Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 120 items for :

  • Gender & Education x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Volume Editors: and
Step into the lives of extraordinary women leaders in this groundbreaking volume. This compelling collection presents autoethnographies of twenty-five women leaders in English Language Teaching (ELT) from around the world. Grounded in key leadership theories and ELT research, these narratives examine the intersectionality of gender, race, culture, and transnational experiences in shaping leadership identities. Authors candidly share their triumphs and challenges, inspiring readers to embrace their own leadership potential and effect change in their communities and beyond. By articulating the personal, institutional, and global complexities, the narratives inform our understanding of how ELT teachers navigate the path to leadership.

Contributors are: Tasha Austin, Lena Barrantes-Elizondo, Kisha Bryan, Quanisha Charles, May F. Chung, Ayanna Cooper, Tanya Cowie, Taslim Damji, Darlyne de Haan, Su Yin Khor, Sarah Henderson Lee, Gloria Park, Ana-Marija Petrunic, Doaa Rashed, Kate Mastruserio Reynolds, Teri Rose Dominica Roh, Mary Romney-Schaab, Amira Salama, Cristina Sánchez-Martín, Xatli Stox, Debra Suarez, Shannon Tanghe, Lan Wang-Hiles, Marie Webb and Amea Wilbur.
Series Editor:
The series will commission books in the broad area of professional life and work. This is a burgeoning area of study now in educational research with more and more books coming out on teachers’ lives and work, on nurses’ life and work, and on the whole interface between professional knowledge and professional lives.
The focus on life and work has been growing rapidly in the last two decades. There are a number of rationales for this. Firstly, there is a methodological impulse: many new studies are adopting a life history approach. The life history tradition aims to understand the interface between people’s life and work and to explore the historical context and the socio-political circumstances in which people’s professional life and work is located. The growth in life history studies demands a series of books which allow people to explore this methodological focus within the context of professional settings.
The second rationale for growth in this area is a huge range of restructuring initiatives taking place throughout the world. There is in fact a world movement to restructure education and health. In most forms this takes the introduction of more targets, tests and tables and increasing accountability and performativity regimes. These initiatives have been introduced at governmental level – in most cases without detailed consultation with the teaching and nursing workforces. As a result there is growing evidence of a clash between people’s professional life and work missions and the restructuring initiatives which aim to transform these missions. One way of exploring this increasingly acute clash of values is through studies of professional life and work. Hence the European Commission, for instance, have begun to commission quite large studies of professional life and work focussing on teachers and nurses. One of these projects – the Professional Knowledge Network project has studied teachers’ and nurses’ life and work in seven countries. There will be a range of books coming out from this project and it is intended to commission the main books on nurses and on teachers for this series.
The series will begin with a number of works which aim to define and delineate the field of professional life and work. One of the first books ‘Investigating the Teacher’s Life and Work’ by Ivor Goodson will attempt to bring together the methodological and substantive approaches in one book. This is something of a ‘how to do’ book in that it looks at how such studies can be undertaken as well as what kind of generic findings might be anticipated.
Future books in the series might expect to look at either the methodological approach of studying professional life and work or provide substantive findings from research projects which aim to investigate professional life and work particularly in education and health settings.
The Teaching Gender series publishes monographs, anthologies and reference books that deal centrally with gender and/or sexuality. The books are intended to be used in undergraduate and graduate classes across the disciplines. The series aims to promote social justice with an emphasis on feminist, multicultural and critical perspectives.
Contemporary art must get inspiration from somewhere. In Tea, Automatons, and Time Machines, the subculture of Steampunk art is studied in relation to art history. Addressing three main topics within social and environmental justice, a comparison of art styles and creativity stems from an artist’s passion within popular culture.

Using arts-based research methods and personal introspection viewed through the lens of nostalgia, a unique perspective of art history studies comes to life. Nostalgia, being primarily a psychological study, is used as a lens to view art, culture, and memoir into a complete research project.

We live in a world in need of change. Historically, artists have provided a means for change through their work and the lives they choose to live. The vastness of art history provides plenty of room for inspiration and interpretation. In this study, the contemporary sub-culture of Steampunk looks nostalgically at Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco eras in a way that paves the way for social change and environmental preservation using fantasy, cos-play, and art to demonstrate needed changes. Through the art and culture of Steampunk, we explore areas that could use improvement in our modern world, and yet, they do tie in with similar occurrences of the past. We find that we’re not that different but with art and demonstration, we too, can make positive changes for our future.
Volume Editors: , , and
The world ecological system is marked by difference throughout. There is social difference with different identities, shifting and transmuting, being forged, and extra-human differences. All these have implications for intra human and human/non-human earth relations. This aspect is not always recognised and valorised. Education, though not an independent variable, still can be mobilised, together with other sources of potential transformation, to redress this situation marked by aggressions, micro and macro, inertia and indifference. It represents a number of immediate challenges for Adult Education. This compendium is intended as a useful resource in this regard. It maps out a kaleidoscope of myriad differences and suggests options for overcoming the various obstacles that stand opposed to those who seek fulfilment in the way they are discursively located. The obstacles are a dent on efforts to living in communion with the rest of the cosmos. The utopian view is that of different species living in harmony with each other. This book emphasises social/ecological justice, intersectionality and relationality as the targets for Adult Education in this relatively still new millennium.

