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Selected Papers of Mark Olssen
Author: Mark Olssen
Inspired by the writings of Michel Foucault, Olssen’s writings traverse philosophy, politics, education, and epistemology. This book comprises a selection of his papers published in academic journals and books over twenty-five years. Taken as a whole, the papers represent a redirection of the core axioms and directions of western ontology and philosophy in relation to how history, the subject, and education are theorised within the western philosophical tradition. Olssen’s writings not only contain a powerful critique and revision of western liberalism from a poststructuralist perspective, they both explicate and extend Michel Foucault’s challenge to the core axioms and assumptions underpinning western thought. As Stephen Ball suggests in his Foreword to this volume, “Olssen uses Foucault to explore issues… Olssen’s Foucault is not a lonely nihilist but a troubled provocateur who encourages in us toward the political project of self-formation – our relation to ourselves and always, to others."
Volume Editors: Linda Ware and Janet Story Sauer
Volume Editors: Annica Andersson and Richard Barwell
There is no shortage of urgent, complex problems that mathematics education can and should engage with. Pandemics, forest fires, pollution, Black Lives Matter protests, and fake news all involve mathematics, are matters of life and death, have a clear political dimension, and are interdisciplinary in nature. They demand a critical approach. The authors in this volume showcase new insights, teaching ideas and new and unique ways of applying critical mathematics education, in areas as diverse as climate change, obesity, decolonisation and ethnomathematics. This book demonstrates that there is plenty to be done with critical mathematics education.

Contributors are: Annica Andersson, Tonya Gau Bartell, Richard Barwell, Lisa Lunney Borden, Sunghwan Byun, Anna Chronaki, Brian Greer, Jennifer Hall, Victoria Hand, Kjellrun Hiis Hauge, Beth Herbel-Eisenmann, Rune Herheim, Courtney Koestler, Kate le Roux, Swapna Mukhopadhyay, Aldo Parra, Anita Rampal, Sheena Rughubar-Reddy, Toril Eskeland Rangnes, Ulrika Ryan, Lisa Steffensen, Paola Valero and David Wagner.
The author argues in his essay on the Revolution of the Right to Education that the birth of the human right to education, after a millennia-long gestation, has opened up a new chapter in the History of Education. Moreover, its normative, jurisprudential, doctrinal, and programmatic developments are constituents of an International Education Law that is now the highest source in the hierarchy of the contemporary normativity on education, to which the Education Law in States Parties should conform. Therefore, it should be recognised and studied as a new legal and educational discipline, the source of principles of legitimacy and quality of education.

This book offers an interdisciplinary and topical introduction to the International Education Law, broadly defined. It explains in what ways the normative integrity of the right to education carries far-reaching revolutionary significance, corollary of the Revolution of Human Rights and the Revolution of the Rights of the Child.
Historically, African higher education teaching and learning have relied on Western models, paradigms, assumptions, concepts and procedures, among other research related aspects. Western hegemony and ideology has influenced and continues to influence the epistemologies and both the methods and outcome of higher education research. The connection between teaching and learning is that teaching generates new forms of learning and learning challenges methods of teaching. Western claims to universality, objectivity and neutrality have dominated research paradigms in African higher education institutions to the detriment of alternative approaches and conceptions of knowledge. Methods aligned to African teaching and learning are often unrecognised and thus underutilised despite calls for the mantra for decolonial research methods. What are the African indigenous ways of teaching and learning? How are they related to the present African university? These puzzling questions provoke the minds of scholars on Africa to confront the discourse on decolonisation of higher education as they engage head-on and interrogate contemporary teaching and learning methods. Mediating Learning in Higher Education in Africa: From Critical Thinking to Social Justice Pedagogies provides critical reflections to some of the above questions that affect African Higher Education as it seeks to transform itself and provide directions for the future.
Series Editors: Juanjo Mena, Ruth Kane, and Cheryl J. Craig
The ISATT conference series represents an effort to compile international research and practices on Teacher Education. It draws upon a variety of educational approaches, procedures, and teaching contexts where the field takes form. The aims and scope of the ISATT book series is to promote and bring together the best papers presented at the Biennial conferences of the association. The ISATT’s main goal is to increase insights into the identity, role, contexts and work of teachers, and the process of teaching.
The Power of Autoethnographic Narratives in Education
Educational reality is weaved within stories, poems, and dialogues, as the author demonstrates his becoming of a transformative educator. Transformative learning is important for teachers to think about their practices, change their thinking, and share the stories of their experience for learners’ empowerment.

