mass culture. He compares three countries -- Estonia, Ukraine and Russia--that all share post-Soviet experiences offering a broad spectrum of populist discourses. The three case studies display the interconnection between biopower and populism through references to culture, media, art, theatrical performances and literature, raising new questions and directions for understanding traditional accounts of populism.
Poverty and precarity are among the most pressing social issues of today and have become a significant thematic focus and analytical tool in the humanities in the last two decades. This volume brings together an international group of scholars who investigate conceptualisations of poverty and precarity from the perspective of literary and cultural studies as well as linguistics. Analysing literature, visual arts and news media from across the postcolonial world, they aim at exploring the frameworks of representation that impact affective and ethical responses to disenfranchised groups and precarious subjects. Case studies focus on intersections between precarity and race, class, and gender, institutional frameworks of publishing, environmental precarity, and the framing of refugees and migrants as precarious subjects.

Contributors: Clelia Clini, Geoffrey V. Davis, Dorothee Klein, Sue Kossew, Maryam Mirza, Anna Lienen, Julia Hoydis, Susan Nalugwa Kiguli, Sule Emmanuel Egya, Malcolm Sen, Jan Rupp, J.U. Jacobs, Julian Wacker, Andreas Musolff, Janet M. Wilson
Black Neo-Victoriana is the first book-length study on contemporary re-imaginations of Blackness in the long nineteenth century. Located at the intersections of postcolonial studies, Black studies, and neo-Victorian criticism, this interdisciplinary collection engages with the global trend to reimagine and rewrite Black Victorian subjectivities that have been continually marginalised in both historical and cultural discourses. Contributions cover a range of media, from novels and drama to film, television and material culture, and draw upon cultural formations such as Black fandom, Black dandyism, or steamfunk. The book evidences how neo-Victorian studies benefits from reading re-imaginations of the long nineteenth century vis-à-vis Black epistemologies, which unhinge neo-Victorianism’s dominant spatial and temporal axes and reroute them to conceive of the (neo-)Victorian through Blackness.
A Complete English Translation
Author: Sohrab Sepehri
Editors / Translators: Pouneh Shabani-Jadidi and Prashant Keshavmurthy
The Eight Books: A Complete English Translation is the first complete translation of the collected poems of Sohrab Sepehri (1928-1980), a major Iranian modernist poet and painter and yet under-translated into English. The introduction takes up Sepehri's famously difficult if languidly beautiful style to explain it as a series of appropriations of global modernisms in poetry and painting. It offers close readings of how Sepehri's modernism follows and breaks with the jagged rhythms of Nima Yushij (d.1960), Iran's inaugural modernist poet. In keeping with this modernist framing, the translations replicate Sepehri's rhymes where possible, his fluctuations between formal and colloquial registers, his syntactic distortions, and his embeddings of governmental and other jargons. It also includes Sepehri's autobiography.