Contributors are: Sharifah Salmah Binti Abdullah, Thi Bogossian, Lauren Bouttell, Lidiane Nunes de Castro, Anyela Nathalie Gomez Deantonio, Preeti Dagar, Raquel Galeano Giminez, Ksenija Joksimović, Kainat Khurshid, Robert Livingston, Peter Mayo, Sonia Medel, Yunah Park, Zainab Sa’id Sa’ad, Bonnie Slade, Gameli Kodzo Tordzro, Agnieszka Uflewska and Aisara Yessenova.
Volume Editors: and
Queering the Vampire Narrative offers classroom-ready original essays that continue our explorations of vampires as representations of the cultural Other, which builds on the work of our previous texts. The editors argue, ultimately, the vampire is a queer icon, infinitely blurring the boundaries of identity and cultural norms and queering even the most seemingly stable notions, such as life, death, humanity, and monstrosity. The Vampire is the undead monarch of subtextual articulations of Otherness, especially queer behaviors and desires, offering explorations of the AIDS epidemic, the destabilization of ideas of fixed and stable sexuality, the search for community and chosen family, and the issues of individual and generational trauma. In current fictions, vampires are coming out of the coffin and the closet, identifying as openly queer and often created by queer writers, artists, and directors and bringing the subtext to the surface of the narrative. This volume seeks to create a dialogue about the impact and importance of the vampire on queer identity and queer theory and to answer the questions of why the vampire is such a compelling queer icon and what visions of vampires articulate about our ideas surrounding issues of sexuality, sexual orientation, sexual behaviors, and desires.
Fabulating Futures for Higher Education
Inspired by those who mothered before and through the COVID-19 pandemic, this is a book about, for, and with those who live different embodiments of academic mothering—mothers, othermothers, academic mothers, and mothering academics. In this book, mothering is defined broadly, encompassing those who are biologically or legally mothers with children; those who are “not-mother” but who nonetheless understand and practice mothering; those who do identify as mothers but not as women; and all those who take on mothering roles in academia and beyond.

Through poetry and prose, fiction and nonfiction, image and text, the authors in this edited book creatively explore academic mothering through their unique lived experiences, illuminating three ideas that comprise the three sections of this book: mothering as practice, mothering in precarity, and mothering as relational. Through considering—and in many cases, writing about and through—their own mothering practices, this diverse collection of authors critique the systemic failures of academia in the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond, fabulating new possibilities that envision a future in which mothering is valued and supported in (and by) higher education.
International Comparative Perspectives in the History of Education
Volume Editor:
Understanding the processes related to gender construction requires a multi and interdisciplinary approach. Complexity emerges as a category of investigation and an end to be pursued, giving space to a plurality of voices, interpretations, and points of view. With such intellectual curiosity, the volume's authors questioned the inclusion and exclusion of these multiple voices in education. How has teaching on gender made room for this complexity? What views were included? Which ones were overlooked? What have educational models for children been privileged in the imagination? Which histories and stories have accompanied them in acquiring an awareness linked to gender? Through such important questions and many more, the volume highlights the gender changes that took place from mid-eighteen century to today in various contexts relating to formal and informal education through an international comparative perspective. The multiplicity of approaches, methodologies, and perspectives allows us to read and analyze these changes in a composite way, underlining little-known aspects of gender studies in the historical-educational field.
Possibilities and Tensions in Queer and Trans Studies in Education
Volume Editors: , , and
Growing out of a series of discussions and gatherings over the course of more than two years, Bridging the Rainbow Gap is a collection of chapters and response essays that take up key tensions, gaps, and possibilities in queer and trans scholarship in education. Working across K-12, higher education, and other education disciplines, the authors in the volume take up themes of identity development, ethnography, young adult literature, queer joy, queer potentiality, ideology, emerging issues in trans studies, whiteness in queer studies, and futures in queer and trans studies. Collectively, the book serves as an invitation into generative conversations about what queer and trans studies are, what they can be, and what they might do in education.
The book charts the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the impact that it has had on the lives of young people and their communities, education systems, the teaching profession, and the responses by governments, NGOs, and donor organisations in Pakistan. Drawing on theories of postcolonialism, feminism, and neoliberal globalisation, the authors explore the development of Pakistan as a postcolonial nation-state, and examine the legacies of colonialism in education systems and policies, teacher education and development. The Pakistani authors bring extensive knowledge and experience to this case study of the ‘broken promise’ of education for sustainable development. This mix of theoretical insight and practical experience promises to produce significant policy and development impact in post-COVID-19 Pakistan, South Asia more broadly, and in other postcolonial development contexts around the world as it develops a critique of the UN SDGs as a global and more local framework for development.

UPCOMING: Webinar / Launch 10th of May:COVID-19 and the (broken) promise of education for sustainable development: A case study from postcolonial Pakistan.