This is an autoethnographic account of the author's experience as a transformative and transforming educator that unfolds the ways he has used ethical dilemma story pedagogy to explore interpretative and creative spaces for transformative learning, both personally and with a group of trainee teachers who take the responsibility to facilitate students’ learning into a purposeful path. The ethical dilemma story pedagogy provides relatable scenarios to challenge and unsettle learners’ thought processes leading to acknowledgment of multiple viewpoints. Theorising Transformative Learning serves to help educators utilise the sociocultural contexts connected to students’ lives and experiences.
Homeschooling
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A Guidebook of Practices, Claims, Issues, and Implications
In this volume, the author offers an exploratory analysis of the history of homeschooling in the United States, current curricular practices, religious and political rationales for homeschooling, a critique of the claims by homeschooling advocates that the practice leads to greater efficiency and effectiveness, and what homeschooling and individualistic-oriented approaches mean for society.

Teaching the next generation at home is, with little doubt, the oldest form of educating children. Yet, this simplistic understanding of “homeschooling” does not adequately capture the growth of homeschooling as a practice in the 21st century nor is it a widely accessible form of “school choice” for most families. While many parents keep their children out of formal schooling – public and private – for myriad reasons, what is clear is that homeschooling is the epitome of a conceiving of education as an individualistic good – a commodity – that can, or should, be done outside of a conception of the common good, a reasonable understanding of teaching as a profession, and the elevation of ideological echo chambers of information which can have deleterious impacts on the students who are homeschooled and society, broadly.
Volume Editors: Nasser Mansour and Heba EL-Deghaidy
This book presents an international perspective of the influence of cultural issues on STEM reform. Effective STEM education is of considerable importance internationally because there is increase pressure by governments to produce technically skilled people from the compulsory education sectors; people capable of participating actively in the so-called’ knowledge economy’ or knowledge society. An important and distinguishing feature of the book is that it draws upon the empirical experiences and research of the local experts from an extremely diverse cohort across the world.

Contributors are: Nayif Awad, David Barlex, Alexandra Bazdar, Saouma BouJaoude, Heba EL-Deghaidy, Marwa Eltanahy, Sibel Erduran, Sufian Forawi, Clare Gartland, Lilia Halim, Ying-Shao Hsu, Zanaton Haji Iksan, Deena Khalil, Meredith Kier, Nasser Mansour, Mohamad Sattar Rasul, Seema Rivera, Dalene Swanson, Paige Teamey, Tuan Mastura Tuan Soh, Russell Tytler, Noël Williams and Yi-Fen Yeh.
This book focuses on reflective writing, guiding teachers to recognize their potential as professional leaders. The shift to online and blended learning models now favored in education encourages a broader understanding of leadership, particularly its growing relevance to teachers. These models, combined with reflective writing, foster flexible, inclusive teacher learning that responds to each teacher’s strengths, can be used individually and collaboratively to develop teachers as leaders inside and outside the classroom who are critically involved in creating their own professional learning environments. The authors examine leadership in a global range of teaching contexts, each chapter raising diverse issues for teachers aspiring to be leaders in this post-COVID world.

All royalties from this book are donated to the Instituto dos Cegos da Paraiba Adalgisa Cunha (ICPAC), a school in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil, that serves the low vision and blind community in the area. For years, the Institute has collaborated as a supervised internship site for various teacher education university programs, providing inspiring field work experiences such as those described in Chapter 4 by Carla Reichmann. Brill is proud to support this important cause and match the donation to the Instituto dos Cegos da Paraiba Adalgisa Cunha (ICPAC).