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Selected Papers of Mark Olssen
Author: Mark Olssen
Inspired by the writings of Michel Foucault, Olssen’s writings traverse philosophy, politics, education, and epistemology. This book comprises a selection of his papers published in academic journals and books over twenty-five years. Taken as a whole, the papers represent a redirection of the core axioms and directions of western ontology and philosophy in relation to how history, the subject, and education are theorised within the western philosophical tradition. Olssen’s writings not only contain a powerful critique and revision of western liberalism from a poststructuralist perspective, they both explicate and extend Michel Foucault’s challenge to the core axioms and assumptions underpinning western thought. As Stephen Ball suggests in his Foreword to this volume, “Olssen uses Foucault to explore issues… Olssen’s Foucault is not a lonely nihilist but a troubled provocateur who encourages in us toward the political project of self-formation – our relation to ourselves and always, to others."
Series Editors: Juanjo Mena, Ruth Kane, and Cheryl J. Craig
The ISATT conference series represents an effort to compile international research and practices on Teacher Education. It draws upon a variety of educational approaches, procedures, and teaching contexts where the field takes form. The aims and scope of the ISATT book series is to promote and bring together the best papers presented at the Biennial conferences of the association. The ISATT’s main goal is to increase insights into the identity, role, contexts and work of teachers, and the process of teaching.
Author: D. G. Mulcahy
Gen Ed is a novel that locates serious discussion of general education in the context of some of the day-to-day realities encountered in putting it into practice and promoting efforts at reform at Metropolitan Atlantic University (aka the Metro). This dual focus is found in the often-pugnacious policy debate among the faculty and a more light-hearted discussion of related questions carried on by Professor Kelly as he models Socratic teaching in his upper-level class for prospective teachers. Reforming general education at the Metro is not free of the vanities and vulgarities of ambitious men and women and self-serving politicians, of course, nor those who poke fun at them. Arnie Smatter, the irrepressible and nosey chat show host of Radio YOY ensures that this does not go unnoticed.

The overall humorous tone of Gen Ed does not detract from Mulcahy’s thoughtful treatment of substantive issues that will be of interest to serious scholars, students, and a general readership. It is the behaviour of those involved, the broader media and political contexts in which events take place, which mainly becomes the object of humorous treatment.
Jean-François Lyotard, Pedagogy, Thought
Author: Derek R. Ford
In the first monograph on Lyotard and education, the author approaches Lyotard’s thought as pedagogical in itself. The result is a novel, soft, and accessible study of Lyotard organized around two inhuman educations: that of “the system” and that of “the human.” The former enforces an interminable process of development, dialogue and exchange, while the latter finds its force in the mute, secret, opaque, and inarticulable.

Threading together a range of Lyotard’s work through four pedagogical processes—reading, writing, voicing, and listening—the author insists on the distinct educational logics that can uphold or interrupt different ways of being-together in the world, touching on a range of topics from literacy and aesthetics to time and political-economy. While Inhuman Educations can serve as an introduction to Lyotard’s philosophy, it also constitutes a singular, provocative, and fresh take on his thought.
Editor: Ali A. Abdi
With the limited availability of related foci in the area of critical educational studies, Critical Theorizations of Education is timely in both its topical relevance and time-space-themed discursive interventions. With its overall scope, constructed as both a counter-and-forward looking critical reflections and analysis of some of the most salient and contemporaneously active platforms of education, it prospectively and relatively comprehensively expands on dynamically intersecting learning and teaching contexts and relationships. As such, the volume’s contents by both established and emerging scholars, selectively locate the interplays of knowledge, learning and attendant power relations, which either transform or reproduce the status quo.

Contributors are: Levonne Abshire, Claire Alkouatli, David Anderson, Neda Asadi, N’Dri Thérèse Assié-Lumumba, Gulbahar Beckett, José Cossa, Ratna Ghosh, Shibao Guo, Yan Guo, Carl E. James, Dip Kapoor, Festus Kelonye Beru, Ginette Lafreniere, Qing Li, Oliver Masakure, Magnus Mfoafo-M'Carthy, Greg William Misiaszek, Dolana Mogadime, Samson Nashon, Selline Ooko, Bathseba Opini, Amy Parent, Thashika Pillay, Edward Shizha, Kimberley Tavares, Alison Taylor, and Stacey Wilson-Forsberg.
Curriculum studies is at the core of the educational endeavour and informs what happens in every educational institution. As a result of its criticality or primacy, every educational practitioner appears to claim expertise in curriculum matters and what direction the field should take. In Africa, the curriculum practitioner has been given little or no space to theorise and orient the future of the field in Africa. Instead, European, and American curriculum theorisers have been allowed to exert a marked influence on the nature and direction of African theoretical and philosophical underpinnings. This situation raises fundamental questions about the future of education in Africa and this volume explores and answers these questions relating to curriculum theory, theorising and the theoriser by breaking traditions and experimenting on alternative approaches and pathways.

