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To solve the global challenges of the present society, contemporary scholarship requires that all diverse social groups are included in knowledge production through education. Professionalisation is one way in which diverse social groups can engage in knowledge production in higher education. While all kinds of professionalisation produce citizens who can contribute to the social, political and economic development, the teaching profession is foundational as most people have come through the hands of teachers from basic to higher education.

Teaching has been referred to as the noblest of professions because it does not only require acquisition of knowledge and skills, but high levels of professionalism, dignity, honour and the ability to lead by example. While inclusion of all diverse social groups is topical after attainment of independence in African countries largely and in South Africa particularly, professionalisation of students with disabilities into the teaching profession and in settings for integrated learning, has received little attention from scholars in the disability field.

Professionalisation of Students with Disabilities into the Teaching Profession in South African Higher Education critically reflects on what affordances and challenges face students with disabilities in professionalisation into the teaching professions and on how students are socialised to identify with the profession. It does so from the lived experiences of students with disabilities, the academics who teach them, the support staff and the author’s nuanced understanding of the professionalisation, the teaching profession, and transformation to include all in the South African context of higher education.
Issues Vital to Address
This book unpicks how the growing role of technology, particularly tools designed to solve real-world problems, impacts thinking and expression. Mind-bending AI-generated fact, fiction, art and music challenge the boundaries of machine capability and human consciousness. Quantum physics views consciousness as self-observation reliant on language and thinking. Now machines implement life routines, there is a need for better human thinkers and communicators for tackling issues, like climate change and overpopulation. World Thinking Studies show decline in language and thinking, with one-third of adults lacking them for life needs. Technology reduces direct talk – essential for thought. A 2024 Mental State of the Year study finds Britain the world’s second most miserable place, only slightly more cheerful than Uzbekistan, showing inability to think through and solve problems. The subjects discussed in this book are processes, for applying technology successfully; practices, to determine how to implement technology support for thinking, communication, and collaboration; performance, in terms of student technology experiences; and predictions, to outline and analyse current technology trends.
Series Editors: and
Bold Visions in Educational Research is international in scope and includes books from two areas: teaching and learning to teach and research methods in education. Each area contains multi-authored handbooks of approximately 200,000 words and monographs (authored and edited collections) of approximately 130,000 words. All books are scholarly, written to engage specified readers and catalyze changes in policies and practices. Defining characteristics of books in the series are their explicit uses of theory and associated methodologies to address important problems. We invite books from across a theoretical and methodological spectrum from scholars employing quantitative, statistical, experimental, ethnographic, semiotic, hermeneutic, historical, ethnomethodological, phenomenological, case studies, action, cultural studies, content analysis, rhetorical, deconstructive, critical, literary, aesthetic and other research methods.
Books on teaching and learning to teach focus on any of the curriculum areas (e.g., literacy, science, mathematics, social science), in and out of school settings, and points along the age continuum (pre K to adult). The purpose of books on research methods in education is not to present generalized and abstract procedures but to show how research is undertaken, highlighting the particulars that pertain to a study. Each book brings to the foreground those details that must be considered at every step on the way to doing a good study. The goal is not to show how generalizable methods are but to present rich descriptions to show how research is enacted. The books focus on methodology, within a context of substantive results so that methods, theory, and the processes leading to empirical analyses and outcomes are juxtaposed. In this way method is not reified, but is explored within well-described contexts and the emergent research outcomes. Three illustrative examples of books are those that allow proponents of particular perspectives to interact and debate, comprehensive handbooks where leading scholars explore particular genres of inquiry in detail, and introductory texts to particular educational research methods/issues of interest. to novice researchers.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to the Aquisitions Editor, John Bennett.
The authors in this volume offer a new set of lenses that brings into focus the possibilities offered by different pedagogical approaches. With these lenses, this volume recognizes and answers the growing call from learners, parents, educators, communities, and national leaders for a re-imagined way to educate. This volume creates a vision of the future of education that calls for engagement in such pedagogies as blended learning, disruptive technology, connected and personalized.

Contributors are: Vinita Abichandani, Fatma Nur Aktaş, Anastasios Athanasiadis, Anastasios (Tasos) Barkatsas, Seth Brown, Athina Chalkiadaki, Grant Cooper, Carlos García Cuadrado, Kimberley Daly, Yüksel Dede, Zara Ersozlu, Andrew Gilbert, James Goring, Anne K. Horak, Kathy Jordan, Katerina Kasimatis, Gillian Kidman, Peter Kelly, Manolis Koutouzis, Alex Koutsouris, Huk-Yuen Law, Susan Ledger, Kathy Littlewood, Simone Macdonald, Elisa Arranz Martín, Tricia McLaughlin, Juanjo Mena, Claudia Orellana, Anastasia Papadopoulou, Vassiliki Papadopoulou, Kate Park, Scott K. Phillips, Ioanna Skaltsa, Micah Swartz, Hazel Tan, and Lisa Williams.
Volume Editor:
Arts Education: A Global Affair highlights the adaptations that arts educators and researchers have undertaken to successfully adjust to the changes in arts education practices as a consequence of the global pandemic and its ongoing variants. Moreover, teaching and research in arts education have changed significantly as a consequence of the world-wide pandemic, COVID-19. Emerging variants have exacerbated the situation and show no signs of subsiding. In response to these challenges, arts educators and researchers have developed new modes of instructional delivery and data collection. These include asynchronous, synchronous, hybrid and bi-modal online learning, and online questionnaires, surveys, focus groups, and video interviews. This volume highlights the adaptations that arts educators and researchers have undertaken to successfully adjust to this new reality in education.
Course Design for University Teachers
Author:
Universities and their teachers are more than ever required to (re)design their courses considering online environments. Although face-to-face teaching remains fundamental, exploring online alternatives is becoming increasingly necessary. Still, how can university teacher designers proceed with such a change in their courses? What is the most effective way to design an online course? How can university teacher designers attract the attention of students and make teaching interesting and compelling? Evidence-Based Blended and Online Learning: Course Design for University Teachers answers these questions. It provides a thorough evidence-based overview of each step required to make an effective course redesign.

