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Les princesses ottomanes à l’aune du pouvoir (XVe-XVIIIe s.)
Author: Juliette Dumas
Les femmes ottomanes n’auraient pas leur place en politique ; recluses dans leur harem, elles passeraient leur temps en distractions superficielles ou en intrigues pernicieuses : tel est l’héritage de l’orientalisme et de l’historiographie traditionnelle. Loin de ces poncifs, cet ouvrage propose une plongée dans les cadres institutionnels et sociaux ottomans, qui commandent le spectre des interactions sociales et politiques des femmes de la cour ottomane, en prenant pour champ d’étude une figure largement ignorée de l’historiographie : les filles de sang des souverains ottomans – les sultanes.

Ottoman women would have no place in politics; recluse in their harem, they would pass their time in superficial distractions or in pernicious intrigues: such is the heritage of Orientalism and traditional historiography. Far from these clichés, this work offers a dive into the Ottoman institutional and social frameworks, which govern the spectrum of social and political interactions of the women of the Ottoman court, taking as a field of study a figure largely ignored by historiography: the blood daughters of the Ottoman rulers – the sultanas.
Throughout his career, self-taught Scottish writer James Hogg (1770-1835) violated literary proprieties which discouraged the frank treatment of prostitution, infanticide, and the violence of war. Contemporary reviewers received Hogg’s bluntness rather fiercely because, in so doing, he questioned the ideologies of chastity, marriage and military masculinities that informed emerging discourses of the British Empire. This book reveals the strategic use that Hogg made of the marriage plot to challenge the civilising ideal of the motherly heroine as well as martial and sentimental masculinities which supported the discourse of a strong but tamed national vigour, thereby highlighting Hogg’s critical use of gender stereotypes in relation to norms of class and ethnicity when deconstructing this plot convention.
Volume Editors: Anna Kathryn Grau and Lisa Colton
This collection of seventeen essays newly identifies contributions to musical culture made by women before 1500 across Europe. You will learn about repertoire from such diverse locations as Iceland, Spain, and Italy, and encounter examples of musicianship from the gender-fluid professional musicians at the Islamicate courts of Syria to the nuns of Barking Abbey in England.
The book shows that women drove musical patronage, dissemination, composition, and performance, including within secular and ecclesiastical contexts, and also reflects on the reception of medieval women’s musical agency by both medieval poets and by modern recording artists.
Contributors are David Catalunya, Lisa Colton, Helen Dell, Annemari Ferreira, Rachel Golden, Gillian L. Gower, Anna Kathryn Grau, Carissa M. Harris, Louise McInnes, Lisa Nielson, Lauren Purcell-Joiner, Megan Quinlan, Leah Stuttard, Claire Taylor Jones, Melissa Tu, Angelica Vomera, and Anne Bagnall Yardley.
This volume explores issues and themes related to violence against women. It is distinctive in two ways. First, the editors have convened an international cohort of contributing scholars, whose assessment of the pervasiveness and urgency of the problems and their proposals for solutions derives from their pneumatology: their theology of the Holy Spirit. Second, this book represents quite simply the first sustained effort to bring together in one volume Pentecostal voices from a variety of academic disciplines, ecclesial traditions, and cultural situations to address the urgent issues associated with violence toward women.
Evil women, who are they really? What are their motives, and how are they remembered and constructed within our culture? Evil Women: Representations within Literature, Culture and Film seeks to interrogate the nature and construction of evil women in the above fields. Through literature, poetry, history, ballads, film and real-life culture, scholars explore how the evil woman has been constructed and, in some cases, erased; the punishment and treatment of evil women; and the way evil women have been portrayed on and off screen through character, narrative and behind the camera development.
Las poetas y la transformación del discurso poético en los siglos 20 y 21
Volume Editor: Esther Sánchez-Pardo
Peter Damian’s The Book of Gomorrah and Alain de Lille’s The Plaint of Nature
Author: David Rollo
What happens if a cleric breaks his vows of sexual abstinence? What happens if the cleric in question does so repeatedly with other men of his vocation? Eleventh-century theologian Peter Damian provides a response.
What happens if an author uses metaphor as a metaphor signifying and excoriating male same-sex relations, yet does so in a text showing an exuberant and unabashed orientation towards metaphorical language? Is the author in question rhetorically perpetrating precisely the so-called affront to nature he grammatically denounces? Twelfth-century poet Alain de Lille enacts an ambiguously enigmatic response.
Women’s Speculative Fiction in Contemporary Japan
Author: Kazue Harada
Contemporary Japanese female speculative fiction writers of novels and manga employ the perspectives of aliens, cyborgs, and bioengineered entities to critique the social realities of women, particularly with respect to reproduction, which they also re-imagine in radical ways. Harada examines the various meanings of (re)production in light of feminist and queer studies and offers close readings of works by novelists Murata Sayaka, Ōhara Mariko, Ueda Sayuri and manga artists Hagio Moto and Shirai Yumiko. Scholarship of SF in Japanese studies has primarily focused on male authors, but this book shows not only how women writers have created a space in SF and speculative fiction but how their work can be seen as a response to particular social norms and government policies.
Author: Andrea Branchi
In Pride, Manners, and Morals: Bernard Mandeville’s Anatomy of Honour Andrea Branchi offers a reading of the Anglo-Dutch physician and thinker’s philosophical project from the hitherto neglected perspective of his lifelong interest in the theme of honour. Through an examination of Mandeville’s anatomy of early eighteenth-century beliefs, practices and manners in terms of motivating passions, the book traces the development of his thought on human nature and the origin of sociability.

By making honour and its roots in the desire for recognition the central thread of Mandeville’s theory of society, Andrea Branchi offers a unified reading of his work and highlights his relevance as a thinker far beyond the moral problem of commercial societies, opening up new perspectives in Mandeville’s studies.