Contributors are: Aruna Ankiah-Gangadeen, Lynn Biggs, Eunice Champion, Taryn Isaacs De Vega, Kehdinga George Fomunyam, Nadaraj Govender, Angela James, Simon Bheki Khoza, Noma China Kubashe, Nehemiah Latolla, Jacqui Lück, Dumisa Celumusa Mabuza, Simeon Maile, Suriamurthee Maistry, Makhulu A. Makumane, Zvisinei Moyo, Cedric Bheki Mpungose, Pascal Nadal, Blanche Ntombizodwa Ndlovu, Christopher Ndlovu, Emily Mangwaya Ndlovu, Nellie Ngcongo-James, Deirdre Pratt, Mukhtar Raban, Nolundi Radana, Makhosazana Edith Shoba, Mahlapahlapana Themane, Molaodi Tshelane and Denise Zinn.
International Educationalist Perspectives
Volume Editor: Brent Bradford
Includes a prize-winning chapter by the winner of the 2021 Early Career Award of the International Narrative Research Special Interest Group of the American Education Research Association. Trudy Cardinal was awarded this prize, among other publications, for chapter 11 in The Doctoral Journey: International Educationalist Perspectives: An Autobiographical Narrative Inquiry into the Experiences of One Cree/Métis Doctoral Student.

The Doctoral Journey: International Educationalist Perspectives assembles a collective narrative related to the doctoral journey of recent graduates in the field of education. Clearly, the doctoral journey is not a linear process but rather a lattice of ever-evolving professional and personal relationships, experiences, perspectives, and insights.

From early on when considering whether or not to apply to a programme, to deciding on an institution and supervisor, to delving into the related literature, to data collection and analyses, to closing in on the defence, to results dissemination, and everything in between and beyond, the doctoral journey presents incalculable obstacles that can be, and have been, overcome by doctoral graduates—including the contributors in this inspirationally-sparked collective narrative.

Contributors are: Trudy Cardinal, Philip Wing Keung Chan, José da Costa, Alison Egan, Janet McConaghy, June McConaghy, Kelsey McEntyre, Sammy M. Mutisya, Christina A. Parker, Carla L. Peck, Colin G. Pennington, Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, Edgar Schmidt, and Pearl Subban.
Volume Editor: Zachary A. Casey
While critical whiteness studies as a field has been attacked from both within and without, the ongoing realities of systemic white supremacy across the globe necessitate new and better understandings of whiteness, white racial identity, and their links with education. Encyclopedia of Critical Whiteness Studies in Education offers readers a broad summary of the multifaceted and interdisciplinary field of critical whiteness studies, the study of white racial identities in the context of white supremacy, in education. Featuring scholars from across the Anglophone world, this volume seeks to offer both introductions and deep dives into the ever-shifting field of critical whiteness research in education.
Artful Works and Dialogue about Art as Experience
Volume Editors: Patricia L. Maarhuis and A.G. Rud
Imagining Dewey features productive (re)interpretations of 21st century experience using the lens of John Dewey’s Art as Experience, through the doubled task of putting an array of international philosophers, educators, and artists-researchers in transactional dialogue and on equal footing in an academic text. This book is a pragmatic attempt to encourage application of aesthetic learning and living, ekphrasic interpretation, critical art, and agonist pluralism.

There are two foci: (a) Deweyan philosophy and educational themes with (b) analysis and examples of how educators, artists, and researchers envision and enact artful meaning making. This structure meets the needs of university and high school audiences, who are accustomed to learning about challenging ideas through multimedia and aesthetic experience.

Contributors are: James M. Albrecht, Adam I. Attwood, John Baldacchino, Carolyn L. Berenato, M. Cristina Di Gregori, Holly Fairbank, Jim Garrison, Amanda Gulla, Bethany Henning, Jessica Heybach, David L. Hildebrand, Ellyn Lyle, Livio Mattarollo, Christy McConnell Moroye, María-Isabel Moreno-Montoro, María Martínez Morales, Stephen M. Noonan, Louise G. Phillips, Scott L. Pratt, Joaquin Roldan, Leopoldo Rueda, Tadd Ruetenik, Leísa Sasso, Bruce Uhrmacher, David Vessey, Ricardo Marín Viadel, Sean Wiebe, Li Xu and Martha Patricia Espíritu Zavalza.
Author: Ligia Pelosi
The Joy Principle is a fictionalised novel about teachers and teaching in neoliberal times. It addresses the themes of teacher agency within a context of critical and creative praxis. The story centres on Alex, a graduate teacher who decides to disrupt the mandated pedagogical practices of literacy education. As an agent of transformative change, Alex provides an examination of how children learn best and how teachers can re-author themselves in their work within the constraints of contemporary practice. The novel is accompanied by a commentary on arts-based, narrative fiction as research.