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Volume 2: The Stratigraphy, Ceramics, and Other Finds
Horvat Omrit is a Roman period sanctuary complex in northern Israel with well-preserved temple architecture. This report presents artifacts recovered in the temenos excavations from 1999 to 2011. The volume begins with a discussion of the excavated stratigraphy, the major building phases, and the dates associated with them. Subsequent chapters examine Hellenistic and Roman ceramics, lamps, terracotta figurines, wall paintings and frescoes, coins from the Roman and medieval periods, a dedicatory pavement inscription, a 3rd-century BCE Aramaic inscription, faunal remains, jewellery, an 8th-century BCE cylinder seal, a marble sphinx, a stucco relief, and a small, inscribed altar. An appendix associates the catalogued artifacts with their stratigraphic locations. Altogether the artifacts contribute to the archaeology and history of a diverse Galilee.
This book concerns the ancient rock-cut monuments carved throughout the Near East, paying particular attention to the fate of these monuments in the centuries after their initial production. As parts of the landscapes in which they were carved, they acquired new meanings in the cultural memory of the people living around them. The volume joins numerous recent studies on the reception of historical texts and artefacts, exploring the peculiar affordances of these long-lasting and often salient monuments. The volume gathers articles by archeologists, art historians, and philologists, covering the entire Near East, from Iran to Lebanon and from Turkey to Egypt. It also analyzes long-lasting textual traditions that aim to explain the origins and meaning of rock-cut monuments and other related carvings.
Author: Bruce Lincoln
In Religion, Culture, and Politics in Pre-Islamic Iran, Bruce Lincoln offers a vast overview on different aspects of the Indo-Iranian, Zoroastrian and Pre-Islamic mythologies, religions and cultural issues. The book is organized in four sections according to the body of evidence they engage most directly: Avestan, Old Persian, Pahlavi, and Iranian materials in comparison with other data, including studies of myths, especially those with cosmogonic implications, ritual practices, cosmological constructions of space and time, points of intersection between religion, ethics, law, and politics, ideological aspects of scientific and medical theorizing, social organization and gender relations, and other diverse topics.
Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity E-Books Onlineis the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Biblical Studies, Ancient Near East and Early Christianity Studies.

Coverage:
Biblical Studies, Ancient Judaism, Ancient Near East, Egyptology, Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnosticism & Manichaeism, Early Church & Patristics

This e-book collection is part of Brill's Humanities and Social Sciences E-Book collection.

The list of titles per collection can be found here.
Author: Giorgia Cafici
In The Egyptian Elite as Roman Citizens Giorgia Cafici offers the analysis of private, male portrait sculptures as attested in Egypt between the end of the Ptolemaic and the beginning of the Roman Period.

Ptolemaic/Early Roman portraits are examined using a combination of detailed stylistic evaluation, philological analysis of the inscriptions and historical and prosopographical investigation of the individuals portrayed. The emergence of this type of sculpture has been contextualised, both geographically and chronologically, as it belongs to a wider Mediterranean horizon.

The analysis has revealed that eminent members of the Egyptian elite decided to be represented in an innovative way, echoing the portraits of eminent Romans of the Late Republic, whose identity was surely known in Egypt.
Editors: Weippert and Baruch Halpern
The Near East has witnessed several of the world's earliest major civilizations and is the cradle of its three monotheistic religions.
The Studies in the History and Culture of the Ancient Near East are concerned with political, social and economic history;religion; the state, kingship and administration; agriculture, husbandry, nutrition, crafts and education; science and technology; literature and performing arts; et cetera.
Geographically the series covers the fertile crescent, Anatolia, Cyprus , Iran and the Arabian peninsula, while chronologically the period from early historical times to about 600 A.D. is covered.
The series includes monographs on substantial subjects, thematic collections of articles, and handbooks The Volumes contribute to scholarly research. Their accesibility is enhanced by a proper organization of the contents and, wherever appropriate, by indexes. They include introductions placing the subjects of the context of pertinent developments of the time, and of current research.
The Volumes are in English, occasionally in German or French.
The Volumes are as a rule between 200 and 450 printed pages.
In his new monograph Early Arsakid Parthia (ca. 250-165 B.C.): At the Crossroads of Iranian, Hellenistic, and Central Asian History, Marek Jan Olbrycht explores the early history of the Arsakid Parthian state. Making use of literary and epigraphic evidence as well numismatic and archaeological sources, Olbrycht convincingly depicts how the Arsakid dynasty created a kingdom (248 B.C.-A.D. 226), small at first, which, within a century after its founding, came to dominate the Iranian Plateau and portions of Central Asia as well as Mesopotamia. The “Parthian genius” lay in the Arsakids’ ability to have blended their steppe legacy with that of sedentary Iranians, and to have absorbed post-Achaemenid Iranian and Seleukid socio-economic, political, and cultural traditions.
Proceedings of an Eighth Symposium on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ben Sira
Volume Editor: Steven Fassberg
The 21 essays in this volume deal with the language and text of Hebrew corpora from the Second Temple period. They were originally presented at the Eighth International Symposium on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ben Sira, held in January 2016 in Jerusalem.
Most of the papers focus on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the light of First and Second Temple Hebrew. A few of the contributions are devoted primarily to the language of Ben Sira, Samaritan Hebrew, and Mishnaic Hebrew. You will find discussions of orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, language contact, and sociolinguistics.