The book is aimed at teachers and, more significantly, teacher designers committed to redesigning their courses based on solid principles. The book’s design approach makes it much easier to translate the results of educational research on applying blended learning in educational practice.

Jan Nedermeijer has worked as an educational expert for several universities and as a senior expert for PUM Netherlands in several countries. The book synthesises the results of the numerous course- and curriculum-development projects he has conducted over many years. His approach can help university teachers implement IT in feasible, practical and interesting ways.

Evidence-Based Blended and Online Learning gives lecturers tailor-made pedagogical suggestions for designing modern higher education. Course design tasks are re-described, using features from technical design, problem solving, and design thinking, where creative design has a unique and essential role.
The events of the last years have shaken the world of higher education. The post-COVID-19 period has raised multiple questions in key areas, from digitalisation over quality assurance to internationalisation. This book brings together scholars, practitioners and policymakers in higher education, and discusses in a variety of topics the future of the higher education sector in a rapidly changing context: the complexities of digital education, the need or necessity for innovation or the impact of globalisation are some of the topics addressed in this book. Those topics are brought together around one central theme: how can the future of higher education be accelerated to address in a sustainable way the needs of a changing global context?

Contributors are: Mario Alarcón, Bruno Broucker, James Calleja, Ida Iselin Eriksson, Magdalena Fellner, Hugo A. García, Corinna Geppert, Carmen Heidenwolf, Andrew S. Herridge, Torstein Nielsen Hole, Pablo Hormazábal Saavedra, Lisa J. James, Kerstin Janson, Cindy Konen, Gergely Kováts, René Krempkow, Alice Laufer, Clare Milsom, Darlington Mutakwa, Mark O'Hara, Attila Pausits, Pascale Stephanie Petri, Julia Rathke, Florian Reisky, Katharina Riesinger, Christian Schemer, Marit Ubbe and Denyse Webbstock.
Radical Collegiality and Relational Pedagogies of Care in Education
Author:
How can we manifest more relational care in education by harnessing joy in the school setting? Finding Joy suggests it is found in care-based pedagogies, radical collegiality and relational reading practices. Guided by philosophical conversations with educational thinkers whose works have informed the author’s own praxis over a twenty-year career in public education, at the end of each chapter the reader is given provocations for reflection through a series of questions.

Finding Joy offers readers the opportunity to spend time with educational philosophers like Gert Biesta, Nel Noddings, Michael Fielding and Maxine Greene. A relational reading of education-adjacent thinkers like D.W. Winnicott and Martha Nussbaum also point to the work that must be done to sustain and grow a thriving collegium in a changing world. Using narrative interviews and a/r/tographical research to help unpack what care looks like in education across various sectors, this book suggests that collegiality and care are required for the support of both teachers and students.

Illuminating Diversity in Rural Communities in the United States
Illuminating issues of diversity at the intersection of rural education and multilingual learners (ML) in the United States, this edited volume brings forth new research that captures the importance of place and rurality in the work of educators who serve multilingual learners and their families. The six chapters in this book demonstrate that education for teachers, leaders and staff, professional development programs, and government-funded projects aimed to improve rural education need to begin with three interrelated, multifaceted principles. The first principle is the need to center place and rurality as essential factors that affect education for all educators, students, and families who live, work, and attend schools in rural communities. Second, educators must humanize multilingual students, their families, and their cultures in ways that go beyond merely acknowledging their presence – they must deeply see and understand the lives and (hi)stories of the multilingual students and families that they serve in their rural schools. Finally, the third principle involves identifying multilingual resources for ML students and their families. Given the persistent inequities in access to resources and opportunities that rural ML students and families face, this last principle requires careful planning, networking, and advocating in ways that can truly effectuate change.

Contributors are: Jioanna Carjuzaa, Maria R. Coady, Paula Golombek, Shuzhan Li, Kristin Kline Liu, Nidza V. Marichal, Charity Funfe Tatah Mentan, Kym O’Donnell, Stephanie Oudghiri, Darrell Peterson, Sonja Phillips, Jenelle Reeves and Yi-Chen Wu.