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Volume Editors: Radhika Iyengar and Christina T. Kwauk
The global education community, guided for decades by the concept of Education for Sustainable Development, has done little to support the radical transformation of education systems needed to respond to climate change. Part of this inertia rests in five roadblocks to quality education identified in a Brookings report, and about which stakeholders from the fields of ESD, GCED, GE, and HR education came together in April 2020 to begin discussing ways of addressing.

This edited volume picks up that conversation by laying out elements of a shared vision, or roadmap, for the global education sector in climate action. The volume includes perspectives that span multiple continents, disciplines, and positionalities within the education system – from policymakers to teachers to youth. It curates exiting literature, surfaces in-depth case studies, and presents overviews of conceptual frameworks on a diverse range of topics relating to systems transformation, monitoring and accountability mechanisms, lessons from the field, teacher support, as well as activism and advocacy by students.

Curriculum and Learning for Climate Action: Toward an SDG 4.7 Roadmap for Systems Change offers researchers, practitioners, donors, and decisionmakers insights into entry points for education systems change needed to reorient our relationship with our planetary systems.
Selected Papers of Mark Olssen
Author: Mark Olssen
Inspired by the writings of Michel Foucault, Olssen’s writings traverse philosophy, politics, education, and epistemology. This book comprises a selection of his papers published in academic journals and books over twenty-five years. Taken as a whole, the papers represent a redirection of the core axioms and directions of western ontology and philosophy in relation to how history, the subject, and education are theorised within the western philosophical tradition. Olssen’s writings not only contain a powerful critique and revision of western liberalism from a poststructuralist perspective, they both explicate and extend Michel Foucault’s challenge to the core axioms and assumptions underpinning western thought. As Stephen Ball suggests in his Foreword to this volume, “Olssen uses Foucault to explore issues… Olssen’s Foucault is not a lonely nihilist but a troubled provocateur who encourages in us toward the political project of self-formation – our relation to ourselves and always, to others."
Author: Patricia Leavy
Tess Lee is a world-famous novelist. Her inspirational books explore people’s innermost struggles and the human need to believe that there is light at the end of the tunnel. Jack Miller is a former federal agent. After spending decades immersed in a violent world, a residue remains. The night Tess and Jack met, their connection was palpable. She examined the scars on his body and said, “I’ve never seen anyone whose outsides match my insides.” The two embarked on an epic love story. Now in their fourth, blissful year of marriage, one catastrophic event will change everything and push their relationship to the brink. Can Tess move through this new trauma? Will Jack’s need for vengeance destroy their relationship? When trust is violated, can there be forgiveness? In order to find their way through to the end, Tess and Jack will need to go back to the beginning.

Supernova is a novel about walking through our past traumas, moving from darkness to light, and the ways in which love—from lovers, friends, or the art we experience—heals us and helps us learn to forgive ourselves and others. Written as unfolding action, Supernova is a poignant novel that moves fluidly between melancholy, humor, and joy. It can be read entirely for pleasure, selected for book clubs, or used as supplemental reading in a variety of courses in communication, psychology, social work, sociology, or women’s studies/gender studies.
The COVID-19 pandemic interrupted a chaotic political and social landscape within the United States. Its arrival revealed cracks in longstanding neoliberal narratives. In this book, the authors utilize critical theory to analyze the collapse of these hyper-individualistic narratives within the media, in the broad areas of economics, the nuclear family, and authoritarian populism and through the topics of scapegoating China, capitalist class economic messaging, the essential worker, the family under shutdown, the spread of conspiracy theories, and the ideologies of the COVID-19 protests. The book conclude with commentary on the significance of the George Floyd protests and their connection to the pandemic.
Volume Editors: Linda Ware and Janet Story Sauer
Volume Editor: JuliAnna Ávila
How would you implement Critical Digital Literacies in your own classrooms and educational programs?

You will find a valuable resource to answer that question in this volume, with a pronounced focus on social justice. Seventeen contributors advance the theories and praxis of Critical Digital Literacies. Aimed at literacy, teacher education, and English Education practitioners, this volume explores critical practices with digital tools. The chapters highlight activities and approaches which cross the boundaries of: genre; critical data literacy; materiality; critical self-reflection; preservice teacher education; gender; young adult literature; multimodal composition; assessment; gaming; podcasting; and second-language teacher education. Authors also explore the challenges of carrying out both the critical and the digital within the context and confines of traditional schooling.

