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Author: Bryan D. Palmer
Bryan D. Palmer reinterprets the history of labour and the left in the United States during the 1930s through a discussion of the emergence of Trotskyism in the most advanced capitalist country in the world. Focussing on James P. Cannon, the founder of American Trotskyism, Palmer builds on his previously published and award-winning book, James P. Cannon and the Origins of the American Revolutionary Left, 1890-1928 (2007), with a deeply-researched and elegantly-written study of Cannon and the Trotskyist movement in the United States from 1928-38.

Situating this dissident communist movement within the history of class struggle, both national and international, Palmer examines how Cannon and others fought to revive a combative trade unionism, thwart fascism and the drift to war, refuse Stalinism’s many degenerations, and build a new Party and a new International, both of which would be dedicating to reviving and realizing the possibilities of revolutionary socialism. The result is a study that provides a definitive account of the largest and most influential Trotskyist movement in the world in the 1930s, a mobilization whose history recasts understandings of the more extensively-studied experience of United States working-class militancy and the place of the Comintern-affiliated Communist Party within it.
Volume Editor: John F. Lopez
This book presents a historical overview of colonial Mexico City and the important role it played in the creation of the early modern Hispanic world. Organized into five sections, an interdisciplinary and international team of twenty scholars scrutinize the nature and character of Mexico City through the study of its history and society, religious practices, institutions, arts, and scientific, cartographic, and environmental endeavors. The Companion ultimately shows how viceregal Mexico City had a deep sense of history, drawing from all that the ancient Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa offered but where history, culture, and identity twisted and turned in extraordinary fashion to forge a new society.

Contributors are: Matthew Restall, Luis Fernando Granados, Joan C. Bristol, Sonya Lipsett-Rivera, Frances L. Ramos, Antonio Rubial García, Alejandro Cañeque, Cristina Cruz González, Iván Escamilla González, María del Pilar Martínez López-Cano, Enrique González González, Paula S. De Vos, Barbara E. Mundy, John F. López, Miruna Achim, Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Martha Lilia Tenorio, Jesús A. Ramos-Kitrell, Amy C. Hamman, and Stacie G. Widdifield.
Volume Editors: Terressa A. Benz and Graham Cassano
This volume places the Flint, Michigan, water contamination disaster in the context of a broader crisis of neoliberal governance in the United States. Authors from a range of disciplines (including sociology, criminal justice, anthropology, history, communications, and jurisprudence) examine the failures in Flint, but with an emphasis upon comparison, calling attention to similar trajectories for cities like Detroit and Pontiac, in Michigan, and Stockton, in California. While the studies collected here emphasize policy failures, class conflict, and racial oppression, they also attend to the resistance undertaken by Flint residents, Michiganders, and U.S. activists, as they fought for environmental and social justice.

Contributors include: Terressa A. Benz, Jon Carroll, Graham Cassano, Daniel J. Clark, Katrinell M. Davis, Michael Doan, David Fasenfest, A.E. Garrison, Peter J. Hammer, Ami Harbin, Shea Howell, Jacob Lederman, Raoul S. Lievanos, Benjamin J. Pauli, and Julie Sze.
Fragments of the Sixteenth-Century Nahuatl Census from the Jagiellonian Library: A Lost Manuscript provides a missing chunk of the sixteenth century Marquesado census—one of the earliest known texts in Nahuatl. In the critical edition of this manuscript, Julia Madajczak, Katarzyna Granicka, Szymon Gruda, Monika Jaglarz, and José Luis de Rojas reveal how it traveled across the Atlantic only to be lost during World War II and then rediscovered at the Jagiellonian Library, Poland. When connected to other surviving fragments of the Marquesado census, now held in Mexico and France, the Jagiellonian Library manuscript sheds new light on pre-contact and early colonial Nahua society. The authors use it to discuss the concept of calpolli, family life, and the production of administrative documentation in the early colonial Tepoztlan of today’s Morelos.
The American Colonies, 1500-1830
The early modern colonization of the Americas ranks among the most influential developments that shaped the modern world. Between the initial exploratory European contacts with the Americas in the late fifteenth century and the eventual independence of American states from Europe lies the multifaceted development of small communities into large colonies, which drew upon their European inheritance and their New World experience and interaction with non-European cultures and societies to form distinctive cultures and identities. The peer-reviewed book series Early American History Series is dedicated to the advancement of scholarly understanding of the history of the colonization of the Americas. It offers explorations on any aspect of early American history to a broad audience of historians. These investigations may be conceived in the broadest way chronologically, geographically, and thematically, whether in explicitly comparative studies, or by the grouping of studies. The book series is housed at the State University of New York—New Paltz (U.S.A.).
Issues and Methods
Editor: Raanan Rein
Jewish Latin America: Issues and Methods aims at expanding the boundaries of this field of inquiry devoted to Jewish experiences in Latin America and the Caribbean. Open to original studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences, it hopes to transcend disciplinary borders. This new series welcomes research on a variety of issues and groups that have not received sufficient attention in the historiography. Thus, for example, both affiliated and non-affiliated Jews will be considered, as well as Zionists and non-Zionists, and Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jews. Gender and social issues and popular culture will also figure prominently.

A comparative approach, challenging particularistic emphases, is encouraged, as well as studies of national vs. trans-national ties, and new approaches to the study of ethnicity and Diaspora. Attention will be given not only to the bigger communities of Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico but also to smaller communities in Central America, the Caribbean and South America. Both monographic studies and edited volumes will be published. All manuscripts will be peer reviewed before publication.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
A Jewish weapons manufacturer during the American Civil War, a Jewish-Canadian chair of the Metropolitan Toronto Police Board, and Jewish-Argentine guerrilla fighters—these are some of the individuals discussed in this first-of-its-kind volume. It brings together some of the best new works on armed Jews in the Americas. Links between Jews and their ties to weapons are addressed through multiple cultural, political, social, and ideological contexts, thus breaking down longstanding, stilted myths in many societies about Jews and weaponry. Anti-Semitism and Jewish self-defense, Jewish volunteers in the Spanish Civil War and in the 1948 Arab-Israeli war, and Jewish-American gangsters as ethnic heroes form part of the little-researched topic of Jews and arms in the Americas.