Contributors are: Claire Ahn, JuliAnna Ávila, Alexander Bacalja, Lourdes Cardozo-Gaibisso, Edison Castrillón Angel, Elena Galdeano, Matthew Hall, Amber Jensen, Elisabeth Johnson, Raúl Alberto Mora, Luci Pangrazio, Ernesto Peña, Amy Piotrowski, Amanda Miller Plaizier, Holger Pötzsch, Mary Rice and Anna Smith.
Author: J.E. Sumerau
Who am I? Where did I come from? What is a family? How do families of choice develop?

These questions permeate the pages of Scarecrow wherein a bisexual, nonbinary trans feminine person named Erin seeks to make sense of her life in relation to the places, people, and events she has seen and left behind over time. As the novel begins, Erin tells us that “39 funerals, 35 years, and too many lovers to bother remembering brought me to this point.” From this opening statement, Erin reflects on three-and-a-half decades of experiences growing up working class, white, and queer in the southeastern U.S.; navigating sexual, gender, classed, racial, and religious meanings and relationships; surviving varied types of love, trauma, kindness, and violence; and joining the upper-middle class world of the professoriate. As the novel progresses, she shows us how these experiences intertwine, create opportunities, and leave scars that together fashion who she has become over time and in relation to others.

Scarecrow could be utilized in the teaching of sociology, social psychology, Symbolic Interactionism, narrative, families, gender, sexualities, race, class, geography, biography, Southern Studies, LGBTQIA studies, trauma recovery, courses about aging and the life course, or of course, it could be read entirely for pleasure.
A Story of Quarantine and a Question of Conscience
Author: R. P. Clair
Buried Together: A Story of Quarantine and a Question of Conscience is a work of historical fiction based on the true story of Silas Mercer Beasley Jr., a Civil War conscientious objector. Silas Jr.’s brothers fought for both sides (Union and Confederacy) and a few questioned Silas’ courage. Following the war, he and his Union veteran brothers faced threats of death from local Southerners. Silas gathered his family and left Georgia in pursuit of his missing brothers and safety. All but Silas fell ill during this exodus due to the pandemic (i.e., smallpox, typhoid fever, measles). They sought refuge in a cabin in Tennessee where they quarantined through these troubling times. During their quarantine, Silas’ mother told the story of the Cherokee Removal and the infamous Kilakeena Elias Boudinot to help her son keep vigil so that he might protect the family from marauders. Surrounded by danger, Silas Jr. was faced with more than one life and death decision and more than one heart-breaking loss.

This historical novel speaks to contemporary issues. Based on archival documents and Silas Jr.’s published diary accounts of the Civil War times and beyond, readers learn of conscription, bi-racial families, and voter suppression. With respect to the Cherokee Removal, readers learn about the culture as depicted through the ethnographic work of James Mooney. They further learn of various Generals’ opposition to the Cherokee Removal and political strategies of Jackson and Van Buren. But more than this, readers learn of the life experiences of one family, and of one man; the heartbreak they endured and the resilience they displayed.
A Critical Review for Educators, Librarians, Families, Researchers & Writers
This enriched reference guide offers a unique overview of more than 200 picture books published by Canadian publishing houses between 2017–2019. The authors cover key themes in contemporary Canadian titles that match broad curriculum trends in education. Response activities are included in the text, for example frameworks for critical literacy discussions, along with annotated bibliographies that specifically recognize titles by Indigenous authors and illustrators. The book also contains original interviews with a dozen rising stars in Canadian writing and book illustration. While the book is specifically geared for educators, it also supports public libraries, Education researchers, and future picture book creators, as well as families who are interested in learning more about reading development and related literacy activities for the home setting.
This book explores how narratives are deeply embodied, engaging heart, soul, as well as mind, through varying adult learner perspectives. Biographical research is not an isolated, individual, solipsistic endeavor but shaped by larger ecological interactions – in families, schools, universities, communities, societies, and networks – that can create or destroy hope.

Telling or listening to life stories celebrates complexity, messiness, and the rich potential of learning lives. The narratives in this book highlight the rapid disruption of sustainable ecologies, not only ‘natural’, physical, and biological, but also psychological, economic, relational, political, educational, cultural, and ethical. Yet, despite living in a precarious, and often frightening, liquid world, biographical research can both chronicle and illuminate how resources of hope are created in deeper, aesthetically satisfying ways. Biographical research offers insights, and even signposts, to understand and transcend the darker side of the human condition, alongside its inspirations.

Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research aims to generate insight into people’s fears and anxieties but also their capacity to 'keep on keeping on' and to challenge forces that would diminish their and all our humanity. It provides a sustainable approach to creating sufficient hope in individuals and communities by showing how building meaningful dialogue, grounded in social justice, can create good enough experiences of togetherness across difference. The book illuminates what amounts to an ecology of life, learning and human flourishing in a sometimes tortured, fractious, fragmented, and fragile world, yet one still offering rich resources of hope.